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The Role Of United States V. Cooley And Mcgirt V. Oklahoma In Determining Criminal Jurisdiction In Indian Country, Prof. Dustin Jansen Jun 2023

The Role Of United States V. Cooley And Mcgirt V. Oklahoma In Determining Criminal Jurisdiction In Indian Country, Prof. Dustin Jansen

Tribal Law Journal

Understanding jurisdiction is paramount to deciding whether federal, state, or tribal courts can exercise jurisdiction for crimes committed in Indian country. The evolution of federal Indian law has created a legal landscape that is far from consistent. For the Indian law practitioner, it is important to stay abreast of the latest case law available to understand where proper jurisdiction lies. The latest cases of McGirt v. Oklahoma and United States v. Cooley are the newest case law available that demonstrate the Supreme Court’s reasoning and analysis in determining proper jurisdiction.


A Proposal For A Model Indigenous Intellectual Property Protectiontribal Code (Miipptc), Prof. Tomasz G. Smolinski Jun 2023

A Proposal For A Model Indigenous Intellectual Property Protectiontribal Code (Miipptc), Prof. Tomasz G. Smolinski

Tribal Law Journal

The appropriation of Native American cultural and intellectual property has become commonplace in the United States. At the same time, mainstream, Western cultural/intellectual property laws are inadequate to properly protect traditional Indigenous knowledge. To address this problem, scholars have begun to advocate for a three-tiered system, in which, in addition to national and international legal protections, tribal laws would play a fundamental role in the fight against cultural appropriation. Alas, few Native American tribes explicitly address cultural and/or intellectual property rights in any of their legal instruments. This is especially true with respect to intangible intellectual property, such as traditional …


Front Matter, Tribal Law Journal Jun 2023

Front Matter, Tribal Law Journal

Tribal Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Tribes And H-1bs: Promoting Inclusion Of Tribal Interests In Immigration Policy Through Employment-Based Visas, Alejandro Alvarado Jun 2023

Tribes And H-1bs: Promoting Inclusion Of Tribal Interests In Immigration Policy Through Employment-Based Visas, Alejandro Alvarado

Tribal Law Journal

Tribal law and immigration law provide a comprehensive space, with plenty of crossover issues, for legal practitioners to explore how immigration law may benefit Tribes and Indigenous Peoples. These issues arise from the history of the United States undermining Tribal interests through immigration policy as it created international borders and established citizenship criteria. As a result, Indigenous Peoples have been impacted by U.S. immigration policy with regard to global mobility, family separation, issues related to border security, and economic prosperity. With the continued growth of Tribal economies, U.S. immigration policy risks limiting Tribal interests and welfare by not providing explicit …


Experiments In Legal Hybridity: From Indian Tort Law To Tribal Tort Law, Noah T. Allaire Jun 2023

Experiments In Legal Hybridity: From Indian Tort Law To Tribal Tort Law, Noah T. Allaire

Tribal Law Journal

Tort law is a broad set of rules designed to compensate people who have suffered injuries and harm by imposing penalties on those who caused the resulting injuries and harm. Indian tort law is the limited set of rules that the United States imposed upon tribal nations over a century ago. Today, tribal courts have the important opportunity and responsibility to articulate tribal tort law. Tribal legislatures, in turn, can codify tribal tort rules to guide future judicial decisionmaking. Through this process, tribal tort law will gradually supplant Indian tort law. Articulating tribal tort law necessarily involves conducting experiments in …


Traditional Tlingit Law & Governance And Contemporary Sealaska Corporate Governance: 4 Core Values And A Jurisprudence Of Transformation, Micah S. Mcneil , Esq. Jun 2023

Traditional Tlingit Law & Governance And Contemporary Sealaska Corporate Governance: 4 Core Values And A Jurisprudence Of Transformation, Micah S. Mcneil , Esq.

Tribal Law Journal

This paper will give historical insight into the Tlingit Nation’s governance and showcase how their government has changed over time. This paper will then talk about the unique form of governance adapted through the Sealaska Corporation and its various associate organizations. The Tlingit governmental structure was clan-based throughout its history but has evolved to a regional corporate and tribal government structure because of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA). Fundamental to Tlingit law and governance is holding to core values while embracing a jurisprudence of change and transformation. Though, I focus on the four core values of the Tlingit, …


“Subsistence Is Cultural Survival”: Examining The Legal Framework For The Recognition And Incorporation Of Traditional Cultural Landscapes Within The National Historic Preservation Act, Wesley James Furlong Jun 2023

“Subsistence Is Cultural Survival”: Examining The Legal Framework For The Recognition And Incorporation Of Traditional Cultural Landscapes Within The National Historic Preservation Act, Wesley James Furlong

Tribal Law Journal

Over the past thirty years, Tribes have exercised growing influence in federal land management and permitting decisions, precipitated, in part, by amendments to the National Historic Preservation Act (“NHPA”) and evolving perspectives in cultural resource management and historic preservation. Despite the increased influence Tribes have gained in federal decision-making processes with the NHPA, it is often an ineffective tool to protect tribal cultural resources. Indigenous cultural resources and perspectives on cultural resource stewardship often do not fit easily within the NHPA’s framework. Nevertheless, until federal law is changed to actually protect Indigenous cultural resources, Tribes must operate within this existing …


Surviving Castro-Huerta: The Historical Perseverance Of The Basic Policy Of Worcester V. Georgia Protecting Tribal Autonomy, Notwithstanding One Supreme Court Opinion's Errant Narrative To The Contrary, John P. Lavelle Apr 2023

Surviving Castro-Huerta: The Historical Perseverance Of The Basic Policy Of Worcester V. Georgia Protecting Tribal Autonomy, Notwithstanding One Supreme Court Opinion's Errant Narrative To The Contrary, John P. Lavelle

Faculty Scholarship

Oklahoma v. Castro‑Huerta is an unprecedented attack on the autonomy of Native American nations in the United States. The Supreme Court held that Oklahoma had jurisdiction over a crime committed by a non‑Indian perpetrator against an Indian victim within the Cherokee Reservation’s boundaries. The decision posits that states presumptively have jurisdiction, concurrent with the federal government, over crimes by non‑Indians against Indians in Indian country. But this proposition is at war with a bedrock principle of Indian law, namely, that reservations are essentially “free from state jurisdiction and control,” a policy that “is deeply rooted in the Nation’s history.” That …


Brief Of Amici Curiae Law Professors & Indian Law Experts In Support Of Petition For A Writ Of Certiorari, Smith V. United States, Barbara L. Creel, Verónica Gonzales-Zamora, Marc-Tizoc Gonzaléz Mar 2023

Brief Of Amici Curiae Law Professors & Indian Law Experts In Support Of Petition For A Writ Of Certiorari, Smith V. United States, Barbara L. Creel, Verónica Gonzales-Zamora, Marc-Tizoc Gonzaléz

Faculty Scholarship

The decision reached by the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, permitting the application of state criminal law to punish a tribal member whose alleged criminal conduct occurred on an Indian reservation and caused no harm to another person—solely based on the Assimilative Crimes Act (ACA), 18 U.S.C. § 13 is contrary to numerous treaties, acts of Congress, and foundational principles
of tribal sovereignty as construed and upheld by this Court’s federal Indian law jurisprudence. Allowing the Ninth Circuit decision to stand renders express
congressional authorizations and limitations on federal and state criminal jurisdiction over Indians in …


Colorado River Indian Tribes Water Resiliency Act Of 2022, United States 117th Congress Jan 2023

Colorado River Indian Tribes Water Resiliency Act Of 2022, United States 117th Congress

Native American Water Rights Settlement Project

This Act authorizes the Colorado River Indian Tribes to enter into lease or exchange agreements and storage agreements relating to water of the Colorado River allocated to the Colorado River Indian Tribes, and for other purposes.


White Mountain Apache Tribe Water Rights Quantification Act, United States 117th Congress Jan 2023

White Mountain Apache Tribe Water Rights Quantification Act, United States 117th Congress

Native American Water Rights Settlement Project

The purpose of this amendment to the White Mountain Apache Tribe Water Rights Quantification Act of 2010 is to extend the enforceability date for the deadline for publication of the statement of findings to December 30, 2027 with a repeal date of December 31, 2027 of Title III of the Act for failure to meet the revised deadline. Certain provisions include clarifying funding, cost indexing, cost overrun subaccount (increase in authorized appropriations and prohibition), use of funds (expenditures), oversight and accounting, and other purposes.


Hualapai Tribe Water Rights Settlement Act Of 2022, United States 117th Congress Jan 2023

Hualapai Tribe Water Rights Settlement Act Of 2022, United States 117th Congress

Native American Water Rights Settlement Project

The purposes of this Act are—(1) to resolve, fully and finally, all claims to rights to water in the State, including the Verde River, the Bill Williams River, and the Colorado River, of— (A) the Hualapai Tribe, on behalf of the Hualapai Tribe and the members of the Hualapai Tribe; and (B) the United States, acting as trustee for the Hualapai Tribe, the members of the Hualapai Tribe, and the allottees; (2) to authorize, ratify, and confirm the Hualapai Tribe water rights settlement agreement, to the extent that agreement is consistent with this Act; (3) to authorize and direct the …


Science, Technology, Engineering, And Mathematics (Stem) Project-Based Learning (Pbl) Education: A New Mexico Case Study For Equity And Inclusion, Kimberly A. Scheerer Nov 2022

Science, Technology, Engineering, And Mathematics (Stem) Project-Based Learning (Pbl) Education: A New Mexico Case Study For Equity And Inclusion, Kimberly A. Scheerer

Teacher Education, Educational Leadership & Policy ETDs

This research addresses how student participation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) project-based learning (PBL) education activities encourages underrepresented minority student achievement in STEM career field trajectories. Seven New Mexico high school counselors and 12 STEM organization personnel were interviewed during this study. Their responses represent the nuanced professional voices where New Mexico public education intersects with STEM student interest and cultural influence.

For students, STEM PBL can foster deep integration across educational disciplines and enhance STEM career trajectory interest and readiness. STEM education converged with PBL methodologies has the ability to leverage community support while broadening student networks. …


Jemez Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2022), Tribal Law Journal Staff Mar 2022

Jemez Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2022), Tribal Law Journal Staff

Tribal Law Journal

This handbook helps take some of the mystery out of practicing in tribal courts. Without the necessary information to learn new rules and protocols many attorneys are understandably reluctant to practice in a new jurisdiction. As a result, tribal courts are underused or misused. This handbook is intended to help attorneys and advocates become more aware of the various individual tribal court systems and to learn their rules and protocol.


Pueblo Of Pojoaque Tribal Court Handbook (2022), Tribal Law Journal Staff Mar 2022

Pueblo Of Pojoaque Tribal Court Handbook (2022), Tribal Law Journal Staff

Tribal Law Journal

This handbook helps take some of the mystery out of practicing in tribal courts. Without the necessary information to learn new rules and protocols many attorneys are understandably reluctant to practice in a new jurisdiction. As a result, tribal courts are underused or misused. This handbook is intended to help attorneys and advocates become more aware of the various individual tribal court systems and to learn their rules and protocol.


Case Note: Federal Indian Law – Tribal Criminal Jurisdiction – Indian Civil Rights Act – Tribal Sovereignty – United States V. Cooley, Sarah A. Sadlier, Mnikȟówožu Lakȟóta Jan 2022

Case Note: Federal Indian Law – Tribal Criminal Jurisdiction – Indian Civil Rights Act – Tribal Sovereignty – United States V. Cooley, Sarah A. Sadlier, Mnikȟówožu Lakȟóta

Tribal Law Journal

In United States v. Cooley, a Ninth Circuit panel denied a petition for rehearing en banc, holding that a tribal officer, who was not cross-deputized, could neither search nor detain a non-Indian on a federal or state highway right-of-way through the reservation unless that individual had committed an “apparent” crime in the officer’s presence. Narrowly defining tribal police authority, the panel ruled that the officer conducted an extra-jurisdictional search and seizure. In arriving at this conclusion, the panel refused to recognize that the Tribe’s sovereignty affords its law enforcement agencies the authority to investigate those who imperil public order on …


A 385-Year Experiment To Erase A People: Intergenerational Acts Of Genocide Against The Narragansett Indian Tribe By The United States Of America And The State Of Rhode Island, Taylor A. Dumpson, Afro-Indigenous; Black, Narragansett, Nanticoke, And Mohawk Ancestry Jan 2022

A 385-Year Experiment To Erase A People: Intergenerational Acts Of Genocide Against The Narragansett Indian Tribe By The United States Of America And The State Of Rhode Island, Taylor A. Dumpson, Afro-Indigenous; Black, Narragansett, Nanticoke, And Mohawk Ancestry

Tribal Law Journal

Since Roger Williams’ arrival in Narragansett Territory in 1636, and his subsequent settlement of the Providence Plantations, the Narragansett Indian Tribe--the Indigenous people to this land--have faced a series of intergenerational atrocities, including attempted genocides. For generations, these heinous wrongs have not been corrected by state or federal courts, which have often compounded the harms against the Narragansett people. Although the American legal system has played a role in perpetuating the intergenerational harms experienced by the Narragansett people, these institutions also have the opportunity to be a part of the solution. The Article examines the existing domestic legal framework for …


Affirmed Or Delegated? Finding Inherent Tribal Civil Power To Issue Protection Orders Against All Persons In Light Of Spurr V. Pope, Kelly Gaines Stoner, Cherokee Ancestry, Lauren Van Schilfgaarde, Cochiti Pueblo Jan 2022

Affirmed Or Delegated? Finding Inherent Tribal Civil Power To Issue Protection Orders Against All Persons In Light Of Spurr V. Pope, Kelly Gaines Stoner, Cherokee Ancestry, Lauren Van Schilfgaarde, Cochiti Pueblo

Tribal Law Journal

Federal courts have wreaked havoc on tribal jurisdiction by injecting incertitude over their most basic authority, including the authority to issue and enforce civil protection orders. This jurisdictional incertitude causes not just legal disruption, but also further compromises the safety of Native people who are disproportionately victimized, especially by gender-based forms of violence. While Congress has been slow to remedy the onslaught of judicial limitations on tribal jurisdiction, Congress has at least remedied tribal authority to issue and enforce protection orders in 18 U.S.C. § 2265(e). However, even in this remedy, jurisdictional incertitude remains.


Bad Men Among The Whites Claims In The Mni Wiconi Age, Julie Combs, Cherokee Nation Jan 2022

Bad Men Among The Whites Claims In The Mni Wiconi Age, Julie Combs, Cherokee Nation

Tribal Law Journal

In a series of nine treaties with Native Nations in the late 1860s, the United States promised to reimburse Indigenous people for wrongs committed by “bad men among the whites, or among other people subject to the authority of the United States.” In the century and half that followed the signing of these nine treaties, “bad men among the whites” claims have been litigated in the Federal Circuit with some success by Indigenous plaintiffs, and courts have shaped the meaning of the clause and the remedies a successful plaintiff may receive. This comment explores the Bad Men clause in the …


Dedication To Professor Christine Zuni Cruz, Tribal Law Journal Jan 2022

Dedication To Professor Christine Zuni Cruz, Tribal Law Journal

Tribal Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Of Reservation Boundary Lines And Judicial Battle Lines, Part 1 - Reservation Diminishment/Disestablishment Cases From 1962 To 1975: The Indian Law Justice Files, Episode 1, John P. Lavelle Jan 2022

Of Reservation Boundary Lines And Judicial Battle Lines, Part 1 - Reservation Diminishment/Disestablishment Cases From 1962 To 1975: The Indian Law Justice Files, Episode 1, John P. Lavelle

Faculty Scholarship

This Article is the first of a two-part investigation into the Indian law doctrine of reservation diminishment/disestablishment, examining Supreme Court decisions in this area in light of insights gathered from the collected papers of individual Justices archived at the Library of Congress and various university libraries. The Article first addresses Seymour v. Superintendent (1962) and Mattz v. Arnett (1973), observing that these first two diminishment/disestablishment cases are modern applications of basic, longstanding principles of Indian law which are highly protective of Indigenous people’s rights and tribal sovereignty. The Article then examines in detail DeCoteau v. District County Court, the anomalous …


Brief For American Indian Law Scholars As Amicus Curiae, Stephen C., Et Al V. Bureau Of Indian Education, Et Al.,, Barbara L. Creel, Tierra N. Marks, Randolph H. Barnhouse Jul 2021

Brief For American Indian Law Scholars As Amicus Curiae, Stephen C., Et Al V. Bureau Of Indian Education, Et Al.,, Barbara L. Creel, Tierra N. Marks, Randolph H. Barnhouse

Faculty Scholarship

Indian Civil Rights/Education Lawsuit

View this and other court documents at Turtle Talk.

Congress’s declared federal policy is “to fulfill the Federal Government’s unique and continuing trust relationship with and responsibility to the Indian people for the education of Indian children.” 25 U.S.C. § 2000. This federal policy is the touchstone of the federal government’s trust obligation to Indian families and their children. When the BIA (through the BIE) fails to protect the rights of Indian children to “educational opportunities that equal or exceed those for all other students in the United States,” courts have a vital role to …


Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2021), Tribal Law Journal Staff Apr 2021

Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2021), Tribal Law Journal Staff

Tribal Law Journal

This handbook helps take some of the mystery out of practicing in tribal courts. Without the necessary information to learn new rules and protocols many attorneys are understandably reluctant to practice in a new jurisdiction. As a result, tribal courts are underused or misused. This handbook is intended to help attorneys and advocates become more aware of the various individual tribal court systems and to learn their rules and protocol.


Civil Procedure Update 2021 (Handout And Slide Deck), Verónica Gonzales-Zamora, Julio C. Romero Apr 2021

Civil Procedure Update 2021 (Handout And Slide Deck), Verónica Gonzales-Zamora, Julio C. Romero

Faculty Scholarship

This presentation aims to 1) review recent amendments to the state and federal rules of civil procedure; 2) help you understand the impact of recent federal and state published opinions interpreting and applying the rules of civil procedure; and 3) assess your understanding of the updates.


When Imitation Is Not Flattery: Addressing Cultural Exploitation In Guatemala Through A Sui Generis Model, Paul Figueroa Apr 2021

When Imitation Is Not Flattery: Addressing Cultural Exploitation In Guatemala Through A Sui Generis Model, Paul Figueroa

Faculty Scholarship

Indigenous Guatemalan weavers are fighting for intellectual property laws that better protect their designs and other cultural expressions. The exploitation and appropriation by local and international companies has negatively affected the weavers’ livelihoods and resulted in culturally inappropriate uses of spiritual and traditional symbols. Adhering to Western ideals of individual creativity and utility, intellectual property laws in most of the world (including Guatemala) are not suited to protect indigenous creations. To address this legal gap, some countries have adopted sui generis legal regimes that align with communal notions of creation, ownership and stewardship found in indigenous knowledge systems. Based on …


Acoma Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2021), Tribal Law Journal Staff Jan 2021

Acoma Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2021), Tribal Law Journal Staff

Tribal Law Journal

This handbook helps take some of the mystery out of practicing in tribal courts. Without the necessary information to learn new rules and protocols many attorneys are understandably reluctant to practice in a new jurisdiction. As a result, tribal courts are underused or misused. This handbook is intended to help attorneys and advocates become more aware of the various individual tribal court systems and to learn their rules and protocol.


Taos Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2021), Tribal Law Journal Staff Jan 2021

Taos Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2021), Tribal Law Journal Staff

Tribal Law Journal

This handbook helps take some of the mystery out of practicing in tribal courts. Without the necessary information to learn new rules and protocols many attorneys are understandably reluctant to practice in a new jurisdiction. As a result, tribal courts are underused or misused. This handbook is intended to help attorneys and advocates become more aware of the various individual tribal court systems and to learn their rules and protocol.


Santa Clara Pueblo V. Martinez In The Evolution Of Federal Law, Richard B. Collins Jan 2021

Santa Clara Pueblo V. Martinez In The Evolution Of Federal Law, Richard B. Collins

Tribal Law Journal

Few Indian law decisions have evoked as much scholarly attention as Santa Clara Pueblo.1 Shepard's pulls up over 1000 law review references, and Google reports almost 3,000,000 hits.2 It is a major case in all Indian law treatises and casebooks and is important in several other books.3 Most analyze the decision as an event and focus on its principal holding, denying a federal cause of action for civil enforcement of the Indian Civil Rights Act.4 Policy discussions parse tribal sovereignty and discrimination against women.


Tribal Justice: Honoring Indigenous Dispute Resolution (Symposium Keynote Address), Deb Haaland Jan 2021

Tribal Justice: Honoring Indigenous Dispute Resolution (Symposium Keynote Address), Deb Haaland

Tribal Law Journal

Tribal Law Journal 20th Anniversary Symposium Keynote Address. I am working to weave our Native voice into a system that is not traditionally our own to make sure these legal fictions do not persist into another detrimental federal policy era. This symposium is highly valuable because it shows our community how important it is to incorporate indigenous traditional values into our legal system—but this is also important to highlight in our political systems and my effort to encourage more Native Americans to run for office and will continue. Native American people need to redefine all aspects of our governance systems …


Native American Oral Evidence: Finding A New Hearsay Exception, Max Virupaksha Katner Jan 2021

Native American Oral Evidence: Finding A New Hearsay Exception, Max Virupaksha Katner

Tribal Law Journal

The Federal Rules of Evidence hearsay rules unjustifiably exclude legitimate and trustworthy evidence that support many Native American legal claims. Native American communities traditionally were not literate and rarely recorded the treaties, contracts, and other legal instruments they drew up or honored in any kind of written format, oftentimes recording their histories and diplomatic events in other ways; take for example wampum belts used by the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, among others. While the U.S. legal system presupposes that evidence in written statements provides a greater assurance of accuracy and truth than oral statements, this is not always the case. Writing is …