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Natural Law, Assumptions, And Humility, Ezra Rosser May 2023

Natural Law, Assumptions, And Humility, Ezra Rosser

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This review of Natural Property Rights celebrates Eric Claeys’s efforts to resuscitate natural law as a viable approach to property law. Although readers unlikely to be convinced that natural law is the way to best understand property rights, Claeys succeeds in breathing new life into natural law. Natural Property Rights’ emphasis on use as property law’s fundamental value creates space to reconceptualize the rights of property owners and the place of non-owners within a just theory of property rights. The main critiques of Natural Property Rights offered in this review center around the choice to prioritize rights over duties and …


Brief For Amici Curiae Prof. Daniel Mccool, Prof. Ezra Rosser And Prof. David E. Wilkins, In Support Of Respondents, Ezra Rosser, David E. Wilkins Feb 2023

Brief For Amici Curiae Prof. Daniel Mccool, Prof. Ezra Rosser And Prof. David E. Wilkins, In Support Of Respondents, Ezra Rosser, David E. Wilkins

Amicus Briefs

No abstract provided.


Navajo Statehood: From Domestic Dependent Nation To 51st State, Ezra Rosser Jan 2023

Navajo Statehood: From Domestic Dependent Nation To 51st State, Ezra Rosser

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

The Supreme Court’s recent holding in Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta that “Indian country is part of the State, not separate from the State” is a reminder of tribal sovereignty’s precarious foundation under U.S. law. The Court’s holding not only broke with longstanding precedent regarding the relationship between tribes and states, but it is also incompatible with the lived experience of those living in the Navajo Nation. The Navajo Nation, not the states and not the federal government, has primary responsibility for governing an area roughly the size of West Virginia. Yet most maps of the United States demarcate only state boundaries, …


Legal Issues In Tribal E-Commerce, Adam Crepelle Jan 2022

Legal Issues In Tribal E-Commerce, Adam Crepelle

American University Business Law Review

No abstract provided.


Brazil’S Violence Against Indigenous Peoples, Andre Taylor Jan 2022

Brazil’S Violence Against Indigenous Peoples, Andre Taylor

Human Rights Brief

Centuries of violence and displacement define the relationship between indigenous peoples and the successive governments of Brazil. As Brazil embarks on a massive expansion of its agribusiness and mining operations, the systemic denial of land rights and illegal economic activity on protected lands has threatened traditional ways of life practiced by indigenous peoples. The most aggressive policy taken by the Brazilian government has involved legitimizing land claims on unregistered ancestral indigenous lands for development, putting 37,800 square miles of territory at risk for exploitation by loggers, ranchers, and farmers.


When Your Colonizers Are Hypocrites: Federal Poverty "Solutions" And Indigenous Survival Of Sex Trafficking In Indian Country, Alix Bruce Jan 2020

When Your Colonizers Are Hypocrites: Federal Poverty "Solutions" And Indigenous Survival Of Sex Trafficking In Indian Country, Alix Bruce

Articles in Law Reviews & Journals

No abstract provided.


America's Quiet Legacy Of Native American Voter Disenfranchisement: Prospects For Change In North Dakota After Brakebill V. Jaeger, Hannah Stambaugh Jan 2019

America's Quiet Legacy Of Native American Voter Disenfranchisement: Prospects For Change In North Dakota After Brakebill V. Jaeger, Hannah Stambaugh

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Watershed Moment In The Education Of American Indians: A Judicial Strategy To Mandate The State Of New Mexico To Meet The Unique Cultural And Linguistic Needs Of American Indians In New Mexico Public Schools, Preston Sanchez, Rebecca Blum-Martinez Jan 2019

A Watershed Moment In The Education Of American Indians: A Judicial Strategy To Mandate The State Of New Mexico To Meet The Unique Cultural And Linguistic Needs Of American Indians In New Mexico Public Schools, Preston Sanchez, Rebecca Blum-Martinez

American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law

No abstract provided.


"Enough's Enough": Protest Law And The Tradition Of Chilling Indigenous Free Speech, Alix H. Bruce Jan 2019

"Enough's Enough": Protest Law And The Tradition Of Chilling Indigenous Free Speech, Alix H. Bruce

Articles in Law Reviews & Journals

Indigenous peoples in the United States were not granted the full scope of their rights as citizens under the Constitution until the enactment of the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924. Before that—and after—several state and federal campaigns worked to stifle the civil rights of Indigenous peoples. Many of those unjust and unconstitutional policies were upheld by the Supreme Court. In the current era, the anti-pipeline protests on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota sparked a new recognition of Indigenous resistance under the First Amendment—and vicious state and federal backlash against Indigenous free speech via the …


A Watershed Moment In The Education Of American Indians: A Judicial Strategy To Mandate The State Of New Mexico To Meet The Unique Cultural And Linguistic Needs Of American Indians In New Mexico Public Schools, Preston Sanchez, Rebecca Blum-Martinez Jan 2019

A Watershed Moment In The Education Of American Indians: A Judicial Strategy To Mandate The State Of New Mexico To Meet The Unique Cultural And Linguistic Needs Of American Indians In New Mexico Public Schools, Preston Sanchez, Rebecca Blum-Martinez

American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law

No abstract provided.


Reclaiming The Navajo Range: Resolving The Conflict Between Grazing Rights And Development, Ezra Rosser Jan 2019

Reclaiming The Navajo Range: Resolving The Conflict Between Grazing Rights And Development, Ezra Rosser

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Grazing is fundamental to Navajo identity, yet management of the Navajo range remains highly problematic. This Essay connects the federal government's devastating livestock reduction effort of the 1930s with the inability of the Navajo Nation to place meaningful limits on grazing and the power of grazing permittees. It argues that the Navajo Nation should consider reasserting the tribe's traditional understanding that property rights depend on use as a way to create space for reservation development.


Native American Voting Rights: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back, Patrick Roche Jan 2019

Native American Voting Rights: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back, Patrick Roche

American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law

No abstract provided.


Indian Country And The Territory Clause: Washington's Promise At The Framing, John Hayden Dossett Jan 2018

Indian Country And The Territory Clause: Washington's Promise At The Framing, John Hayden Dossett

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Washington Redskins Case And The Search For Dignity, Victoria Phillips Jan 2017

The Washington Redskins Case And The Search For Dignity, Victoria Phillips

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

INTRODUCTION: For more than sixty years, Native American activists have been involved in discussions and protests over the appropriation and use of tribal references in sports names, logos, and mascots. During this same period, many of these uses have since been changed, driven by civil rights struggles and a growing awareness of the proven social harms and racism inherent in these references. Despite a gradual movement towards abolition and evolving signs of cultural understanding, many mascots invoking Native names and imagery persist today across professional, collegiate, and local school district sports. These mascots and team names, and the trademarks associated …


Registering Offense: The Prohibition Of Slurs As Trademarks, Christine Haight Farley Jan 2015

Registering Offense: The Prohibition Of Slurs As Trademarks, Christine Haight Farley

Contributions to Books

Since 1967, Pro-Football has registered six marks that include the term “redskins,” a derogatory racial epithet that refers to Native Americans. The use of disparaging marks dates back to the 19th century when brands commercialized racial stereotypes, such as Aunt Jemima. Today, offensive marks, including those that ridicule race, ethnicity, gender and religion are proliferating prompting the question of what role trademark law plays in protecting the interests of diverse communities. Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act prohibits the registration of marks that consist of matter that may disparage or bring into contempt or disrepute any person, institution, or belief. …


Political Possibilities Of Reparations, Ezra Rosser Jan 2015

Political Possibilities Of Reparations, Ezra Rosser

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This essay is a brief response to Gregory Alexander's article, published by Law and Social Inquiry, that generally argues against land reparations for past wrongs. This response argues that there are political reasons to leave land reparations on the table, focusing on the claims of Native American tribes.


Registering Offense: The Prohibition Of Slurs As Trademarks, Christine Farley Jan 2015

Registering Offense: The Prohibition Of Slurs As Trademarks, Christine Farley

Contributions to Books

Since 1967, Pro-Football has registered six marks that include the term “redskins,” a derogatory racial epithet that refers to Native Americans. The use of disparaging marks dates back to the 19th century when brands commercialized racial stereotypes, such as Aunt Jemima. Today, offensive marks, including those that ridicule race, ethnicity, gender and religion are proliferating prompting the question of what role trademark law plays in protecting the interests of diverse communities. Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act prohibits the registration of marks that consist of matter that may disparage or bring into contempt or disrepute any person, institution, or belief. …


Stabilizing Morality In Trademark Law, Christine Haight Farley Jan 2014

Stabilizing Morality In Trademark Law, Christine Haight Farley

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Almost all of the commentary concerning the statutory prohibition on registering offensive trademarks lambasts it as a misguided attempt to enforce civility through trademark law. This Article carefully considers the challenges accompanying section 2(a) of the U.S. Trademark Act and defends it as good policy. There are, however, a few instances in which the jurisprudence under section 2(a) has created more problems than it has solved. To alleviate these problems, this Article proposes judging words per se and abandoning the traditional trademark notion of evaluating words in context. Judging words per se is warranted given the very different objectives underlying …


Creating Space For Reservation Growth, Ezra Rosser Jan 2014

Creating Space For Reservation Growth, Ezra Rosser

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This brief article is a review of Robert J. Miller, Reservation "Capitalism": Economic Development in Indian Country (2012). It highlights some of the significant points Miller makes in his book and concludes that the book is a "must read" for those interested in reservation economic development.


Creating Space For Reservation Growth, Ezra Rosser Jan 2014

Creating Space For Reservation Growth, Ezra Rosser

Ezra Rosser

This brief article is a review of Robert J. Miller, Reservation "Capitalism": Economic Development in Indian Country (2012). It highlights some of the significant points Miller makes in his book and concludes that the book is a "must read" for those interested in reservation economic development.


The Ambition And Transformative Potential Of Progressive Property, Ezra Rosser Jan 2013

The Ambition And Transformative Potential Of Progressive Property, Ezra Rosser

Ezra Rosser

The emerging progressive property school celebrates and finds its meaning in the social nature of property. Rejecting the idea that exclusion lies at the core of property law, progressive property scholars call for a reconsideration of the relationships owners and nonowners have with property and with each other. Despite these ambitions, progressive property scholarship has so far largely confined itself to questions of exclusion and access. This Essay argues that such an emphasis glosses over race-related acquisition and distribution problems that pervade American history and property law. The modest structural changes supported by progressive property scholars fail to account for …


Tribes, Land, And The Environment, 1d, Sarah Krakoff, Ezra Rosser Apr 2012

Tribes, Land, And The Environment, 1d, Sarah Krakoff, Ezra Rosser

Books

Legal and environmental concerns related to Indian law and tribal lands remain an understudied branch of both indigenous law and environmental law. Native American tribes have a far more complex relationship with the environment than is captured by the stereotype of Indians as environmental stewards. Meaningful tribal sovereignty requires that non-Indians recognize the right of Indians to determine their own relationship to the land and the environment. But tribes do not exist in a vacuum: in fact they are deeply affected by off-reservation activities and, similarly, tribal choices often have effects on nearby communities. This book brings together diverse essays …


Tribes, Land, And The Environment, Sarah Krakoff, Ezra Rosser Jan 2012

Tribes, Land, And The Environment, Sarah Krakoff, Ezra Rosser

Ezra Rosser

Legal and environmental concerns related to Indian law and tribal lands remain an understudied branch of both indigenous law and environmental law. Native American tribes have a far more complex relationship with the environment than is captured by the stereotype of Indians as environmental stewards. Meaningful tribal sovereignty requires that non-Indians recognize the right of Indians to determine their own relationship to the land and the environment. But tribes do not exist in a vacuum: in fact they are deeply affected by off-reservation activities and, similarly, tribal choices often have effects on nearby communities. This book brings together diverse essays …


An Idea Of American Indian Land Justice: Examining Native Land Liberation In The New Progressive Era, Richael Faithful Jan 2011

An Idea Of American Indian Land Justice: Examining Native Land Liberation In The New Progressive Era, Richael Faithful

Articles in Law Reviews & Journals

This article is inspired by Professor Robert Odawi Porter’s remarks during the 2009 D.C. Federal Indian Bar conference in which he outlined a seemingly radical proposal for “land liberation” for American Indian tribes – the abandonment of United States trusteeship over tribal land, and return of title and associated rights to numerous tribes who have lost their land due to nefarious governmental policies and bad deals. In an effort to bridge Porter’s visionary legal viewpoint with renowned economist and philosopher, Amartya Sen’s recent visionary contribution on justice, An Idea of American Indian Land Justice, helps revive an Indian law, critical …


Ahistorical Indians And Reservation Resources, Ezra Rosser Jan 2010

Ahistorical Indians And Reservation Resources, Ezra Rosser

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

The article is an in-depth exploration of the impacts of an Indian tribe's decision to pursue an environmentally destructive form of economic development. The history of Navajo Nation's coal leasing provides the background for the tribe's recent proposal to build a coal-fired power plant and the controversies surrounding the proposal and the environmental review process.


Anticipating De Soto: Allotment Of Indian Reservations And The Dangers Of Land-Titling, Ezra Rosser Jan 2010

Anticipating De Soto: Allotment Of Indian Reservations And The Dangers Of Land-Titling, Ezra Rosser

Ezra Rosser

This chapter uses the disastrous allotment experience of Indian tribes to question the transformative power of land-titling for the poor as advocated by Hernando de Soto. For Indians, allotment era land-titling resulted in loss of land and hardship, all reflective of non-Indian desires for the land and an unwillingness to acknowledge the rights of Indians to govern themselves. The chapter ends with a brief discussion of the champas of El Salvador and the potential loss in terms of housing for the poor if de Soto’s ideas are implemented without some protection against sales to the wealthy.


Assumptions Regarding Indians And Judicial Humility: Thoughts From A Property Law Lens, Ezra Rosser Jan 2009

Assumptions Regarding Indians And Judicial Humility: Thoughts From A Property Law Lens, Ezra Rosser

Ezra Rosser

Negative assumptions regarding Indians can be found in the recent decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, and attention to these assumptions is required if courts are to base their decisions on how Indians and non-Indians actually impact each other. This brief article uses a property and liability rules framework to argue for judicial restraint when considering cases that could limit tribal sovereignty.


Assumptions Regarding Indians And Judicial Humility: Thoughts From A Property Law Lens, Ezra Rosser Jan 2009

Assumptions Regarding Indians And Judicial Humility: Thoughts From A Property Law Lens, Ezra Rosser

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Negative assumptions regarding Indians can be found in the recent decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, and attention to these assumptions is required if courts are to base their decisions on how Indians and non-Indians actually impact each other. This brief article uses a property and liability rules framework to argue for judicial restraint when considering cases that could limit tribal sovereignty.


Could Litigation Help Torres Strait Islanders Deal With Climate Impacts?, Donna Green, Kirsty Ruddock Jan 2009

Could Litigation Help Torres Strait Islanders Deal With Climate Impacts?, Donna Green, Kirsty Ruddock

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Customary Law: The Way Things Were, Codified, Ezra Rosser Jan 2008

Customary Law: The Way Things Were, Codified, Ezra Rosser

Ezra Rosser

Frequently referred to as customary law, the unique traditions and customs of different Native American tribes are cited by their tribal courts as authoritative and binding law. The recent use of customary law as a mechanism for deciding individual cases is not uniform among tribal court systems as it differs depending upon which tribe's judges are working to place custom into contemporary judicial analysis. Understanding the present role of customary law in tribal law requires first understanding the nature of customary law and then understanding how it is being used. The effect of customary law is dependent upon the place …