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Full-Text Articles in Law

Toil Of The Firestarters, Peter A. Alces Sep 2019

Toil Of The Firestarters, Peter A. Alces

Peter A. Alces

No abstract provided.


Roundtable – Teaching Human Rights: Challenges And Best Practices, Shayna Plaut, Kristi Kenyon, Joel Pruce, William Simmons Sep 2017

Roundtable – Teaching Human Rights: Challenges And Best Practices, Shayna Plaut, Kristi Kenyon, Joel Pruce, William Simmons

Joel Pruce

Over the past 20 years, courses addressing human rights have grown dramatically at both the undergraduate and graduate levels worldwide. Many of these courses are housed in specific disciplines, focus on specific issues, and require practical experience in the form of internships/practicums. Amid this growth there is a need to reflect on teaching human rights including the challenges, fears, and best practices. Recognizing that education takes place inside and outside a classroom, this roundtable brings together scholars teaching human rights in a variety of settings to examine the current state of university human rights education. This includes a discussion ...


The Analytic Classroom, Todd E. Pettys Jan 2013

The Analytic Classroom, Todd E. Pettys

Todd E. Pettys

This article proposes a dramatic shift in law schools’ approach to teaching doctrinal courses. The proposal flows in large part from three separate developments: (1) the rise of strong economic headwinds in the market for legal education; (2) the emergence of empirical evidence that law schools are falling short of their goal of equipping students with powerful analytic abilities that transcend the particular doctrinal frameworks law schools teach; and (3) the incipient revolution in higher education, with prestigious universities now aggressively pursuing the opportunity to provide the public with free or low-cost access to many of their courses through the ...


Teaching Law In The University – Shaping Future Generations, Jack Tsen-Ta Lee Nov 2011

Teaching Law In The University – Shaping Future Generations, Jack Tsen-Ta Lee

Jack Tsen-Ta LEE

This paper, which was written for the book The Practice of Law (Singapore: LexisNexis, 2011), gives an insight into what teaching law in a Singapore university is like from the perspective of a young law academic. It considers various aspects of an academic’s job – research and writing, teaching, and administration, for instance – and provides pointers on how one might best position oneself for an academic career.


Teaching With Emotion: Enriching The Educational Experience Of First-Year Law Students, Grant H. Morris Jan 2010

Teaching With Emotion: Enriching The Educational Experience Of First-Year Law Students, Grant H. Morris

Grant H Morris

Through the case method and Socratic dialogue, first year law students are taught to develop critical legal analytic skills–to “think like a lawyer.” Those skills, however, are primarily, if not entirely, intellectual. This article discusses the need to address emotional issues in educating law students. Unlike other articles, my article does not merely urge professors to raise such issues in their classes and discuss them analytically. Rather, I want students to actually experience emotion in the classroom setting as they discuss various fact situations and the legal principles involved in the resolution of disputes involving those facts. Law students ...


Regulation By Markets And Higher Education, Benedict Sheehy Dec 2009

Regulation By Markets And Higher Education, Benedict Sheehy

Benedict Sheehy

Markets have a number of uses. One increasingly important use by politicians is as a means of regulating the supply and distribution of goods and services formerly supplied and distributed by governments on non-market bases. The use of markets as a regulator of higher education is not novel. However, the increased reliance on markets as a regulator of higher education is an on-going experiment with certain predictable failures. This article explores the uses of the market in the supply and distribution of higher education and weighs it against the stated policy objectives, with particular attention to the application proposed in ...