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Against Bankruptcy: Public Litigation Values Versus The Endless Quest For Global Peace In Mass Litigation, Abbe Gluck, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, Adam Zimmerman Feb 2024

Against Bankruptcy: Public Litigation Values Versus The Endless Quest For Global Peace In Mass Litigation, Abbe Gluck, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, Adam Zimmerman

Scholarly Works

Can bankruptcy court solve a public health crisis? Should the goal of “global peace” in complex lawsuits trump traditional litigation values in a system grounded in public participation and jurisdictional redundancy? How much leeway do courts have to innovate civil procedure?

These questions have finally reached the Supreme Court in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma L.P., the $6 billion bankruptcy that purports to achieve global resolution of all current and future opioids suits against the company and its former family owners, the Sacklers. The case provides a critical opportunity to reflect on what is lost when parties in mass torts find …


Systemic Failures In Health Care Oversight, Julie L. Campbell Jan 2024

Systemic Failures In Health Care Oversight, Julie L. Campbell

Georgia Law Review

Hospitals are intentionally shirking their duty to identify and report incompetent medical practitioners, and it is causing catastrophic injuries to patients. Why are hospitals doing this? Two decades of health care reforms have changed the way physicians and hospitals interact in the U.S. health care system, and as a result, the traditional health care oversight tools no longer work to ensure physician competence. With three out of four physicians now employees of hospitals or health care systems, hospitals have become the guardians of both the internal and external warning systems designed to flag incompetent practitioners. As the guardians, hospitals are …


Challenging The Criminalization Of Undocumented Drivers Through A Health-Justice Framework, Jason A. Cade Jan 2024

Challenging The Criminalization Of Undocumented Drivers Through A Health-Justice Framework, Jason A. Cade

Scholarly Works

States increasingly use driver’s license laws to further policy objectives unrelated to road safety. This symposium contribution employs a health justice lens to focus on one manifestation of this trend—state schemes that prohibit noncitizen residents from accessing driver’s licenses and then impose criminal sanctions for driving without authorization. Status-based no-license laws not only facilitate legally questionable enforcement of local immigration priorities but also impose structural inequities with long-term health consequences for immigrants and their family members, including US citizen children. Safe, reliable transportation is a significant social determinant of health for individuals, families, and communities. Applying a health justice lens …


Biased But Reasonable: Bias Under The Cover Of Standard Of Care, Maytal Gilboa Mar 2023

Biased But Reasonable: Bias Under The Cover Of Standard Of Care, Maytal Gilboa

Georgia Law Review

Inequities in the distribution of healthcare are widely acknowledged to plague the United States healthcare system. Controversies as to whether anti-discrimination law allows individuals to bring lawsuits with respect to implicit rather than intentional bias render negligence law an important avenue for redressing harms caused by implicit bias in medical care. Yet, as this Article argues, the focus of negligence law on medical standards of care to define the boundaries of healthcare providers’ legal duty of care prevents the law from adequately deterring implicit bias and leaves patients harmed by biased treatment decisions without redress for their losses, so long …


National Federation Of Independent Business V. Sebelius, 567 U.S. 519 (2012), Elizabeth Weeks, Mary Ann Chirba, Alice A. Noble Jan 2023

National Federation Of Independent Business V. Sebelius, 567 U.S. 519 (2012), Elizabeth Weeks, Mary Ann Chirba, Alice A. Noble

Scholarly Works

In National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, decided in 2012, twenty-six states as well as private individuals and an organization of independent businesses challenged the constitutionality of two key components of the Affordable Care Act. The Court upheld the individual mandate but converted the Medicaid eligibility expansion from mandatory to optional for states. Elizabeth Weeks’ feminist rewrite breaks down the public law-private law distinction to get beyond the traditional view of health insurance as a commercial product providing individual financial protection against risk and instead to view it as effecting a risk pool premised on cross-subsidization of the health-care …


Telemedicine Across Borders: Entrenched Issues Exposed By Covid-19, Richmond B. Wrinkle May 2022

Telemedicine Across Borders: Entrenched Issues Exposed By Covid-19, Richmond B. Wrinkle

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Hiv No Longer A Death Sentence But Still A Life Sentence: The Constitutionality Of Hiv Criminalization Under The Eighth Amendment, Lauren Taylor Jan 2022

Hiv No Longer A Death Sentence But Still A Life Sentence: The Constitutionality Of Hiv Criminalization Under The Eighth Amendment, Lauren Taylor

Georgia Law Review

When the HIV/AIDS epidemic began in the 1980s in the United States, there was mass confusion and hysteria regarding HIV transmission and prevention, leading many states to enact HIV criminalization statutes to prosecute persons living with HIV who either exposed another person to HIV or put someone in danger of being exposed to HIV. Yet, almost forty years later, these statutes are still used to criminalize and control the behaviors of people living with HIV, and in some cases, impose lengthy prison sentences hinging on the possibility of exposure. These HIV criminalization statutes and subsequent criminal cases often do not …


Righting A Reproductive Wrong: A Statutory Tort Solution To Misrepresentation By Reproductive Tissue Providers, Yaniv Heled, Hillel Y. Levin, Timothy D. Lytton, Liza Vertinsky Jan 2022

Righting A Reproductive Wrong: A Statutory Tort Solution To Misrepresentation By Reproductive Tissue Providers, Yaniv Heled, Hillel Y. Levin, Timothy D. Lytton, Liza Vertinsky

Scholarly Works

Fraud, misrepresentation, and other unfair trade practices plague the market for human reproductive tissue. The sale of sperm, eggs, and embryos is virtually unregulated in almost all states, and courts have been inhospitable to victims. As a result, children are born with genetic disorders that impose extreme financial and personal hardship. Proposals for direct government oversight have, for the most part, failed to gain traction, and litigation has yielded inadequate remedies.

This Article assesses these problems and proposes model legislation that would eliminate doctrinal obstacles to holding unscrupulous reproductive tissue providers liable. By making it easier for parents to bring …


Systems Thinking And Global Health Governance, Elsie Hayford, Marice Ashe Sep 2021

Systems Thinking And Global Health Governance, Elsie Hayford, Marice Ashe

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Immunization Governance Challenges Exposed By Covid-19: Missing Standards In Vacccine Surveillance And Adverse Events Following Immunization (Aefis), Shawn H.E. Harmon, David Faour Sep 2021

Immunization Governance Challenges Exposed By Covid-19: Missing Standards In Vacccine Surveillance And Adverse Events Following Immunization (Aefis), Shawn H.E. Harmon, David Faour

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Excluding Non-Citizens From The Social Safety Net, Wendy E. Parmet Sep 2021

Excluding Non-Citizens From The Social Safety Net, Wendy E. Parmet

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Buffering Against Vicissitudes: The Role Of Social Insurance In The Covid-19 Pandemic And In Maintaining Economic Stability, Renée M. Landers Sep 2021

Buffering Against Vicissitudes: The Role Of Social Insurance In The Covid-19 Pandemic And In Maintaining Economic Stability, Renée M. Landers

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Re-Imagining Possibilities Of Governance For Global Health, Alicia Ely Yamin Sep 2021

Re-Imagining Possibilities Of Governance For Global Health, Alicia Ely Yamin

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Introduction: The Future Of Global Health Governance, Elizabeth Weeks, Anish Patel Sep 2021

Introduction: The Future Of Global Health Governance, Elizabeth Weeks, Anish Patel

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


One Child Town: The Health Care Exceptionalism Case Against Agglomeration Economies, Elizabeth Weeks Jan 2021

One Child Town: The Health Care Exceptionalism Case Against Agglomeration Economies, Elizabeth Weeks

Scholarly Works

This Article offers an extended rebuttal to the suggestion to move residents away from dying communities to places with greater economic promise. Rural America, arguably, is one of those dying places. A host of strategies aim to shore up those communities and make them more economically viable. But one might ask, “Why bother?” In similar vein, David Schleicher’s provocative 2017 Yale Law Journal article, Stuck! The Law and Economics of Residential Stagnation urged dismantling a host of state and local government laws operating as barriers to migration by Americans from failing economies to robust agglomeration economies. But Schleicher said little …


Bring The Masks And Sanitizer: The Surprising Bipartisan Consensus About Safety Measures For In-Person Voting During The Coronavirus Pandemic, Joshua A. Douglas, Michael A. Zilis Jan 2021

Bring The Masks And Sanitizer: The Surprising Bipartisan Consensus About Safety Measures For In-Person Voting During The Coronavirus Pandemic, Joshua A. Douglas, Michael A. Zilis

Georgia Law Review

Requiring masks at the polls might implicate a clash
between two vital rights: the constitutional right to vote and the
right to protect one’s health. Yet the debate during the 2020
election over requirements to wear a mask at the polls obscured
one key fact: a majority of Americans supported a mask
mandate for voting. That is the new insight we provide in this
Essay: when surveyed, Americans strongly supported safety
measures for in-person voting, and that support was high
regardless of partisanship. One implication of our results is
that by making some widely supported safety modifications,
state election officials …


Private Insurance Limits And Responses, Elizabeth Weeks Aug 2020

Private Insurance Limits And Responses, Elizabeth Weeks

Scholarly Works

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed a number of existing flaws in the United States’ patchwork approach to paying for and providing access to medical care. Shelter-in-place orders, social distancing, and other public health strategies employed to address the pandemic spawned a global recession, causing rapid and high unemployment rates in many countries. The U.S. unemployment rate peaked in April 2020 at 14.7%, higher than in any previous period since World War II. The United States has long hewed an anachronistic policy of relying heavily on private employers to provide health insurance to a substantial portion of the population. Those who are …


Private Schools' Role And Rights In Setting Vaccination Policy: A Constitutional And Statutory Puzzle, Hillel Y. Levin May 2020

Private Schools' Role And Rights In Setting Vaccination Policy: A Constitutional And Statutory Puzzle, Hillel Y. Levin

Scholarly Works

Measles and other vaccine-preventable childhood diseases are making a comeback, as a growing number of parents are electing not to vaccinate their children. May private schools refuse admission to these students? This deceptively simple question raises complex issues of First Amendment law and statutory interpretation, and it also has implications for other current hot-button issues in constitutional law, including whether private schools may discriminate against LGBTQ students. This Article is the first to address the issue of private schools’ rights to exclude unvaccinated children. It finds that the answer is “it depends.” It also offers a model law that states …


Private Schools' Role And Rights In Setting Vaccination Policy: A Constitutional And Statutory Puzzle, Hillel Y. Levin Jan 2020

Private Schools' Role And Rights In Setting Vaccination Policy: A Constitutional And Statutory Puzzle, Hillel Y. Levin

Scholarly Works

Measles and other vaccine-preventable childhood diseases are making a comeback, as a growing number of parents are electing not to vaccinate their children. May private schools refuse admission to these students? This deceptively simple question raises complex issues of First Amendment law and statutory interpretation, and it also has implications for other current hot-button issues in constitutional law, including whether private schools may discriminate against LGBTQ students. This Article is the first to address the issue of private schools’ rights to exclude unvaccinated children. It finds that the answer is “it depends.” It also offers a model law that states …


Designing Policy Solutions To Build A Healthier Rural America, Sameer Vohra, Carolyn Ponter, Amanda Fogleman, Thomas Albers, Anish Patel, Elizabeth Weeks Jan 2020

Designing Policy Solutions To Build A Healthier Rural America, Sameer Vohra, Carolyn Ponter, Amanda Fogleman, Thomas Albers, Anish Patel, Elizabeth Weeks

Scholarly Works

Disparities exist in the livelihood and opportunities for people living in America’s rural communities. These differences result in a much sicker rural America compared to its urban counterpart. Rural counties have higher rates of smoking, obesity, child poverty, and teen pregnancies than urban counties. More uninsured adults live in rural areas, causing rural hospitals to close and/or cut vital services such as obstetrics care. Rural hospitals also provide fewer mental health services. The result is Americans living in rural areas are more likely to die from the five leading causes of death than those living in urban areas: heart disease, …


Stopping The Resurgence Of Vaccine-Preventable Childhood Diseases: Policy, Politics, And Law, Hillel Y. Levin, Stacie Patrice Kershner, Timothy D. Lytton, Daniel Salmon, Saad B. Omer Jan 2020

Stopping The Resurgence Of Vaccine-Preventable Childhood Diseases: Policy, Politics, And Law, Hillel Y. Levin, Stacie Patrice Kershner, Timothy D. Lytton, Daniel Salmon, Saad B. Omer

Scholarly Works

Mandatory vaccination programs in the United States are generally successful, but their continued success is under threat. The ever-increasing number of parents who opt their children out of vaccination recommendations has caused severe outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. Public health advocates have pushed for changes to state laws, but their efforts have generally been unsuccessful. We suggest that their lack of success is due to public health advocates’ failures to contend with the features of the political system that impede change and to propose reforms that are ethically defensible, efficacious, and politically feasible. Based on our earlier public health studies, ethical …


Designing Policy Solutions To Build A Healthier Rural America, Elizabeth Weeks, Sameer Vohra, Carolyn Pointer, Amanda Fogleman, Thomas Albers, Anish Patel Jan 2020

Designing Policy Solutions To Build A Healthier Rural America, Elizabeth Weeks, Sameer Vohra, Carolyn Pointer, Amanda Fogleman, Thomas Albers, Anish Patel

Scholarly Works

Disparities exist in the livelihood and opportunities for people living in America’s rural communities. These differences result in a much sicker rural America compared to its urban counterpart. Rural counties have higher rates of smoking, obesity, child poverty, and teen pregnancies than urban counties.1 More uninsured adults live in rural areas, causing rural hospitals to close and/or cut vital services such as obstetrics care.2 Rural hospitals also provide fewer mental health services.3 The result is Americans living in rural areas are more likely to die from the five leading causes of death than those living in urban areas: heart disease, …


Off With Their Heads! How China's Controversial Human Head-Transplant Procedure Exceeds The Parameters Of International Ethical Standards In Human Experimentation, Deena Agamy Jul 2019

Off With Their Heads! How China's Controversial Human Head-Transplant Procedure Exceeds The Parameters Of International Ethical Standards In Human Experimentation, Deena Agamy

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Tacos, Tequila, And Tainted Alcohol? An Examination Of The Tainted Alcohol Problem In Mexico And What It Means For The American Tourist, Tammy Le Jul 2019

Tacos, Tequila, And Tainted Alcohol? An Examination Of The Tainted Alcohol Problem In Mexico And What It Means For The American Tourist, Tammy Le

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Financial Impact Of The Opioid Crisis On Local Government: Quantifying Costs For Litigation And Policymaking, Elizabeth Weeks Jan 2019

Financial Impact Of The Opioid Crisis On Local Government: Quantifying Costs For Litigation And Policymaking, Elizabeth Weeks

Scholarly Works

The opioids epidemic has had a significant impact on individuals and communities, including local governments responsible for serving and protecting those affected individuals. This is the first study of its kind to consider whether those local government costs are quantifiable, a question that has salience both for pending opioid litigation in federal and state courts and for local planning and budgeting decisions. This article first provides a detailed description of the opioid litigation landscape, including the federal multidistrict litigation (MDL) in Ohio, the Native American tribes’ actions, and various procedural and other hurdles that local government plaintiffs face in seeking …


Healthism In Tort Law, Elizabeth Weeks Jan 2019

Healthism In Tort Law, Elizabeth Weeks

Scholarly Works

This article draws on the author's recently published book, Healthism: Health Status Discrimination and the Law (with Jessica L. Roberts) (Cambridge University Press 2018), examining tort law doctrine and policy for examples of differential treatment of health status or behaviors. Just as scholars previously have drawn attention to discrimination based on race, sex, age, and other protected categories in tort law, the article urges similar examination of tort law's potential to discriminate against the unhealthy. The article discusses the potential for healthism in the reasonably prudent person standard of care, contributory negligence, assumption of the risk, noneconomic damages caps, impaired …


Teaching Tomorrow’S Lawyers Through A (Semi-) Generalist, (Mostly-) Individual Client Poverty Law Clinic: Reflections On Five Years Of The Community Health Law Partnership, Jason A. Cade Jan 2019

Teaching Tomorrow’S Lawyers Through A (Semi-) Generalist, (Mostly-) Individual Client Poverty Law Clinic: Reflections On Five Years Of The Community Health Law Partnership, Jason A. Cade

Scholarly Works

Design options when starting a live-client clinic from scratch can be somewhat overwhelming. Should the clinic focus on systemic impact or individual representation? Appellate work or hearings? Should the clinic specialize or cover multiple legal issues? Another set of issues concerns how the clinic should find and accept its clients, and whether students should have a role in the intake process. The list of choices goes on. In this Essay, written for the Georgia Law Review’s Online Issue celebrating 50 years of clinics at the University of Georgia School of Law, I describe how I have navigated these and other …


Regulatory Response To E-Cigarettes, Morgan Johnson May 2018

Regulatory Response To E-Cigarettes, Morgan Johnson

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide: Comparing And Contrasting Washington's Death With Dignity Act And Pharmacy Regulations After The Ninth Circuit's Decision In Stormans, Inc. V. Wiesman, Jared B. Magnuson Jan 2018

Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide: Comparing And Contrasting Washington's Death With Dignity Act And Pharmacy Regulations After The Ninth Circuit's Decision In Stormans, Inc. V. Wiesman, Jared B. Magnuson

Georgia Law Review

In 2015, the Ninth Circuit held in Stormans, Inc. v.
Wiesmani that the Christian owners of a pharmacy in
Washington who objected to carrying and distributing
emergency contraception because it conflicted with their
religious beliefs must distribute those drugs under the
state's pharmacy regulations. Washington's
Pharmacist Responsibility Rule and Delivery Rule
require pharmacy owners to carry and distribute
emergency contraception but do not allow any
exemptions for owners or pharmacists who object to
doing so for conscience reasons. At the same time,
Washington's Death with Dignity Act makes physician-
assisted suicide legal in the state and contains a broad
exemption …


Increasing Vaccination Rates Without Eliminating Nonmedical Exemptions, Hillel Y. Levin, Timothy D. Lytton Jan 2018

Increasing Vaccination Rates Without Eliminating Nonmedical Exemptions, Hillel Y. Levin, Timothy D. Lytton

Popular Media

This essay on shifting states' incentives to reduce nonmedical exemptions while respecting the choice not to vaccinate, is based on a forthcoming article, A Model Law for Nonmedical Immunization Exemptions Using the Least Restrictive Means, coauthored by Daniel A. Salmon, Stacie Kershner, Timothy D. Lytton, Hillel Y. Levin, Claire Hannan, and Saad B. Omer.