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Drug Approval In A Learning Health System, W. Nicholson Price Jul 2018

Drug Approval In A Learning Health System, W. Nicholson Price

Articles

The current system of FDA approval seems to make few happy. Some argue FDA approves drugs too slowly; others too quickly. Many agree that FDA—and the health system generally—should gather information after drugs are approved to learn how well they work and how safe they are. This is hard to do. FDA has its own surveillance systems, but those systems face substantial limitations in practical use. Drug companies can also conduct their own studies, but have little incentive to do so, and often fail to fulfil study commitments made to FDA. Proposals to improve this dynamic often suggest gathering more …


Where Babies And Death-Row Inmates Intersect: Is Arbitrary Agency Decision-Making Supported Under Existing Law?, Lisa C. Blanton Bs., Mj. Sep 2013

Where Babies And Death-Row Inmates Intersect: Is Arbitrary Agency Decision-Making Supported Under Existing Law?, Lisa C. Blanton Bs., Mj.

Lisa C. Blanton BS., MJ.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the executive branch regulatory agency primarily responsible for protecting the nation’s drug products.[1] The FDA recently made highly inconsistent decisions surrounding a new drug for the prevention of pre-term birth, Makena™ (hydroxyprogesterone caproate). During a lengthy approval process, FDA made laudatory public announcements and demonstrated high programmatic preference to expedite approval of Makena by assigning orphan status[2] and granting accelerated “fast-track” approval time-frames.[3] Despite these actions, within weeks of the approval, the FDA issued aggressive public statements against the product’s efficacy and safety and made supportive comments about a non-FDA …


Improving Post-Approval Risk Surveillance For Drugs: Active Post-Market Risk Identification, Matthew Gordon Jan 2008

Improving Post-Approval Risk Surveillance For Drugs: Active Post-Market Risk Identification, Matthew Gordon

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

Pre-approval clinical trials cannot possibly ensure that a drug will not have disastrous side effects once it arrives on the market. Post-approval drug safety data gathering was put in place to address this problem, but as implemented, it has not proven to be as effective as hoped. Congress recently overhauled the legislation regarding post-approval drug risk identification, and in doing so made a deliberate decision to put much of the burden of post-approval drug surveillance on the FDA through data mining. Further, the legislation gave the FDA the power to require post-approval clinical trials from drug makers only in limited …