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The Value Of Valor: Money, Medals And Military Labor, Mateo Taussig-Rubbo Nov 2017

The Value Of Valor: Money, Medals And Military Labor, Mateo Taussig-Rubbo

Mateo Taussig-Rubbo

The United States Supreme Court recently overturned the Stolen Valor Act on the grounds that the law’s blanket prohibition on falsely claiming to have received a military medal or decoration violated the First Amendment right to free speech. This Article uses the controversy provoked by the law to explore the implications of offering compensation for military service in the form of medals. How is compensation in medals related to monetary compensation? Querying the distinctions between money and medals — and the ways in which the boundaries around medals are drawn and policed — offers a means of considering the forms …


The Value Of Valor: Money, Medals And Military Labor, Mateo Taussig-Rubbo Jan 2012

The Value Of Valor: Money, Medals And Military Labor, Mateo Taussig-Rubbo

Journal Articles

The United States Supreme Court recently overturned the Stolen Valor Act on the grounds that the law’s blanket prohibition on falsely claiming to have received a military medal or decoration violated the First Amendment right to free speech. This Article uses the controversy provoked by the law to explore the implications of offering compensation for military service in the form of medals. How is compensation in medals related to monetary compensation? Querying the distinctions between money and medals — and the ways in which the boundaries around medals are drawn and policed — offers a means of considering the forms …


Is Honor Tangible Property?, James Santiago Jan 2012

Is Honor Tangible Property?, James Santiago

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform Caveat

United States Marine Corps Sergeant Dakota Meyer said, “When they told me that I would be receiving the Medal of Honor I told them that I didn’t want it, because I don’t feel like a hero.” This statement reflects the feelings of many real war heroes who deserve and are given recognition yet feel that they are unworthy of such accolades. Unfortunately, there are also individuals who want the recognition of being a war hero but lie about having served. Nevertheless, the First Amendment will continue to guarantee the freedom of speech of those who lie about unearned military honors …


Brief Of The Intellectual Property Amicus Brief Clinic Of The University Of New Hampshire School Of Law As Amicus Curiae In Support Of Neither Party, Susan M. Richey, John M. Greabe, Keith M. Harrison, J. Jeffrey Hawley Dec 2011

Brief Of The Intellectual Property Amicus Brief Clinic Of The University Of New Hampshire School Of Law As Amicus Curiae In Support Of Neither Party, Susan M. Richey, John M. Greabe, Keith M. Harrison, J. Jeffrey Hawley

Law Faculty Scholarship

Amicus brief filed by the Intellectual Property Amicus Brief Clinic of the University of New Hampshire School of Law with the United States Court Of Appeals For The Ninth Circuit regarding United States v. Xavier Alvarez, Docket No. 11-210


The Constitutional Status Of Speech About Oneself, R. George Wright Jan 2011

The Constitutional Status Of Speech About Oneself, R. George Wright

Cleveland State Law Review

We have accepted above the well-established idea that speech about oneself that is also intended to convey some sort of political idea or to address some matter of public concern can typically be distinguished from speech about oneself with no such further intent. On this basis, we have argued, contrary to recent contentions, that the latter sort of speech-speech that is "merely" about the self, or about one's merely personal or private concerns-should not generally qualify for any sort of elevated free speech protection. Fundamentally, this is because such speech does not systematically promote any of the consensually recognized and …