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First Amendment

2003

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Full-Text Articles in Law

You Can't Ask (Or Say) That: The First Amendment And Civil Rights Restrictions On Decisionmaker Speech, Helen L. Norton Dec 2003

You Can't Ask (Or Say) That: The First Amendment And Civil Rights Restrictions On Decisionmaker Speech, Helen L. Norton

Faculty Scholarship

Many antidiscrimination statutes limit speech by employers, landlords, lenders, and other decisionmakers in one or both of two ways: (1) by prohibiting queries soliciting information about an applicant's disability, sexual orientation, marital status, or other protected characteristic; and (2) by proscribing discriminatory advertisements or other expressions of discriminatory preference for applicants based on race, sex, age, sexual orientation, or other protected characteristics.

This Article explores how we might think about these laws for First Amendment purposes. Part I outlines the range of civil rights restrictions on decisionmaker speech, while Part II identifies the antidiscrimination and privacy concerns that drive their …


Contents, First Amendment Law Review Dec 2003

Contents, First Amendment Law Review

First Amendment Law Review

No abstract provided.


Why A State Exclusion Of Religious Schools From School Choice Programs Is Unconstitutional, Thomas C. Berg Dec 2003

Why A State Exclusion Of Religious Schools From School Choice Programs Is Unconstitutional, Thomas C. Berg

First Amendment Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Historical Context Of The Failed Federal Blaine Amendment Of 1876, Ward M. Mcafee Dec 2003

The Historical Context Of The Failed Federal Blaine Amendment Of 1876, Ward M. Mcafee

First Amendment Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Theology Of The Blaine Amendments, Richard W. Garnett Dec 2003

The Theology Of The Blaine Amendments, Richard W. Garnett

First Amendment Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Blaine Debate: Must States Fund Religious Schools, Laura S. Underkuffler Dec 2003

The Blaine Debate: Must States Fund Religious Schools, Laura S. Underkuffler

First Amendment Law Review

No abstract provided.


Blaming Blaine: Understanding The Blaine Amendment And The No-Funding Principle, Steven K. Green Dec 2003

Blaming Blaine: Understanding The Blaine Amendment And The No-Funding Principle, Steven K. Green

First Amendment Law Review

No abstract provided.


Blaine Amendments, Anti-Catholicism And Catholic Dogma, Marc D. Stern Dec 2003

Blaine Amendments, Anti-Catholicism And Catholic Dogma, Marc D. Stern

First Amendment Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reconstructing The Blaine Amendments, Frederick Mark Gedicks Dec 2003

Reconstructing The Blaine Amendments, Frederick Mark Gedicks

First Amendment Law Review

No abstract provided.


Say Cheese: The Constitutionality Of State-Mandated Airtime On Public Broadcasting Stations In Wisconsin, Andrew D. Cotlar Dec 2003

Say Cheese: The Constitutionality Of State-Mandated Airtime On Public Broadcasting Stations In Wisconsin, Andrew D. Cotlar

Federal Communications Law Journal

Last year, the State of Wisconsin passed legislation which would require statechartered public broadcasting television networks to carry political advertising for candidates free of charge. In this article, Andrew Cotlar raises many concerns about the wisdom of such legislation and the impact this trend may have on public broadcasters throughout the nation. The author begins by analyzing the current position of the law on political access requirements, at both federal and state levels, and then argues that the public television stations should continue to be free to exercise substantial editorial discretion. The Article proceeds to critique the Wisconsin statute as …


Boring Lessons: Defining The Limits Of A Teacher's First Amendment Right To Speak Through The Curriculum, R. Weston Donehower Dec 2003

Boring Lessons: Defining The Limits Of A Teacher's First Amendment Right To Speak Through The Curriculum, R. Weston Donehower

Michigan Law Review

Margaret Boring's classes were anything but boring. She taught Advanced Acting at Owen High School in rural Buncombe County, North Carolina, and her classes' performances regularly won regional and state awards. In the fall of 1991, Ms. Boring chose a controversial play, Independence by Lee Blessing, for her students to perform. Independence "powerfully depicts the dynamics within a dysfunctional, single-parent family - a divorced mother and three daughters; one a lesbian, another pregnant with an illegitimate child." Prior to the first performance at the school, Ms. Boring informed the principal of the play's title but not its content. After the …


The "Horizontal Effect" Of Constitutional Rights, Stephen Gardbaum Dec 2003

The "Horizontal Effect" Of Constitutional Rights, Stephen Gardbaum

Michigan Law Review

Among the most fundamental issues in constitutional law is the scope of application of individual rights provisions and, in particular, their reach into the private sphere. This issue is also currently one of the most important and hotly debated in comparative constitutional law, where it is known under the rubric of "vertical" and "horizontal effect." These alternatives refer to whether constitutional rights regulate only the conduct of governmental actors in their dealings with private individuals (vertical) or also relations between private individuals (horizontal). In recent years, the horizontal position has been adopted to varying degrees, and after systematic scholarly and …


Eldred's Aftermath: Tradition, The Copyright Clause, And The Constitutionalization Of Fair Use, Stephen M. Mcjohn Oct 2003

Eldred's Aftermath: Tradition, The Copyright Clause, And The Constitutionalization Of Fair Use, Stephen M. Mcjohn

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

Eldred v. Ashcroft offered the Supreme Court broad issues about the scope of Congress's constitutional power to legislate in the area of intellectual property. In 1998, Congress added twenty years to the term of all copyrights, both existing and future copyrights. But for this term extension, works created during the 1920s and 1930s would be entering the public domain. Now such works will remain under copyright until 2018 and beyond. Eldred v. Ashcroft rejected two challenges to the constitutionality of the copyright extension. The first challenge contended that Congress had exceeded its power to grant copyrights for "limited Times" in …


Constitutional Law—True Threat Doctrine And Public School Speech—An Expensive View Of A School's Authority To Discipline Allegedly Threatening Student Speech Arising Off Campus. Doe V. Pulaski County Special School District, 306 F.3d 616 (8th Cir. 2002)., William Bird Oct 2003

Constitutional Law—True Threat Doctrine And Public School Speech—An Expensive View Of A School's Authority To Discipline Allegedly Threatening Student Speech Arising Off Campus. Doe V. Pulaski County Special School District, 306 F.3d 616 (8th Cir. 2002)., William Bird

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Republican Party Of Minnesota V. White: The Lifting Of Judicial Speech Restraint, David B. Bogard Oct 2003

Republican Party Of Minnesota V. White: The Lifting Of Judicial Speech Restraint, David B. Bogard

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Section 1: Moot Court, Locke V. Davey, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law, William & Mary Law School Sep 2003

Section 1: Moot Court, Locke V. Davey, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law, William & Mary Law School

Supreme Court Preview

No abstract provided.


Section 5: First Amendment & Election Law, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law, William & Mary Law School Sep 2003

Section 5: First Amendment & Election Law, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law, William & Mary Law School

Supreme Court Preview

No abstract provided.


Academics, Public Employee Speech, And The Public University, Jennifer Elrod Sep 2003

Academics, Public Employee Speech, And The Public University, Jennifer Elrod

Buffalo Public Interest Law Journal

No abstract provided.


James Madison, John Witherspoon, And Oliver Cowdery: The First Amendment And The 134th Section Of The Doctrine And Covenants, Rodney K. Smith Sep 2003

James Madison, John Witherspoon, And Oliver Cowdery: The First Amendment And The 134th Section Of The Doctrine And Covenants, Rodney K. Smith

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


First Amendment Equal Protection: On Discretion, Inequality, And Participation, Daniel P. Tokaji Jun 2003

First Amendment Equal Protection: On Discretion, Inequality, And Participation, Daniel P. Tokaji

Michigan Law Review

The tension between equality and discretion lies at the heart of some of the most vexing questions of constitutional law. The considerable discretion that many official decisionmakers wield raises the spectre that violations of equality norms will sometimes escape detection. This is true in a variety of settings, whether discretion lies over speakers' access to public fora, implementation of the death penalty, or the recounting of votes. Is the First Amendment violated, for example, when a city ordinance gives local officials broad discretion to determine the conditions under which political demonstrations may take place? Is equal protection denied where the …


The Role Of The Federal Communications Commission On The Path From The Vast Wasteland To The Fertile Plain, Kathleen Q. Abernathy May 2003

The Role Of The Federal Communications Commission On The Path From The Vast Wasteland To The Fertile Plain, Kathleen Q. Abernathy

Federal Communications Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Revisiting The Vast Wasteland, Newton N. Minow, Fred H. Cate May 2003

Revisiting The Vast Wasteland, Newton N. Minow, Fred H. Cate

Federal Communications Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Serpentine Wall Of Separation, John Witte Jr. May 2003

The Serpentine Wall Of Separation, John Witte Jr.

Michigan Law Review

The task of separating the secular from the religious in education is one of magnitude, intricacy, and delicacy, Justice Jackson wrote, concurring in McCollum v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court's first religion in public schools case. "To lay down a sweeping constitutional doctrine" of absolute separation of church and state "is to decree a uniform . . . unchanging standard for countless school boards representing and serving highly localized groups which not only differ from each other but which themselves from time to time change attitudes." If we persist in this experiment, Justice Jackson warned his brethren, "we are …


Proselytizers, Pamphleteers, Pests, And Other First Amendment Champions: Watchtower Bible And Tract Society Of New York, Inc. V. Village Of Stratton, Kathryn Lusty May 2003

Proselytizers, Pamphleteers, Pests, And Other First Amendment Champions: Watchtower Bible And Tract Society Of New York, Inc. V. Village Of Stratton, Kathryn Lusty

Brigham Young University Journal of Public Law

No abstract provided.


Civil Liberties And The Terrorism Prevention Paradigm: The Guilt By Association Critique, Robert M. Chesney May 2003

Civil Liberties And The Terrorism Prevention Paradigm: The Guilt By Association Critique, Robert M. Chesney

Michigan Law Review

Faysal Galab is a twenty-seven-year-old American citizen of Yemeni descent who was born and raised in Buffalo, New York. He is married, has three children, and used to run a gas station in the Buffalo suburb of Lackawanna. Perhaps you have heard of him; he will be spending some or all of the next ten years in federal prison because in spring of 2001 he and six other Lackawanna residents traveled to Afghanistan and trained with Al Qaeda.


The Campain-Finance Crucible: Is Laissez Fair?, Jamin B. Raskin May 2003

The Campain-Finance Crucible: Is Laissez Fair?, Jamin B. Raskin

Michigan Law Review

The 2001 passage of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act ("BCRA"), popularly known as "McCain-Feingold," set the stage for a momentous constitutional conflict in the United States Supreme Court in the 2003-04 Term. Among other things, the new legislation bans "soft money" contributions to the national political parties by corporations, labor unions, and individuals; prohibits state parties that are authorized to accept such contributions to spend the proceeds on activities related to federal elections; forbids federal candidates to participate in raising soft money; doubles the amount of "hard money" an individual can contribute in a federal election from $1,000 to $2,000 …


Discussing The First Amendment, Christina E. Wells May 2003

Discussing The First Amendment, Christina E. Wells

Michigan Law Review

Since the First Amendment's inception, Americans have agreed that free expression is foundational to our democratic way of life. Though we agree on this much, we have rarely agreed on much else regarding the appropriate parameters of free expression. Is the First Amendment absolute or does it allow some regulation of speech? Should the First Amendment protect offensive speech, pornography, flag-burning? Why do we protect speech - to promote the search for truth, to promote self-governance, or to protect individual autonomy?2 History is rife with disagreements regarding these issues to which there are no definitive answers. Certainly, the text of …


Ifeminism, Ashlie Warnick May 2003

Ifeminism, Ashlie Warnick

Michigan Law Review

Laws should be judged not by their words or intentions, but by their effects and consequences. When government enacts laws designed to benefit one group, society should judge those laws first by examining whether they have, in practice, provided a net benefit to the law's intended beneficiaries. Next, any such benefit must be weighed against the costs imposed on the rest of society. If the benefits outweigh the costs, this is a socially efficient law. Government should repeal a law when the costs it imposes outweigh its benefits. When laws do not provide a net benefit to the group they …


Cyberdemons: Regulating A Truly World-Wide Web, Andrew P. Lycans May 2003

Cyberdemons: Regulating A Truly World-Wide Web, Andrew P. Lycans

Michigan Law Review

In the decade leading up to the twenty-first century, the number of Internet-related legal disputes grew exponentially. This growth continues into the new millennium, introducing old problems in a new context. For instance, in the field of copyright, Eric Eldred, the operator of a website dedicated to posting literary works already in the public domain, challenged the Copyright Term Extension Act ("CTEA"). The CTEA blocked his plans to post works copyrighted in 1923, works which under the previous statute would have entered the public domain in 1999. Looking to trademark law, the field has become obsessed of late with providing …


Disease And Cure?, L. A. Powe Jr. May 2003

Disease And Cure?, L. A. Powe Jr.

Michigan Law Review

Sunstein uses Franklin's remark to make two related points. First, citizens bear the burden of maintaining the American republic as a healthy, vibrant place; being a citizen is decidedly different from being a consumer. The former has duties, the latter wants (pp. 113-23). Second, and this is the gist of the slender book, the republic is jeopardized by the possibilities of the Internet. Sunstein assumes the correctness of MIT technology specialist Nicholas Negroponte's conclusion that in the not-too-distant future we will be able to create a "Daily Me" on the Internet that will provide the personalized information (including news) that …