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Family Law

Series

Child care

Law Faculty Publications

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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Childcare, Vulnerability, And Resilience, Meredith Johnson Harbach Jan 2019

Childcare, Vulnerability, And Resilience, Meredith Johnson Harbach

Law Faculty Publications

The question of how to provide care for America’s youngest children, and the quality of that care, is among the most vexed for family law. Despite seismic demographic shifts in work and family, childcare law and policy in the United States still operates on the assumption that childcare is the private responsibility of parents and families rather than a state concern. But this private childcare model, based on unrealistic assumptions in liberal theory and buttressed by an ascendant neoliberalism, is inadequate to today’s childcare challenges. This project confronts the inadequacies of the private childcare model. Using Martha Albertson Fineman’s Vulnerability …


Outsourcing Childcare, Meredith Johnson Harbach Jan 2012

Outsourcing Childcare, Meredith Johnson Harbach

Law Faculty Publications

Existing discourse on childcare decisions proceeds as if there were one "right" answer to the question of who should care for children. The law has preferences, too. But the reality is that parents, like businesses, make diverse, strategic decisions about when to keep work in-house, and when to collaborate with outside partners. This Article uses the lens of business outsourcing to gain fresh perspective on childcare decisionmaking, and the law's relationship to it. The outsourcing framework provides three key insights. First, it enables us to better understand the diversity of childcare decisions and the reasons underlying them. Second, the outsourcing …


Opening Remarks To “No Place To Live: The Housing Crisis Facing Youth Aging-Out Of Foster Care,” A National Symposium Hosted By The Child Advocacy Clinic Of St. John’S School Of Law, March 28, 2008, Dale Margolin Cecka Jan 2008

Opening Remarks To “No Place To Live: The Housing Crisis Facing Youth Aging-Out Of Foster Care,” A National Symposium Hosted By The Child Advocacy Clinic Of St. John’S School Of Law, March 28, 2008, Dale Margolin Cecka

Law Faculty Publications

Across the country, everyone is talking about a “housing crisis.” For youth who age out of foster care, just finding a place to sleep each night is a struggle. We know that nationally, 54% of recently aged-out youth are homeless or unstably housed. In addition, these youth face higher rates of unemployment, under-education, teen pregnancy, and incarceration. We are gathered here today to address the unique and dire housing needs of youth aging of foster care. I would usually begin a Symposium like this with a story of a young person’s plight, an illustration of the injustices this population faces. …