Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Evidence

2000

Institution
Keyword
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 61 - 69 of 69

Full-Text Articles in Law

Congress' Arrogance, Yale Kamisar Jan 2000

Congress' Arrogance, Yale Kamisar

Articles

Does Dickerson v. U.S., reaffirming Miranda and striking down §3501 (the federal statute purporting to "overrule" Miranda), demonstrate judicial arrogance? Or does the legislative history of §3501 demonstrate the arrogance of Congress? Shortly after Dickerson v. U.S. reaffirmed Miranda and invalidated §3501, a number of Supreme Court watchers criticized the Court for its "judicial arrogance" in peremptorily rejecting Congress' test for the admissibility of confessions. The test, pointed out the critics, had been adopted by extensive hearings and debate about Miranda's adverse impact on law enforcement. The Dickerson Court did not discuss the legislative history of §3501 at all. However, …


The Suggestibility Of Children: Scientific Research And Legal Implications, Stephen J. Ceci, Richard D. Friedman Jan 2000

The Suggestibility Of Children: Scientific Research And Legal Implications, Stephen J. Ceci, Richard D. Friedman

Articles

In this Article, Professors Ceci and Friedman analyze psychological studies on children's suggestibility and find a broad consensus that young children are suggestible to a significant degree. Studies confirm that interviewers commonly use suggestive interviewing techniques that exacerbate this suggestibility, creating a significant risk in some forensic contexts-notably but not exclusively those of suspected child abuse-that children will make false assertions of fact. Professors Ceci and Friedman address the implications of this difficulty for the legal system and respond to Professor Lyon's criticism of this view recently articulated in the Cornell Law Review. Using Bayesian probability theory, Professors Ceci and …


Dna As Evidence: Viewing Science Through The Prism Of The Law, Peter Donnelly, Richard D. Friedman Jan 2000

Dna As Evidence: Viewing Science Through The Prism Of The Law, Peter Donnelly, Richard D. Friedman

Articles

In this article, we analyze a problem related to DNA evidence that is likely to be of great and increasing significance in the near future. This is the problem of whether, and how, to present evidence that the suspect has been identified through a DNA database search. In our view, the two well-known reports on DNA evidence issued by the National Research Council (NRC) have been badly mistaken in their analysis of this problem. The mistakes are significant because the reports have carried great authority with American courts; moreover, the DNA Advisory Board of the FBI has endorsed the second …


Doubts About Daubert: Psychiatric Anecdata As A Case Study, Christopher Slobogin Jan 2000

Doubts About Daubert: Psychiatric Anecdata As A Case Study, Christopher Slobogin

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

In Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc., the Supreme Court sensibly held that testimony purporting to be scientific is admissible only if it possesses sufficient indicia of scientific validity. In Kumho Tire Co. v. Carmichael, the Court more questionably held that opinion evidence based on "technical" and "specialized" knowledge must meet the same admissibility threshold as scientific testimony. This Article addresses the implications of these two decisions for opinion evidence presented by mental health professionals in criminal trials.


Roman And Canonical Roots Of Hearsay Doctrine, Frank Herrmann Dec 1999

Roman And Canonical Roots Of Hearsay Doctrine, Frank Herrmann

Frank R. Herrmann, S.J.

No abstract provided.


A Continental Rule Against Hearsay, Frank Herrmann Dec 1999

A Continental Rule Against Hearsay, Frank Herrmann

Frank R. Herrmann, S.J.

No abstract provided.


The Harvest, Louise Harmon Dec 1999

The Harvest, Louise Harmon

Louise Harmon

No abstract provided.


5. Child Witnesses And The Oath: Empirical Evidence., Thomas D. Lyon Dec 1999

5. Child Witnesses And The Oath: Empirical Evidence., Thomas D. Lyon

Thomas D. Lyon

In Commonwealth v. Corbett, the defendant was charged with sexually assaulting a five-year-old child. As in most cases of sexual abuse, the child was the only witness to the abuse, and the prosecution viewed her testimony as essential. However, before the prosecutor could present the child's testimony to the jury, it was necessary to qualify her for the oath. Most courts require that child witnesses have some understanding of the difference between the truth and lies and the importance of telling the truth, and Massachusetts is no exception. A child who fails the qualifying questions is considered testimonially incompetent, and …


Malexandertalet: Ett Tal - Två Situationer, Matilda Arvidsson Dec 1999

Malexandertalet: Ett Tal - Två Situationer, Matilda Arvidsson

Dr Matilda Arvidsson

In this article the court speech delivered by the "Malexander widow", Anneli Ljungberg, is analysed in terms of Lloyd Bitzers "rhetorical situation" and found to work within two different and simultaneous rhetorical situations. Thus, the article shows how a court speech might break with rhetorical conventions of one rhetorical situation because of the conventions governing the other and simultaneously ongoing rhetorical situation.