Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

Apology And Organizations: Exploring An Example From Medical Practice, Jonathan R. Cohen May 2012

Apology And Organizations: Exploring An Example From Medical Practice, Jonathan R. Cohen

Jonathan R. Cohen

In this Article, I focus on injuries committed by members of organizations, such as corporations, and examine distinct issues raised by apology in the organizational setting. In particular, I consider: (i) the process of learning to prevent future errors; (ii) the divergent interests stemming from principal-agent tensions in employment, risk preferences and sources of insurance; (iii) the non-pecuniary benefits to corporate morale, productivity and reputation; (iv) the standing and scope of apologies; and (v) the articulation of policies toward injuries to others.


Collaborative Family Law, Pauline H. Tesler Mar 2012

Collaborative Family Law, Pauline H. Tesler

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

Collaborative Law appears to meet significant needs both among family law clients and among the lawyers who assist them through divorce. As will be discussed more fully below, clients appear to want the advantages of a contained, settlement-oriented, creative, private, respectful process without sacrificing the benefits of having a committed legal advocate at their sides. For that reason Collaborative Law appeals to clients who may hesitate to commit to a dispute resolution process facilitated solely by a neutral mediator. And, while many family lawyers suffer considerable professional angst as a consequence of their awareness that family law courts are neither …


The Mediated Settlement: Is It Always Just About The Money? Rarely!, Steven L. Schwartz Mar 2012

The Mediated Settlement: Is It Always Just About The Money? Rarely!, Steven L. Schwartz

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

Since our legal system of dispute resolution tends to remedy wrongs only by payment of money, most settlements will eventually involve negotiations over the amount to be paid and received. Yet, in both the theory and actual practice of mediation that has lead this writer to conclude that it is never just about the money. Effective lawyer representation of clients in mediation requires a different kind of investigation and preparation than lawyers may be accustomed to conducting. Similarly, an effective mediator must be adept in identifying the clues that reveal the "below the water line" interests at work and which …


Mediating Multi-Party Disputes: Reflections On Leadership In Mediation, Elizabeth "Wendy" Trachte-Huber Mar 2012

Mediating Multi-Party Disputes: Reflections On Leadership In Mediation, Elizabeth "Wendy" Trachte-Huber

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

Leadership in mediating multi-party matters is imperative. In my work as Claims Administrator for one of the largest ever personal injury/bankruptcy settlements ($2.3 billion, net present value), I am charged with four primary areas of responsibility: (1) the efficient and fair evaluation of claims consistent with provisions of the Joint Plan of Reorganization; (2) the efficient delivery of payments to all approved claimants pursuant to the provisions of the Joint Plan; (3) the management and custody of the assets paid to the Settlement Facility; and finally (4) the faithful execution of the provisions of the Joint Plan in all respects. …


Alternative Dispute Resolution And Court-Appointed Experts , Joseph R. Slights Iii, Mark G. Haug Mar 2012

Alternative Dispute Resolution And Court-Appointed Experts , Joseph R. Slights Iii, Mark G. Haug

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

This article shamelessly borrows its subtitles-the Court's Tale and the Expert's Tale-from Chaucer's tale-telling. The two tales examine the life cycle of a case utilizing a court-appointed expert. The Court's Tale begins with a presumption against the court-appointed expert. Certain characteristics of a dispute, however, may be sufficient to rebut this presumption. The Court's Tale tells of one such case. The case involved complex damage calculations and irreconcilable positions that invite an objective analysis. The article then turns toward the Expert's Tale which describes how an expert helped resolve the problem. Following the Expert's Tale, the court assesses the outcome …


Immunizing Arbitrators From Claims For Equitable Relief, Michael D. Moberly Mar 2012

Immunizing Arbitrators From Claims For Equitable Relief, Michael D. Moberly

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

The article begins with a summary of the historical origins of the judicial and arbitral immunity doctrines. Next, the article discusses the courts' refusal to extend judicial immunity to claims for declaratory, injunctive, or other equitable relief, except perhaps in the case of federal judges. The article then explores the propriety of recognizing a similar limitation in cases construing the arbitral immunity doctrine. The article ultimately concludes that (1) arbitrators should be immune from claims for equitable relief as a matter of policy, and (2) in jurisdictions where that result is currently precluded by existing precedent, a comparable result can …


The Relational Contingency Of Rights, Gideon Parchomovsky, Alex Stein Feb 2012

The Relational Contingency Of Rights, Gideon Parchomovsky, Alex Stein

All Faculty Scholarship

In this Article, we demonstrate, contrary to conventional wisdom, that all rights are relationally contingent. Our main thesis is that rights afford their holders meaningful protection only against challengers who face higher litigation costs than the rightholder. Contrariwise, challengers who can litigate more cheaply than a rightholder can force the rightholder to forfeit the right and thereby render the right ineffective. Consequently, in the real world, rights avail only against certain challengers but not others. This result is robust and pervasive. Furthermore, it obtains irrespectively of how rights and other legal entitlements are defined by the legislator or construed by …


The Machinery Of Criminal Justice, Stephanos Bibas Jan 2012

The Machinery Of Criminal Justice, Stephanos Bibas

All Faculty Scholarship

Two centuries ago, the American criminal justice was run primarily by laymen. Jury trials passed moral judgment on crimes, vindicated victims and innocent defendants, and denounced the guilty. But over the last two centuries, lawyers have taken over the process, silencing victims and defendants and, in many cases, substituting a plea-bargaining system for the voice of the jury. The public sees little of how this assembly-line justice works, and victims and defendants have largely lost their day in court. As a result, victims rarely hear defendants express remorse and apologize, and defendants rarely receive forgiveness. This lawyerized machinery has purchased …


Show Me The Money: Part One, Elayne E. Greenberg Jan 2012

Show Me The Money: Part One, Elayne E. Greenberg

Faculty Publications

(Excerpt)

Until now, the discussion of how to ethically monetize “the value added” that settlement savvy attorneys bring to the client has been one of the few remaining taboos that is rarely, candidly discussed among lawyers. How should settlement-proficient lawyers calculate the value of efficient, quality outcomes? How does a lawyer who bills by the hour ethically deal with the inherent conflict of interest between his desire to make as much money as he can and the economic disincentive to be settlement proficient? What are some creative billing incentives to more closely align the clients’ desire for contained legal costs …