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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Law

Dr Ethics Book Brings It All Together, Jonathan R. Cohen Jul 2002

Dr Ethics Book Brings It All Together, Jonathan R. Cohen

UF Law Faculty Publications

Dispute resolution practice has changed dramatically over the past several decades. The traditional litigation model has increasingly given way to a “multi-door” vision of varied dispute resolution practices. With that functional change in how we process disputes has come a pressing need to address the varied ethical challenges of these varied practices. Dispute Resolution Ethics is a marvelous contribution toward that effort.


The Contemplative Lawyer: On The Potential Contributions Of Mindfulness Meditation To Law Students, Lawyers, And Their Clients, Leonard L. Riskin Apr 2002

The Contemplative Lawyer: On The Potential Contributions Of Mindfulness Meditation To Law Students, Lawyers, And Their Clients, Leonard L. Riskin

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article proposes that introducing mindfulness meditation into the legal profession may improve practitioners' well-being and performance and weaken the dominance of adversarial mind-sets. By enabling some lawyers to make more room for - and act from - broader and deeper perspectives, mindfulness can help lawyers provide more appropriate service (especially through better listening and negotiation) and gain more personal satisfaction from their work.

Part I of this article describes a number of problems associated with law school and law practice. Part II sets forth a variety of ways in which lawyers, law schools, and professional organizations have tried to address these ...


Legislating Apology: The Pros And Cons, Jonathan R. Cohen Apr 2002

Legislating Apology: The Pros And Cons, Jonathan R. Cohen

UF Law Faculty Publications

Should apologies be admissible into evidence as proof of fault in civil cases? While this question is a simple one, its potential ramifications are great, and legislative and scholarly interest in the admissibility of apologies has exploded. Shortly after the idea of excluding apologies from admissibility into evidence was raised in academic circles three years ago, it rapidly spread to the policy arena. For example, California and Florida enacted laws in 2000 and 2001 respectively excluding from admissibility apologetic expressions of sympathy ("I'm sorry that you are hurt") but not fault-admitting apologies ("I'm sorrythat I injured you") after ...


Using Dispute System Design Methods To Promote Good-Faith Participation In Court-Connected Mediation Programs, John Lande Jan 2002

Using Dispute System Design Methods To Promote Good-Faith Participation In Court-Connected Mediation Programs, John Lande

John Lande

This Article discusses what can be done to promote productive behavior in mediation and reduce bad conduct. Although most participants do not abuse the mediation process, some people use mediation to drag out litigation, gain leverage for later negotiations, and generally wear down the opposition. Rules requiring good-faith participation are likely to be ineffective and possibly counterproductive. This Article proposes using dispute system design principles to develop policies satisfying the interests of stakeholders in court-connected mediation programs. After outlining interests of key stakeholder groups including litigants, attorneys, courts, and mediators, the Article describes specific policies that could satisfy their interests ...


Ending A Mud Bowl: Defining Arbitration’S Finality Through Functional Analysis, Amy J. Schmitz Jan 2002

Ending A Mud Bowl: Defining Arbitration’S Finality Through Functional Analysis, Amy J. Schmitz

Faculty Publications

The Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) and Uniform Arbitration Act (UAA), on the state level, prescribe a nearly identical procedural and remedial scheme for promoting independent, self-contained arbitration. To that end, both acts curtail courts' review of arbitration awards, by limiting the grounds for vacating awards to those aimed at ensuring only basic procedural fairness. Nonetheless, seemingly "pro-arbitration" impulses have driven some courts' eager application, or misapplication, of the FAA/UAA statutory scheme to enforce dispute resolution agreements that reject the acts' limited review prescriptions. This Article tackles this arguable abuse of the FAA/UAA scheme, by proposing a functional analysis ...


Zoning, Taking, And Dealing: The Problems And Promise Of Bargaining In Land Use Planning, Erin Ryan Jan 2002

Zoning, Taking, And Dealing: The Problems And Promise Of Bargaining In Land Use Planning, Erin Ryan

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Finding Out If It Is True: Comparing Mediation And Negotiation Through Research, Craig A. Mcewen, Roselle L. Wissler Jan 2002

Finding Out If It Is True: Comparing Mediation And Negotiation Through Research, Craig A. Mcewen, Roselle L. Wissler

Journal of Dispute Resolution

In this article, we first use existing research evidence to contextualize more clearly the place of civil case mediation in the litigation process. When we understand civil mediation as part of adversarial litigation - rather than as distinct from it - we see the importance of comparing mediation and unassisted negotiation. Next, we discuss research and commentary on the barriers to negotiation and the ways in which mediation might help overcome them. This work provides a more pragmatic and empirically grounded perspective on the potential value of mediation than does "mediation ideology" and suggests a wide range of "hypotheses" to guide future ...


Lawyer-Negotiator As Mood Scientist: What We Know And Don't Know About How Mood Relates To Successful Negotiation, The, Clark Freshman, Adele Hayes, Greg Feldman Jan 2002

Lawyer-Negotiator As Mood Scientist: What We Know And Don't Know About How Mood Relates To Successful Negotiation, The, Clark Freshman, Adele Hayes, Greg Feldman

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This article explores two related questions: First, does mood7 shape how well lawyers succeed at negotiation?" Second, can lawyers succeed better at negotiation by understanding and managing the role of mood? We begin by exploring what scientific evidence we currently have about how mild changes in mood are associated with significant differences in success at negotiation. Ultimately, we argue that existing scientific evidence shows mood plays a far more complicated role than negotiators and negotiation scholars usually imagine, but that further research needs to address more carefully exactly how mood works and how it affects lawyers and legal negotiation. We ...


Confidential From General Counsel To Ceo:"I'M Fed Up, And We're Not Going To Take This Anymore!", Karl A. Slaikeu, Diane W. Slaikeu Jan 2002

Confidential From General Counsel To Ceo:"I'M Fed Up, And We're Not Going To Take This Anymore!", Karl A. Slaikeu, Diane W. Slaikeu

Journal of Health Care Law and Policy

No abstract provided.


Can Saints Negotiate? A Brief Introduction To The Problems Of Perfect Ethics In Bargaining, Scott R. Peppet Jan 2002

Can Saints Negotiate? A Brief Introduction To The Problems Of Perfect Ethics In Bargaining, Scott R. Peppet

Articles

No abstract provided.


A Culture Of Conflict: Lessons From Renegotiating Health Care, Leonard J. Marcus Jan 2002

A Culture Of Conflict: Lessons From Renegotiating Health Care, Leonard J. Marcus

Journal of Health Care Law and Policy

No abstract provided.


Negotiations Goes To War, Charles J. Dunlap Jr., Paula B. Mccarron Jan 2002

Negotiations Goes To War, Charles J. Dunlap Jr., Paula B. Mccarron

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Zoning, Taking, & Dealing: The Problems And Promise Of Bargaining In Land Use Planning, Erin Ryan Dec 2001

Zoning, Taking, & Dealing: The Problems And Promise Of Bargaining In Land Use Planning, Erin Ryan

Erin Ryan

Municipal land use bargaining may imply as many problems as it heralds promise, but it is widely acknowleged as the universal language of land use planning. Planners and scholars agree that public-private negotiation plays a central role in the vast majority of local land use decision-making. At least in part, this is a result of the peculiar attributes of the resource at issue. Land is, perhaps, the ultimate nonfungible. Each parcel of land possesses unique characteristics not only in its physical attributes, but also by virtue of its location, and its proximity to other unique parcels. Moreover, land uses implicate ...