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Full-Text Articles in Law

Autism And Access To Healthcare, Amanda Forbes Jan 2024

Autism And Access To Healthcare, Amanda Forbes

Mitchell Hamline Law Journal of Public Policy and Practice

No abstract provided.


The Thinning Blue Line: Ptsd Benefits For Law Enforcement In Minnesota, Caleb Wootan Jan 2024

The Thinning Blue Line: Ptsd Benefits For Law Enforcement In Minnesota, Caleb Wootan

Mitchell Hamline Law Journal of Public Policy and Practice

No abstract provided.


Foreword: The Disability Frame, Jasmine E. Harris, Karen Tani Jan 2022

Foreword: The Disability Frame, Jasmine E. Harris, Karen Tani

All Faculty Scholarship

This essay is the Foreword to the 2022 University of Pennsylvania Law Review symposium on “The Disability Frame.” “The disability frame” refers to the characterization of a particular controversy or problem as being “about” disability, which in turn can imply that disability-focused laws ought to resolve or adjudicate the issue. We see this frame function in at least four ways. First, the disability frame is sometimes invoked as a shield, with the hope that it will insulate someone from the reach of the state or exempt a person from an unwelcome or onerous responsibility (e.g., jury service, vaccination, a criminal …


Maternity Rights: A Comparative View Of Mexico And The United States, Roberto Rosas Oct 2021

Maternity Rights: A Comparative View Of Mexico And The United States, Roberto Rosas

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Women play a large role in the workplace and require additional protection during pregnancy, childbirth, and while raising children. This article compares how Mexico and the United States have approached the issue of maternity rights and benefits. First, Mexico provides eighty-four days of paid leave to mothers, while the United States provides unpaid leave for up to twelve weeks. Second, Mexico allows two thirty-minute breaks a day for breastfeeding, while the United States allows a reasonable amount of time per day to breastfeed. Third, Mexico provides childcare to most federal employees, while the United States provides daycares to a small …


Telehealth And Telework Accessibility In A Pandemic-Induced Virtual World, Blake Reid, Christian Vogler, Zainab Alkebsi Nov 2020

Telehealth And Telework Accessibility In A Pandemic-Induced Virtual World, Blake Reid, Christian Vogler, Zainab Alkebsi

University of Colorado Law Review Forum

This short essay explores one dimension of disability law’s COVID-related “frailty”: how the pandemic has undermined equal access to employment and healthcare for Americans who are deaf or hard of hearing as healthcare and employment migrate toward telehealth and telework activities. This essay’s authors—a clinical law professor; a computer scientist whose research focuses on accessible technology; and a deaf policy attorney for the nation’s premier civil rights organization of, by, and for deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the United States—have collaborated over the past months on detailed advocacy documents aimed at helping deaf and hard of hearing patients …


How Medicalization Of Civil Rights Could Disappoint, Allison K. Hoffman Jul 2020

How Medicalization Of Civil Rights Could Disappoint, Allison K. Hoffman

All Faculty Scholarship

This essay reflects on Craig Konnoth’s recent Article, Medicalization and the New Civil Rights, which is a carefully crafted and thought-provoking description of the refashioning of civil rights claims into medical rights frameworks. He compellingly threads together many intellectual traditions—from antidiscrimination law to disability law to health law—to illustrate the pervasiveness of the phenomenon that he describes and why it might be productive as a tool to advance civil rights.

This response, however, offers several reasons why medicalization may not cure all that ails civil rights litigation’s pains and elaborates on the potential risks of overinvesting in medical rights-seeking. …


Student Note: Finding The Positive In A Positive Drug Test: How Narrowing The Definition Of An Individualized Pre-Employment Assessment Under The Ada Can Encourage Recovery From Opioid Dependence, Sarah Ferraro Apr 2020

Student Note: Finding The Positive In A Positive Drug Test: How Narrowing The Definition Of An Individualized Pre-Employment Assessment Under The Ada Can Encourage Recovery From Opioid Dependence, Sarah Ferraro

Belmont Health Law Journal

This note will address the disparities in the way courts have analyzed the direct threat exception to ADA protection, and why a uniform application of the exception is crucial to both employers and those in recovery. Part I examines how opioids have devolved from an effective pain management tool to a national enemy. This section will answer common questions about why opioids are so addictive and why doctors prescribe them in the first place. It also addresses the scope of the ADA and the direct threat exception used to justify a decision not to hire a prescription drug user, as …


Knowledge Of Practicing Physicians About Their Legal Obligations When Caring For Patients With Disability, Nicole Agaronnik, Elizabeth Pendo, Julie Ressalam, Eric G. Campbell, Lisa Iezzoni Jan 2019

Knowledge Of Practicing Physicians About Their Legal Obligations When Caring For Patients With Disability, Nicole Agaronnik, Elizabeth Pendo, Julie Ressalam, Eric G. Campbell, Lisa Iezzoni

All Faculty Scholarship

doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2018.05060 HEALTH AFFAIRS 38, NO. 4 (2019): 545–553


Gambling Disorder, Vulnerability, And The Law: Mapping The Field, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2016

Gambling Disorder, Vulnerability, And The Law: Mapping The Field, Stacey A. Tovino

Scholarly Works

This Article seeks to descriptively map the sub-field of gambling disorder and the law and ask whether individuals with gambling disorder are vulnerable under the law. Like other scholarship that descriptively maps ethical, legal, and social implications of lesser known conditions and developments, this Article seeks to describe the treatment of individuals with gambling disorder in a variety of illustrative, but not exhaustive, legal contexts, to identify the limited scholarship assessing the application of the law to individuals with gambling disorder, and to invite members of the health law academy to bring their significant expertise to bear on these issues …


Invalid Testimony: Disability And Voice In The Criminal Procedure (Co-Authored With Osnat Ein-Dor) (Hebrew), Sagit Mor Jan 2014

Invalid Testimony: Disability And Voice In The Criminal Procedure (Co-Authored With Osnat Ein-Dor) (Hebrew), Sagit Mor

Sagit Mor

This Article discuses the sociolegal reality that people with developmental and mental disabilities experience in their interaction with the criminal justice system and the challenges that the criminal system faces when it comes to deal with a case which involves a disabled person. It maintains that the barriers that disabled people face in criminal proceedings do not exist only in pre-trial stages, but also during the trial itself, since courts, too, are impacted by exclusionary legal rules and by cognitive schemas that express negative stereotypes. In 2005 a new law was introduced in Israel: Investigation and Testimony Proceedings (Accommodations for …


Equal Rights For Disabled People In Employment Law – A Critical Assessment (Hebrew), Sagit Mor Jan 2012

Equal Rights For Disabled People In Employment Law – A Critical Assessment (Hebrew), Sagit Mor

Sagit Mor

This article presents a pioneering research project, which seeks to explore whether and to what extent the Equal Rights for People with Disability Law, 1998, had an impact on courts' rulings on matters related to disability employment discrimination. In particular, it seeks to examine (1) whether a consistent and instructive legal doctrine has evolved, one that reflects the principles that guided the framers of the legislation, and (2) whether the legal discourse on disability has changed. The article presents the emerging theory of disability legal studies and its unique and original contribution to legal scholarship. Disability legal studies seeks to …


How Not To End Disability, Janet Radcliffe Richards Jan 2002

How Not To End Disability, Janet Radcliffe Richards

San Diego Law Review

When advances in genetic technology offer the chance of preventing or curing disease and disability, it is one thing to recommend caution on the grounds that these obvious benefits may be outweighed by associated harms. It is quite another to deny even that there are benefits to be outweighed, and that attempts to prevent disability by these means should be resisted outright. That, however, is a view that is increasingly widespread in the disability rights movement.