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Full-Text Articles in Law

How Many Terrorists Are There? The Escalation In So-Called Terrorism Prosecutions, Nora V. Demleitner Oct 2003

How Many Terrorists Are There? The Escalation In So-Called Terrorism Prosecutions, Nora V. Demleitner

Scholarly Articles

Not available.


Canadian Fundamental Justice And American Due Process: Two Models For A Guarantee Of Basic Adjudicative Fairness, David M. Siegel Sep 2003

Canadian Fundamental Justice And American Due Process: Two Models For A Guarantee Of Basic Adjudicative Fairness, David M. Siegel

ExpressO

This paper traces how the Supreme Courts of Canada and the United States have each used the basic guarantee of adjudicative fairness in their respective constitutions to effect revolutions in their countries’ criminal justice systems, through two different jurisprudential models for this development. It identifies a relationship between two core constitutional structures, the basic guarantee and enumerated rights, and shows how this relationship can affect the degree to which entrenched constitutional rights actually protect individuals. It explains that the different models for the relationship between the basic guarantee and enumerated rights adopted in Canada and the United States, an “expansive ...


Trends. Social Cognition And The Legal Adjudication Of Terrorism Cases, Ibpp Editor Apr 2003

Trends. Social Cognition And The Legal Adjudication Of Terrorism Cases, Ibpp Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This Trends article discusses the impact of terrorism on the justice system and security.


Assassination, The War On Terrorism, And The Constitution, Rodney A. Smolla Mar 2003

Assassination, The War On Terrorism, And The Constitution, Rodney A. Smolla

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Enemy Combatants, The Courts, And The Constitution, Roberto Iraola Jan 2003

Enemy Combatants, The Courts, And The Constitution, Roberto Iraola

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Decoupling 'Terrorist' From 'Immigrant': An Enhanced Role For The Federal Courts Post 9/11, Victor C. Romero Jan 2003

Decoupling 'Terrorist' From 'Immigrant': An Enhanced Role For The Federal Courts Post 9/11, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Attorney General John Ashcroft has utilized the broad immigration power ceded to him by Congress to ferret out terrorists among noncitizens detained for minor immigration violations. Such a strategy provides the government two options: deport those who are not terrorists, and then prosecute others who are. While certainly efficient, using immigration courts and their less formal due process protections afforded noncitizens should trigger greater oversight and vigilance by the federal courts for at least four reasons: First, while the legitimate goal of immigration law enforcement is deportation, Ashcroft's true objective in ...