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Criminal Procedure

Batson v. Kentucky

Cornell University Law School

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Race And Recalcitrance: The Miller-El Remands, Sheri Johnson Oct 2007

Race And Recalcitrance: The Miller-El Remands, Sheri Johnson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In Batson v. Kentucky, the Supreme Court held that a prosecutor may not peremptorily challenge a juror based upon his or her race. Although Baston was decided more than twenty years ago, some lower courts still resist its command. Three recent cases provide particularly egregious examples of that resistance. The Fifth Circuit refused the Supreme Court's instruction in Miller-El v. Cockrell, necessitating a second grant of certiorari in Miller-El v. Dretke. The court then reversed and remanded four lower court cases for reconsideration in light of Miller-El, but in two cases the lower courts have thus …


Knockin' On Heaven's Door: Rethinking The Role Of Religion In Death Penalty Cases, Gary J. Simson, Stephen P. Garvey Jul 2001

Knockin' On Heaven's Door: Rethinking The Role Of Religion In Death Penalty Cases, Gary J. Simson, Stephen P. Garvey

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Religion has played a prominent role at various points of capital trials. In jury selection, peremptory challenges have been exercised against prospective jurors on the basis of their religion. At the sentencing phase, defendants have offered as mitigating evidence proof of their religiosity, and the prosecution has introduced evidence of the victim's religiosity. In closing argument, quotations from the Bible and other appeals to religion have long been common. During deliberations, jurors have engaged in group prayer and tried to sway one another with quotes from scripture.

Such practices have not gone unquestioned. Rather remarkably, however, the questions have almost …


Unconscious Racism And The Criminal Law, Sheri Johnson Jul 1998

Unconscious Racism And The Criminal Law, Sheri Johnson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Batson Ethics For Prosecutors And Trial Court Judges, Sheri Lynn Johnson Jan 1998

Batson Ethics For Prosecutors And Trial Court Judges, Sheri Lynn Johnson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Langugage And Culture (Not To Say Race) Of Peremptory Challenges, Sheri Lynn Johnson Oct 1993

The Langugage And Culture (Not To Say Race) Of Peremptory Challenges, Sheri Lynn Johnson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Racial Discrimination In The State's Use Of Peremptory Challenges: The Application Of The United States Supreme Court's Decision In Batson V. Kentucky In South Carolina, John H. Blume Jan 1989

Racial Discrimination In The State's Use Of Peremptory Challenges: The Application Of The United States Supreme Court's Decision In Batson V. Kentucky In South Carolina, John H. Blume

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Some one hundred and six years before the United States Supreme Court's 1986 decision in Batson v. Kentucky the Court ruled that a black person is denied the equal protection of the laws when the State seeks to convict him of a criminal offense in a proceeding in which members of his race have been excluded from serving on the jury. From this straightforward and common-sense beginning, the Court stumbled and lurched for more than a century before arriving at another equally straightforward and common-sense decision in Batson. The purpose of this article is to examine the Supreme Court's …