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Criminal Law

Due process

Cleveland State University

Journal

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Due Process Junior: Competent (Enough) For The Court, Tigan Woolson Dec 2022

Due Process Junior: Competent (Enough) For The Court, Tigan Woolson

Journal of Law and Health

There are many reports presenting expert policy recommendations, and a substantial volume of research supporting them, that detail what should shape and guide statutes for juvenile competency to stand trial. Ohio has adopted provisions consistent with some of these recommendations, which is better protection than relying on case law and the adult statutes, as some states have done. However, the Ohio statute should be considered a work in progress.

Since appeals courts are unlikely to provide meaningful review for the substance of a juvenile competency determination, the need for procedures for ensuring that the determination is initially made in a …


The Marriage Of State Law And Individual Rights And A New Limit On The Federal Death Penalty, Jonathan Ross Jan 2014

The Marriage Of State Law And Individual Rights And A New Limit On The Federal Death Penalty, Jonathan Ross

Cleveland State Law Review

Since the 1990s, federal prosecutors have, with increasing frequency, sought the death penalty for federal offenses committed in and also punishable under the laws of non-death penalty states. Critics of this practice have pointed out that federal prosecutors can use the federal death penalty to circumvent a state's abolition of capital punishment. Courts, however, have almost unanimously rejected arguments that state law should be a shield from federal punishment for federal offenses. This article proposes a novel way to challenge the federal death penalty's use in a non-death penalty state—the Supreme Court's reasoning in United States v. Windsor. In Windsor, …


The Right To Counsel And Due Process In Probation Revocation Proceedings: Gagnon V. Scarpelli, Douglas C. Jenkins Jan 1974

The Right To Counsel And Due Process In Probation Revocation Proceedings: Gagnon V. Scarpelli, Douglas C. Jenkins

Cleveland State Law Review

On May 14, 1973, the worst fear of at least one commentator was borne out by the opinion of the Supreme Court in Gagnon v. Scarpelli. Justice Powell, writing for the Court, recognized certain due process rights of the individual who has been convicted and placed on probation. The Court refused to adopt a per se right to representation by counsel as an element of due process in probation revocation proceedings, however. The opinion has left the meaning and importance of due process in grave doubt, has retarded the progression of penal-correctional reform, and has insured a heavy docket for …


Prisoner's Clothing During Trial, Christine Mukai Jan 1971

Prisoner's Clothing During Trial, Christine Mukai

Cleveland State Law Review

This paper will deal with the appearance, vis-a-vis clothing, of a criminal defendant and the right of that defendant not to be attired in prison garb during judicial proceedings. The purpose here is not to consider the practices of the various jurisdictions; rather this shall be an attempt to display the existence and implications of the right to stand trial in non-criminating clothing.


Right To Counsel In Criminal Cases, Edward T. Haggins Jan 1966

Right To Counsel In Criminal Cases, Edward T. Haggins

Cleveland State Law Review

"The right to be heard would be, in many cases, of little avail if it did not comprehend the right to be heard by counsel. Even the intelligent and educated layman has small and sometimes no skill in the science of law... He requires the guiding hand of counsel at every step of the proceedings against him." These words, written in 1932 by Mr. Justice Sutherland for the majority in the famous case of Powell v. Alabama underline the fundamental right of a defendant in American criminal proceeding to have the assistance of counsel.