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Full-Text Articles in Law

Thug Life: Hip Hop’S Curious Relationship With Criminal Justice, André Douglas Pond Cummings Jul 2009

Thug Life: Hip Hop’S Curious Relationship With Criminal Justice, André Douglas Pond Cummings

Faculty Scholarship

I argue that hip hop music and culture profoundly influences attitudes toward and perceptions about criminal justice in the United States. At base, hip hop lyrics and their cultural accoutrements turns U.S. punishment philosophy upon its head, effectively defeating the foundational purposes of American crime and punishment. Prison and punishment philosophy in the U.S. is based on clear principles of retribution and incapacitation, where prison time for crime should serve to deter individuals from engaging in criminal behavior. In addition, the stigma that attaches to imprisonment should dissuade criminals from recidivism. Hip hop culture denounces crime and punishment in the …


Criminal Law—No Right To Revoke And Avoid Search-Ninth Circuit Rules That Consent To Airport Screening Cannot Be Revoked In An Administrative Search. United States V. Aukai, 497 F.3d 955 (9th Cir. 2007)., Bethany A. Gulley Apr 2009

Criminal Law—No Right To Revoke And Avoid Search-Ninth Circuit Rules That Consent To Airport Screening Cannot Be Revoked In An Administrative Search. United States V. Aukai, 497 F.3d 955 (9th Cir. 2007)., Bethany A. Gulley

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Developing A State Constitutional Law Strategy In New Mexico Criminal Prosecutions, J. Thomas Sullivan Jan 2009

Developing A State Constitutional Law Strategy In New Mexico Criminal Prosecutions, J. Thomas Sullivan

Faculty Scholarship

This article includes a review of the process by which the New Mexico courts have developed an independent state constitutional jurisprudence reflecting more expansive protections of individual rights than those afforded by the Federal Constitution, as interpreted in the decisions of the United States Supreme Court. It addresses the existing body of state constitutional law and suggests possibilities for further developments, including both the substantive aspects of state constitutional topics and the procedural requirements for asserting state constitutional protections as alternative sources for protection of individual rights. It documents how far New Mexico has come in developing a state constitutional …