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The Role Of A Trial Jury In Determining The Voluntariness Of A Confession, Michigan Law Review Dec 1964

The Role Of A Trial Jury In Determining The Voluntariness Of A Confession, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

The Supreme Court of the United States has vigorously implemented the principle that criminal prosecution is an investigative, not an inquisitorial, process. Evidence of guilt must be obtained by methods free from physical or psychological coercion. Protections in the Bill of Rights against illegal search and seizure, self-incrimination, and trial without counsel have been extended to the states through the due process clause of the fourteenth amendment. Safeguards against the admissibility of coerced confessions into evidence have also been instituted. Because a confession practically determines the ultimate question of guilt, the critical standards for· admissibility are frequently challenged on appeal. …


Prejudicial In11uence On Jury Of Newspaper Published During Trial-People V. Purvis, Michigan Law Review Nov 1964

Prejudicial In11uence On Jury Of Newspaper Published During Trial-People V. Purvis, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Defendant had been paroled after serving four years of a sentence for second degree murder. While on parole, he was tried for another homicide and convicted of murder in the first degree. In separate penalty trials, juries had twice assessed the death sentence, which, on both occasions, had been set aside by the reviewing court. During the third trial, the Sunday newspaper in the local county published a front-page article attacking the leniency of the parole system, attributing the area's high crime rate partly to the recidivist tendencies of parolees, and quoting the county sheriff's opinion that defendant should be …


Crimes Against Humanity And The Principle Of Nonextradition Of Political Offenders, Manuel R. Garcia-Mora Apr 1964

Crimes Against Humanity And The Principle Of Nonextradition Of Political Offenders, Manuel R. Garcia-Mora

Michigan Law Review

It is thus the purpose of this article to discuss the nature of crimes against humanity in an effort to determine whether they can be classified as political offenses. It is hoped that from the uncertainty and confusion which appear to underlie the practice of the State, some useful legal principles may be extracted.


Criminal Law-Aiding And Abeiting-Criminal Liablity For Knowingly Furnishing Racing Results To Bookmakers, John H. Blish Apr 1964

Criminal Law-Aiding And Abeiting-Criminal Liablity For Knowingly Furnishing Racing Results To Bookmakers, John H. Blish

Michigan Law Review

Appellant, who received a weekly salary for distributing horse-racing results by telephone to some twenty bookmakers, was convicted of aiding and abetting bookmaking activities in violation of section 986 of the New York Penal Law. He admitted knowing that the information would be used by his employer's customers in violation of section 986, but no actual evidence of bookmaking was presented to the court. On appeal, held, reversed, one judge dissenting. Knowingly transmitting racing results to bookmaking establishments by telephone does not, without proof of acceptance of bets on a professional basis, constitute aiding and abetting bookmaking in violation …


Criminal Law-Reiterated Contempt Of Court, Robert C. Bonges Apr 1964

Criminal Law-Reiterated Contempt Of Court, Robert C. Bonges

Michigan Law Review

The defendant was found guilty of criminal contempt of court in a civil proceeding for giving "don't remember" answers, after having been granted immunity from prosecution, to questions concerning his activities, asked during a grand jury investigation of an attempted homicide. For his refusal to testify, the defendant was given the maximum penalty provided for criminal contempt under the applicable statute. After paying the fine and serving the sentence, the defendant was brought before the same grand jury thirty-five days later and was asked the same questions. The defendant repeated the "don't remember" answers and was again fined and incarcerated. …


Federal Criminal Procedure-Subpoena Of Nonresident Citizen As Witness Before Grand Jury, Andre A. Schwartz Apr 1964

Federal Criminal Procedure-Subpoena Of Nonresident Citizen As Witness Before Grand Jury, Andre A. Schwartz

Michigan Law Review

Defendant, a nonresident citizen of the United States, was subpoenaed by a federal district court to appear before a grand jury investigating alleged fraud in the procurement of government contracts. Defendant having failed to appear, the district court issued an order directing him to show cause why he should not be held in contempt. On appeal from a judgment holding defendant in contempt, held, reversed, one judge dissenting in part. The power of a federal district court to subpoena a nonresident citizen is limited to the actual trial of a criminal action. United States v. Thompson, 319 F.2d …


New And Comprehensive Duties Of Securities Sellers To Investigate, Disclose, And Have An "Adequate Basis" For Representations, Willoughby C. Johnson Mar 1964

New And Comprehensive Duties Of Securities Sellers To Investigate, Disclose, And Have An "Adequate Basis" For Representations, Willoughby C. Johnson

Michigan Law Review

The duties of investigation and disclosure imposed upon securities salesmen have been significantly enlarged by several recent cases generated by the Second Circuit's 1963 decision of Berko v. SEC. In a hearing before the Securities and Exchange Commission it was found that Berko was a salesman working out of an acknowledged "boiler room." His employer had provided its salesmen, including Berko, with fraudulent sales brochures, some of which were subsequently distributed by Berko. The action by the Commission against Berko arose out of the sale of a specific security to a customer who had received fraudulent sales brochures and …