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The Rule Against Hearsay, Indigenous Claims And Story-Telling As Testimony In Canadian Courts, Zia Akhtar Jun 2022

The Rule Against Hearsay, Indigenous Claims And Story-Telling As Testimony In Canadian Courts, Zia Akhtar

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Case Law On American Indians, Thomas P. Schlosser Jun 2022

Case Law On American Indians, Thomas P. Schlosser

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Extraction Of Personal Data: A New Form Of Colonialism Or Continuation Of A Colonial Practice? Adult Native American Adoptees Resist Assimilation And Rebuild Erased Identities, Leonard Mukosi Jun 2022

Extraction Of Personal Data: A New Form Of Colonialism Or Continuation Of A Colonial Practice? Adult Native American Adoptees Resist Assimilation And Rebuild Erased Identities, Leonard Mukosi

American Indian Law Journal

A new form of colonialism, distinctive of the 21st century is reported to be taking shape: data colonialism. Data colonialism interprets the contemporary capture and processing of personal data by governments or data corporations as an evolution of historical colonialism. Scholars who advance this theory do not juxtapose the contents, form, let alone the physical violence of historical colonialism with the contemporary practices of appropriation of personal data. Instead, they only refer to historic colonialism in the context of its function within the development of economies on a global scale. The main argument made in this paper is that; to …


Crossing The Dark And Fearful River: Monsanto, Pcbs, And Emerging Tort Theories, Keith Dornan, Jamie Hearn Jun 2022

Crossing The Dark And Fearful River: Monsanto, Pcbs, And Emerging Tort Theories, Keith Dornan, Jamie Hearn

American Indian Law Journal

guide the discussion.

Tribal, state, and city authorities are currently pursuing or have settled product liability, public nuisance, and other common law and statutory tort claims brought against Monsanto[1] for PCB contamination.[2] “Sovereign-led” litigation melds traditional plaintiff common law tort litigation with sovereign-led environmental suits and is an emerging trend in environmental law.[3] Tort claims against the manufacturers of contaminants ubiquitous in the environment give sovereigns a new angle for pursuing damages separate from a traditional statutory environmental claim under federal or state regulatory schemes, such as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)


The Importance Of Abolition Of The Carceral State For Native Survivors, Christina M. Schnalzer Jan 2022

The Importance Of Abolition Of The Carceral State For Native Survivors, Christina M. Schnalzer

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Analyzing The Implications Of The Supreme Court's Application Of The Canons Of Construction In Recent Federal Indian Law Cases, Meredith Harris J.D. Jan 2022

Analyzing The Implications Of The Supreme Court's Application Of The Canons Of Construction In Recent Federal Indian Law Cases, Meredith Harris J.D.

American Indian Law Journal

Federal Indian law in the United States has historically relied on application of the Indian Canons of Construction (“Canons”). The courts have relied on these principles since 1832. However, their application has not been consistent. Indeed, the Canons are discretionary which has led to judicial avoidance. Yet, recent Supreme Court opinions demonstrate a resurgence of the Canons and a trend towards a textualist approach, both of which involve greater deference to tribal understandings. Ultimately, the opinions in United States v. Washington, Washington State Dept. of Licensing v. Cougar Den, Herrera v. Wyoming, and McGirt v. Oklahoma, …


Tech And Authoritarianism: How The People’S Republic Of China Is Using Data To Control Hong Kong And Why The U.S. Is Vulnerable, Bryce Neary Jan 2022

Tech And Authoritarianism: How The People’S Republic Of China Is Using Data To Control Hong Kong And Why The U.S. Is Vulnerable, Bryce Neary

Seattle Journal of Technology, Environmental & Innovation Law

The aim of this article is to analyze and compare current events in the People's Republic of China and the United States to discuss the moral dilemmas that arise when establishing the boundary between national security interests and individual privacy rights. As we continue to intertwine our lives with technology, it has become increasingly important to establish clear privacy rights. The question then becomes: at what point should individuals sacrifice their rights for what the government considers the "greater good" of the country?

Further, this article analyzes the development of U.S. privacy law and its relationship to national security, technology, …


Foreword, Seattle University Law Review Jan 2022

Foreword, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Foreward


Keynote Address, Justin Hansford Jan 2022

Keynote Address, Justin Hansford

Seattle University Law Review

Keynote Address by Justin Hansford


Race And Washington’S Criminal Justice System 2021: Report To The Washington Supreme Court, Task Force 2.0 Research Working Group Jan 2022

Race And Washington’S Criminal Justice System 2021: Report To The Washington Supreme Court, Task Force 2.0 Research Working Group

Seattle University Law Review

This report is an update on the 2011 Preliminary Report on Race and Washington’s Criminal Justice System. This update does not include as context the history of race discrimination in Washington, and readers are encouraged to view the 2011 report for its brief historical overview.14 The 2011 report began with that historical overview because the criminal justice system does not exist in a vacuum. Instead, it exists as part of a legal system that for decades actively managed and controlled where people could live, work, recreate, and even be buried.

Members of communities impacted by race disproportionality in Washington’s criminal …


Race In Washington’S Juvenile Legal System: 2021 Report To The Washington Supreme Court, Task Force 2.0 Juvenile Justice Subcommittee Jan 2022

Race In Washington’S Juvenile Legal System: 2021 Report To The Washington Supreme Court, Task Force 2.0 Juvenile Justice Subcommittee

Seattle University Law Review

Part I of this report provides the core work of the subcommittee and is intended to function as a stand-alone document, expressed in youth- friendly language, that sets forth: (1) the youth-articulated goals for systemic change to the juvenile legal system; (2) a narrative of how the system currently works and the harms caused; and (3) the change needed to bring about the youth-articulated goals for systemic change. This document is intended to be a youth-centered blueprint for change—a tool for community advocates, a framework for policy makers, and a call-in to the many institutional actors to center the leadership …


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Jan 2022

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Hernández V. Mesa: A Case For A More Meaningful Partnership With The Inter-American Commission On Human Rights, Peyton Jacobsen Jan 2022

Hernández V. Mesa: A Case For A More Meaningful Partnership With The Inter-American Commission On Human Rights, Peyton Jacobsen

Seattle University Law Review

Through an in-depth examination of Hernández, the Inter-American Human Rights System, and the success of Mexico’s partnership with said system, this Note will make a case for embracing human rights bodies— specifically, the Inter-American System on Human Rights—as an appropriate and necessary check on the structures that form the United States government. Part I will look closely at the reasoning and judicially created doctrine that guided the decision in Hernández, with the goal of providing a better understanding of the complicated path through the courts that led to a seemingly straightforward yet unsatisfying result. Part II will illustrate the scope …


Session 1: Access To Legal Services - The Role Of Innovation And Technology, Steven Bender, Stacy Butler, Anna Carpenter, Michael Cherry, Sands Mckinley, Kimball Dean Parker, Miguel Willis Jun 2021

Session 1: Access To Legal Services - The Role Of Innovation And Technology, Steven Bender, Stacy Butler, Anna Carpenter, Michael Cherry, Sands Mckinley, Kimball Dean Parker, Miguel Willis

SITIE Symposiums

This expert panel is addressing access to justice problems. People without access to lawyers and legal services suffer in many ways not limited to divorce, domestic violence, and educational roadblocks. This panel will ask what lawyers can do to help, in what ways can technology help or replace lawyers in the delivery of legal and non-legal services. It will also explore different legal services being offered by individuals who do not have a JD, online firms, and developing technology in a law firm owed subsidiary. There are six panelists who are broken into two categories: (1) the innovation and delivery …


Rebalancing Bracker Forty Years Later, William Mcclure, Thomas E. Mcclure May 2021

Rebalancing Bracker Forty Years Later, William Mcclure, Thomas E. Mcclure

American Indian Law Journal

This Article examines forty years of federal and state courts’ application of the Bracker balancing test, which considers whether a state tax is preempted when assessed against a non-Indian on tribal land. First, this Article chronicles the history and progression of the Bracker balancing test in the Supreme Court. Second, this Article cross-tabulates judicial findings of no preemption with key characteristics of all lower court state taxation decisions that cite Bracker. Third, this Article reports the results of regression analyses that reveal lower courts were less likely to find preemption of cigarette taxes, more likely to find state fuel …


Unqualified? Investing In Qualified Opportunity Zones On Reservations, Ben Gibson May 2021

Unqualified? Investing In Qualified Opportunity Zones On Reservations, Ben Gibson

American Indian Law Journal

This paper evaluates the impact of qualified opportunity zones, created by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, on Indian reservations. The former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers hailed the qualified opportunity zone program as the part of the TCJA of which he was most proud. But the program has not benefited all intended beneficiaries equally. The author of this paper collects data about the presence of qualified opportunity zones on Indian reservations. Compared to other areas designated as qualified opportunity zones, Indian Reservations were disproportionately underinvested in. The author evaluates the comparative lack of qualified opportunity …


Beyond A Sliver Of A Full Moon: Acknowledging And Abolishing White Bias To Restore Safety & Sovereignty To Indian Country, Mary T. Hannon May 2021

Beyond A Sliver Of A Full Moon: Acknowledging And Abolishing White Bias To Restore Safety & Sovereignty To Indian Country, Mary T. Hannon

American Indian Law Journal

Violence against indigenous women in the United States is unprecedented. This violence is aggravated by the fact that indigenous women are often unable to obtain justice for the crimes against them due to a complex jurisdictional scheme that ignores the inherent authority of the First Nations. This scheme is the product of centuries of white bias – perpetuated by contemporary legislators and the judiciary – that treats the First Nations and tribal courts as inferior. In the context of Congress’s recent attempt to expand protection for indigenous women in the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019, this Note will …


Case Law On American Indians, Thomas P. Schlosser May 2021

Case Law On American Indians, Thomas P. Schlosser

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Rock And Hard Place Arguments, Jareb Gleckel, Grace Brosofsky Jan 2021

Rock And Hard Place Arguments, Jareb Gleckel, Grace Brosofsky

Seattle University Law Review

This Article explores what we coin “rock and hard place” (RHP) arguments in the law, and it aims to motivate mission-driven plaintiffs to seek out such arguments in their cases. The RHP argument structure helps plaintiffs win cases even when the court views that outcome as unfavorable.

We begin by dissecting RHP dilemmas that have long existed in the American legal system. As Part I reveals, prosecutors and law enforcement officials have often taken advantage of RHP dilemmas and used them as a tool to persuade criminal defendants to forfeit their constitutional rights, confess, or give up the chance to …


American Edibles: How Cannabis Regulatory Policy Rehashes Prohibitionist Fears And What To Do About It, Connor Burns, Jay Wexler Jan 2021

American Edibles: How Cannabis Regulatory Policy Rehashes Prohibitionist Fears And What To Do About It, Connor Burns, Jay Wexler

Seattle University Law Review

Why can’t we buy a cannabis muffin with our morning coffee? For much of the past century, the answer was simple: cannabis was illegal. Now, however, with more and more states legalizing cannabis for adult use, the answer is far less clear. Even in those states that have legalized cannabis, the simple action of buying and eating edibles at the same location has somehow remained a pipe dream despite consumer demand. Digging a little deeper, we can see how contemporary alarmism—by rehashing the same prohibitionist rhetoric demonizing cannabis for over eighty years—has once again arisen with a new target: cannabis-infused …


Time To Panic! The Need For State Laws Mandating Panic Buttons And Anti-Sexual Harassment Policies To Protect Vulnerable Employees In The Hotel Industry, Kristy D'Angelo-Corker Jan 2021

Time To Panic! The Need For State Laws Mandating Panic Buttons And Anti-Sexual Harassment Policies To Protect Vulnerable Employees In The Hotel Industry, Kristy D'Angelo-Corker

Seattle University Law Review

One only has to turn on the television or read the newspaper to see news story after news story reporting instances of women facing harassment, discrimination, or assault while at work. The “Me Too” and “Time’s Up” campaigns have brought many of these issues to the forefront and have shown that women are fighting to be respected and demanding equal treatment. Although this fight for equal protection is ongoing, many women, such as those in lower-paying service industries, are still unable to protect themselves from sexual harassment, discrimination, and assault, as they do not have the support or power to …


School “Safety” Measures Jump Constitutional Guardrails, Maryam Ahranjani Jan 2021

School “Safety” Measures Jump Constitutional Guardrails, Maryam Ahranjani

Seattle University Law Review

In the wake of George Floyd’s murder and efforts to achieve racial justice through systemic reform, this Article argues that widespread “security” measures in public schools, including embedded law enforcement officers, jump constitutional guardrails. These measures must be rethought in light of their negative impact on all children and in favor of more effective—and constitutionally compliant—alternatives to promote school safety. The Black Lives Matter, #DefundthePolice, #abolishthepolice, and #DefundSchoolPolice movements shine a timely and bright spotlight on how the prisonization of public schools leads to the mistreatment of children, particularly children with disabilities, boys, Black and brown children, and low-income children. …


Duress In Immigration Law, Elizabeth A. Keyes Jan 2021

Duress In Immigration Law, Elizabeth A. Keyes

Seattle University Law Review

The doctrine of duress is common to other bodies of law, but the application of the duress doctrine is both unclear and highly unstable in immigration law. Outside of immigration law, a person who commits a criminal act out of well-placed fear of terrible consequences is different than a person who willingly commits a crime, but American immigration law does not recognize this difference. The lack of clarity leads to certain absurd results and demands reimagining, redefinition, and an unequivocal statement of the significance of duress in ascertaining culpability. While there are inevitably some difficult lines to be drawn in …


No, The Firing Squad Is Not Better Than Lethal Injection: A Response To Stephanie Moran’S A Modest Proposal, Michael Conklin Jan 2021

No, The Firing Squad Is Not Better Than Lethal Injection: A Response To Stephanie Moran’S A Modest Proposal, Michael Conklin

Seattle University Law Review

In the article A Modest Proposal: The Federal Government Should Use Firing Squads to Execute Federal Death Row Inmates, Stephanie Moran argues that the firing squad is the only execution method that meets the requirements of the Eighth Amendment. In order to make her case, Moran unjustifiably overstates the negative aspects of lethal injection while understating the negative aspects of firing squads. The entire piece is predicated upon assumptions that are not only unsupported by the evidence but often directly refuted by the evidence. This Essay critically analyzes Moran’s claims regarding the alleged advantages of the firing squad over …


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Jan 2021

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents.


Systemic Racism And Immigration Detention, Carrie L. Rosenbaum Jan 2021

Systemic Racism And Immigration Detention, Carrie L. Rosenbaum

Seattle University Law Review

The denouement of the Trump presidency was a white supremacist coup attempt against a backdrop of public reawakening to the persistence of institutionalized racism. Though the United States has entered a new administration with a leader that expresses his commitment to ending institutionalized racism, the United States continues to imprison Central American and Mexican immigrants at the southern border. If the majority of the people in immigration jails at the border are Latinx, does immigration law disparately impact them, and do they have a right to equal protection? If they do, would equal protection protect them? This Article explores whether …


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Jan 2021

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Rehabilitative Justice: The Effectiveness Of Healing To Wellness, Opioid Intervention, And Drug Courts, Majidah M. Cochran, Christine L. Kettel Dec 2020

Rehabilitative Justice: The Effectiveness Of Healing To Wellness, Opioid Intervention, And Drug Courts, Majidah M. Cochran, Christine L. Kettel

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Justice Sonia Sotomayor: The Court’S Premier Defender Of The Fourth Amendment, David L. Hudson Jr. Oct 2020

Justice Sonia Sotomayor: The Court’S Premier Defender Of The Fourth Amendment, David L. Hudson Jr.

Seattle University Law Review

This essay posits that Justice Sotomayor is the Court’s chief defender of the Fourth Amendment and the cherished values it protects. She has consistently defended Fourth Amendment freedoms—in majority, concurring, and especially in dissenting opinions. Part I recounts a few of her majority opinions in Fourth Amendment cases. Part II examines her concurring opinion in United States v. Jones. Part III examines several of her dissenting opinions in Fourth Amendment cases. A review of these opinions demonstrates what should be clear to any observer of the Supreme Court: Justice Sotomayor consistently defends Fourth Amendment principles and values.


“Don’T Move”: Redefining “Physical Restraint” In Light Of A United States Circuit Court Divide, Julia Knitter Oct 2020

“Don’T Move”: Redefining “Physical Restraint” In Light Of A United States Circuit Court Divide, Julia Knitter

Seattle University Law Review

To reduce sentencing disparities and clarify the application of the sentencing guide to the physical restraint enhancement for a robbery conviction, this Comment argues that the United States Sentencing Commission (USSC) must amend the USSC Guidelines Manual to provide federal courts with a clearer and more concise definition of physical restraint. Additionally, although there are many state-level sentencing systems throughout the United States, this Comment only focuses on the federal sentencing guidelines for robbery because of the disparate way in which these guidelines are applied from circuit to circuit.