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2008

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Articles 1 - 30 of 274

Full-Text Articles in Law

Prologue To District Of Columbia Democracy And The Third Branch Of Government, John W. Nields, Timothy J. May Dec 2008

Prologue To District Of Columbia Democracy And The Third Branch Of Government, John W. Nields, Timothy J. May

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Why does the President of the United States appoint the judges of the District of Columbia's local court system? Why is the District of Columbia's local court system funded and overseen by the United States Congress? Why does the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia and not the Attorney General for the District of Columbia function as a local prosecutor, prosecuting most D.C. Code crimes in the District of Columbia's courts? The four essays which follow this introduction explore the rich history behind these unusual structural features of the District of Columbia government; they present the arguments for …


A Thirty-Year Retrospective. Comments Of The Honorable Gregory E. Mize (Ret.), Gregory E. Mize Dec 2008

A Thirty-Year Retrospective. Comments Of The Honorable Gregory E. Mize (Ret.), Gregory E. Mize

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Organization, Budgeting, And Funding Of The District Of Columbia's Local Courts, Peter R. Kolker Dec 2008

Organization, Budgeting, And Funding Of The District Of Columbia's Local Courts, Peter R. Kolker

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The mechanism for funding the District of Columbia's local court system reflects the unique and complex character of the District. The means and method of budgeting for and funding this vital function has evolved over the years, reflecting the maturation of the District from its pre-Home Rule days to the present. This evolution is a reflection of the District's growing pains and financial crises, as well as the unusual symbiosis and tension between the District and the federal government. The budget system is also the product of the limitations imposed on the District's restricted taxing authority, which results in a …


Should The District Of Columbia Have Responsibility For The Prosecution Of Criminal Offenses Arising Under The District Of Columbia Code?, John Payton Dec 2008

Should The District Of Columbia Have Responsibility For The Prosecution Of Criminal Offenses Arising Under The District Of Columbia Code?, John Payton

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Comments On Who Appoints D.C. Judges, Daniel A. Rezneck Dec 2008

Comments On Who Appoints D.C. Judges, Daniel A. Rezneck

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Keynote Address Of Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, Eleanor Holmes Norton Dec 2008

Keynote Address Of Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, Eleanor Holmes Norton

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The District Of Columbia's Judicial Selection Process: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly, Patricia M. Worthy Dec 2008

The District Of Columbia's Judicial Selection Process: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly, Patricia M. Worthy

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Legal And Constitutional Foundations For The District Of Columbia Judicial Branch, Steven M. Schneebaum Dec 2008

The Legal And Constitutional Foundations For The District Of Columbia Judicial Branch, Steven M. Schneebaum

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Who Should Appoint Judges Of The D.C. Courts?, Charles A. Miller Dec 2008

Who Should Appoint Judges Of The D.C. Courts?, Charles A. Miller

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Since 1970, the District of Columbia court system has been comprised of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals and the Superior Court of the District of Columbia.' From the time of the establishment of the District, judges of its courts have been appointed by the President of the United States, acting on the advice of the Attorney General. When the general issue of District home rule came before Congress in the 1960s, one of the subjects considered was the judicial appointment process. In 1970, the District of Columbia Court Reform and Criminal Procedure Act 2 continued the Presidential appointment …


Circumventing Congress: How The Federal Courts Opened The Door To Impeaching Criminal Defendants With Prior Convictions, Jeffrey Bellin Dec 2008

Circumventing Congress: How The Federal Courts Opened The Door To Impeaching Criminal Defendants With Prior Convictions, Jeffrey Bellin

Faculty Publications

This Article spotlights the flawed analytical framework at the heart of the federal courts’ approach to one of the most controversial trial practices in American criminal jurisprudence — the admission of prior convictions to impeach the credibility of defendants who testify. As the Article explains, the flawed approach is a byproduct of the courts’ reliance on a five-factor analytical framework to implement the governing legal standard enacted by Congress in Federal Rule of Evidence 609. Tracing the evolution of the fivefactor framework from its roots in pre-Rule 609 case law, the Article demonstrates that the courts’ reinterpretation of the framework …


Where Equity Meets Expertise: Re-Thinking Appellate Review In Complex Litigation, Michael J. Hays Dec 2008

Where Equity Meets Expertise: Re-Thinking Appellate Review In Complex Litigation, Michael J. Hays

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The field of complex litigation continues to grow as both an academic study and a popular phenomenon. One cannot escape news accounts of major class action litigation, and lawyers continue to find new ways to push the outer bounds of civil litigation practices to accommodate large-scale disputes involving multiple claims or parties. Many question whether traditional procedures can or should apply to these cases. Drawing on this well-recognized procedural tension, this Article explores the relationship between trial and appellate courts in complex litigation and argues for a revised standard of appellate review for trial court decisions affecting the party structure …


Reasonable Suspicion Or Real Likelihood: A Question Of Semantics? Re Shankar Alan S/O Anant Kulkarni, Lionel Leo, Siyuan Chen Dec 2008

Reasonable Suspicion Or Real Likelihood: A Question Of Semantics? Re Shankar Alan S/O Anant Kulkarni, Lionel Leo, Siyuan Chen

Research Collection Yong Pung How School Of Law

The law on apparent bias has been mired in some controversy following the High Court decision of Re Shankar Alan s/o Anant Kulkarni, where Sundaresh Menon J.C. seemingly departed from the tentative views of Andrew Phang J.C. (as he then was) in Tang Kin Hwa v. Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board on the issue of whether there were any material differences between the “reasonable suspicion of bias” test and the “real likelihood of bias” test, the two formulations of the test for apparent bias that have been variously adopted by different jurisdictions in the common law world. In Tang Kin …


The Right Thing For Juveniles, Tamar R. Birckhead Nov 2008

The Right Thing For Juveniles, Tamar R. Birckhead

Tamar R Birckhead

This op-ed argues that the upper age of juvenile court jurisdiction in North Carolina should be raised from 16 to 18.


El Fallo Ate Y Sus Circunstancias (Elementos Para Su Estudio), Horacio M. Lynch Nov 2008

El Fallo Ate Y Sus Circunstancias (Elementos Para Su Estudio), Horacio M. Lynch

Horacio M. LYNCH

Estudio sobre el histórico fallo de la Corte Suprema sobre la libertad sindical (el fallo ATE).


A Unified Theory Of 28 U.S.C. § 1331 Jurisdiction, Lumen N. Mulligan Nov 2008

A Unified Theory Of 28 U.S.C. § 1331 Jurisdiction, Lumen N. Mulligan

Lumen N. Mulligan

Title 28, section 1331 of the United States Code provides the jurisdictional grounding for the majority of cases heard in the federal courts, yet it is not well understood. The predominant view holds that section 1331 doctrine both lacks a focus upon congressional intent and is internally inconsistent. I seek to counter both these assumptions by re-contextualizing the Court’s section 1331 jurisprudence in terms of the contemporary judicial usage of “right” (i.e., clear, mandatory obligations capable of judicial enforcement) and cause of action (i.e., permission to vindicate a right in court). In conducting this reinterpretation, I argue that section 1331 …


The Chesterfield/Colonial Heights Drug Court: A Partnership Between The Criminal Justice System And The Treatment Community, Hon. Frederick G. Rockwell Iii Nov 2008

The Chesterfield/Colonial Heights Drug Court: A Partnership Between The Criminal Justice System And The Treatment Community, Hon. Frederick G. Rockwell Iii

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Issue 1: Table Of Contents Nov 2008

Issue 1: Table Of Contents

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Criminal Law And Procedure, Marla G. Decker, Stephen R. Mccullough Nov 2008

Criminal Law And Procedure, Marla G. Decker, Stephen R. Mccullough

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Marshall V. Northern Virginia Transportation Authority: The Supreme Court Of Virginia Rules That Taxes Can Be Imposed By Elected Bodies Only, Patrick M. Mcsweeney, Wesley G. Russell Jr. Nov 2008

Marshall V. Northern Virginia Transportation Authority: The Supreme Court Of Virginia Rules That Taxes Can Be Imposed By Elected Bodies Only, Patrick M. Mcsweeney, Wesley G. Russell Jr.

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Unified Theory Of 28 U.S.C. Section 1331 Jurisdiction, Lumen N. Mulligan Nov 2008

A Unified Theory Of 28 U.S.C. Section 1331 Jurisdiction, Lumen N. Mulligan

Faculty Works

Title 28, section 1331 of the United States Code provides the jurisdictional grounding for the majority of cases heard in the federal courts, yet it is not well understood. The predominant view holds that section 1331 doctrine both lacks a focus upon congressional intent and is internally inconsistent. I seek to counter both these assumptions by re-contextualizing the Court's section 1331 jurisprudence in terms of the contemporary judicial usage of right (i.e., clear, mandatory obligations capable of judicial enforcement) and cause of action (i.e., permission to vindicate a right in court). In conducting this reinterpretation, I argue that section 1331 …


An Ounce Of Prevention: Solving Some Unforeseen Problems With The Proposed Amendments To Rule 56 And The Federal Summary Judgment Process, Adam N. Steinman Nov 2008

An Ounce Of Prevention: Solving Some Unforeseen Problems With The Proposed Amendments To Rule 56 And The Federal Summary Judgment Process, Adam N. Steinman

Faculty Scholarship

The Civil Rules Advisory Committee has recently proposed the most significant revisions to Rule 56 since the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were adopted seventy years ago. Although the stated goal of the proposed amendments is laudable - "to improve the procedures for making and opposing summary-judgment motions, and to facilitate the judge's work in resolving them" - this Essay in the Northwestern University Law Review Colloquy identifies some unanticipated problems with the proposed text. Contrary to the Advisory Committee's intent, the proposed text may inadvertently make substantial changes to the summary-judgment standard and the burdens on litigants at the …


Practice Makes Perfect? An Empirical Study Of Claim Construction Reversal Rates In Patent Cases, David L. Schwartz Nov 2008

Practice Makes Perfect? An Empirical Study Of Claim Construction Reversal Rates In Patent Cases, David L. Schwartz

Michigan Law Review

This Article examines whether U.S. district court judges improve their skills at patent claim construction with experience, including the experience of having their own cases reviewed by the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. In theory, higher courts teach doctrine to lower courts via judicial decisions, and lower courts learn from these decisions. This Article tests the teaching-and-learning premise on the issue of claim construction in the realities of patent litigation. While others have shown that the Federal Circuit reverses a large percentage of lower court claim constructions, no one has analyzed whether judges with more claim construction appeal …


Rowan, John, 1773-1843 (Sc 1787), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2008

Rowan, John, 1773-1843 (Sc 1787), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and scan (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 1787. Photocopy of will of prominent Kentucky jurist and Congressman John Rowan, written 28 June 1840 in Louisville, Kentucky.


Publicidad Desleal. Publicidad Comparativa. ¿Dónde Está El Límite?, Gabriel Martinez Medrano Oct 2008

Publicidad Desleal. Publicidad Comparativa. ¿Dónde Está El Límite?, Gabriel Martinez Medrano

Gabriel Martinez Medrano

No abstract provided.


On Jurisdictional Elephants And Kangaroo Courts, Stephen I. Vladeck Oct 2008

On Jurisdictional Elephants And Kangaroo Courts, Stephen I. Vladeck

NULR Online

No abstract provided.


Monroe County, Kentucky - Records, 1826-1842 (Sc 1761), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2008

Monroe County, Kentucky - Records, 1826-1842 (Sc 1761), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid for Manuscripts Small Collection 1761. Record book of William G. Howard documenting his duties as a Justice of the Peace. It includes stray notices, legal judgments, and marriages performed (Click on "Additional Files" below for typescripted list of marriages.)


Solidifying Judicial Discretion Through Statutory Interpretation: The Implications Of United States V. Nelson On Criminal Sentencing, Tashama Williams Oct 2008

Solidifying Judicial Discretion Through Statutory Interpretation: The Implications Of United States V. Nelson On Criminal Sentencing, Tashama Williams

North Carolina Central Law Review

No abstract provided.


Judicial Foreign Policy: Lessons From The 1790s, David Sloss Oct 2008

Judicial Foreign Policy: Lessons From The 1790s, David Sloss

Faculty Publications

This Article demonstrates that the exclusive political control thesis is incompatible with the original understanding of the Founders. The Article does not defend originalism as a method of constitutional interpretation; it merely shows that the exclusive political control thesis is inconsistent with an originalist approach.

The Article examines the implementation of U.S. neutrality policy in the period from 1793 to 1797. Other scholars have analyzed the initial formulation of U.S. neutrality policy in 1793. Scholars who focus narrowly on the year 1793, when the United States first articulated its neutrality policy, have concluded that "the federal courts played a relatively …


Pleading Civil Rights Claims In The Post-Conley Era, A. Benjamin Spencer Oct 2008

Pleading Civil Rights Claims In The Post-Conley Era, A. Benjamin Spencer

Faculty Publications

Much has been made of the Supreme Court's recent pronouncements on federal civil pleading standards during the latter half of the 2006-2007 Term. Specifically, what will be the fallout from the Court's decision in Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, a case that abrogated Conley v. Gibson's famous "no set of facts" formulation and supplanted it with a new plausibility pleading standard? This Article attempts to examine and distill the impact of Twombly on the pleading standards that lower federal courts are applying when scrutinizing civil rights claims. Two main approaches emerge: that of courts choosing to continue to apply a …


The Supreme Common Law Court Of The United States, Jack M. Beermann Oct 2008

The Supreme Common Law Court Of The United States, Jack M. Beermann

Faculty Scholarship

The U.S. Supreme Court's primary role in the history of the United States, especially in constitutional cases (and cases hovering in the universe of the Constitution), has been to limit Congress's ability to redefine and redistribute rights in a direction most people would characterize as liberal. In other words, the Supreme Court, for most of the history of the United States since the adoption of the Constitution, has been a conservative force against change and redistribution. The Court has used five distinct devices to advance its control over the law. First, it has construed rights-creating constitutional provisions narrowly when those …