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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Roots Of Collapse: Imposing Constitutional Governance, Catherine Baylin Duryea Jan 2022

The Roots Of Collapse: Imposing Constitutional Governance, Catherine Baylin Duryea

Faculty Publications

The foundational assumption of constitutional governance poses a conundrum for contemporary state-builders: a constitution heavily influenced by foreigners does not represent the views of the governed. Can a modern state-building effort foster democratic institutions when the new government reflects foreign? Nowhere was this tension more apparent than in Afghanistan, where the United States and the United Nations were heavily involved in drafting the 2004 Constitution. They shaped the process from the initial framework to the final, frenzied approval. Foreigners were engaged at both the procedural level—determining how the negotiations would occur and who would participate—and at the substantive level—providing input …


Persuasion About/Without International Law: The Case Of Cybersecurity Norms, Steven R. Ratner Jan 2021

Persuasion About/Without International Law: The Case Of Cybersecurity Norms, Steven R. Ratner

Book Chapters

International law on cybersecurity is characterized by at best a thin consensus on the existence of rules, their meaning, and the desirability and content of new rules. This legal landscape results in a unique pattern of argumentation and persuasion by states and non-state actors both in advocating for a regulatory scheme for cyber activity and in reacting to malicious cyber acts. By examining argumentation in the absence of a generally agreed legal framework, this chapter seeks to provide new insights into the motivations for and effects of international legal argumentation in shaping debates and behavior. After describing the legal landscape …


Global Apathy And The Need For A New, Cooperative International Refugee Response, Emily Gleichert Dec 2020

Global Apathy And The Need For A New, Cooperative International Refugee Response, Emily Gleichert

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

While an increasing number of nations move toward isolationist, nationalist policies, the number of refugees worldwide is climbing to its highest levels since World War II. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is the international body tasked with protecting this population. However, the office’s traditional solutions for refugees – local integration, resettlement in a third country, and voluntary repatriation – have mostly eluded refugees who spend an average of twenty years in exile. The limitations UNHCR’s structure imposes on the office, specifically in its ability to fund its operations and compel nations to act, have contributed to its …


The Law Of The Seas: A Barrier To Implementation Of Sustainable Development Goal 14, Alexi Nathan Oct 2017

The Law Of The Seas: A Barrier To Implementation Of Sustainable Development Goal 14, Alexi Nathan

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


A North-South Struggle: Political And Economic Obstacles To Sustainable Development, Imrana Iqbal, Charles Pierson Oct 2017

A North-South Struggle: Political And Economic Obstacles To Sustainable Development, Imrana Iqbal, Charles Pierson

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


The Modern Treaty-Executing Power: Constitutional Complexities In Contemporary Global Governance, Carlo Felizardo Oct 2016

The Modern Treaty-Executing Power: Constitutional Complexities In Contemporary Global Governance, Carlo Felizardo

Northwestern University Law Review

Treaties have evolved significantly since the ratification of the United States Constitution, leading to uncertainty as to the constitutional limits on their domestic execution. This Note adapts existing constitutional doctrine on treaty execution to two distinct complications arising in the contemporary treaty regime. First, voluntary treaties imposing aspirational obligations on signatories raise the issue of the extent of obligations that Congress may domestically enforce by federal statute. Second, originating treaties which create international organizations and authorize them to adopt rule- and adjudication-type post-treaty pronouncements bring up a question of when, if ever, to incorporate those pronouncements into U.S. law, and …


The Commonwealth Of Puerto Rico: Trying To Gain Dignity And Maintain Culture, Arnold Leibowitz Apr 2015

The Commonwealth Of Puerto Rico: Trying To Gain Dignity And Maintain Culture, Arnold Leibowitz

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Behavioral War Powers, Ganesh Sitaraman, David Zionts Jan 2015

Behavioral War Powers, Ganesh Sitaraman, David Zionts

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

A decade of war has meant a decade of writing on war powers. From the authority to start a war, to restrictions on fighting wars, to the authority to end a war, constitutional lawyers and scholars have explored the classic issues (war initiation, prosecution, and termination) through the classic prisms (text, history, and function) for a new generation of national security challenges. Despite the volume of writing on war powers and the urgency of the debates in the context of Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, and Syria, war powers debates are widely seen as stagnant. We introduce a new set of perspectives …


United States Attitudes Toward Ratification Of Human Rights Instruments, Louis B. Sohn Nov 2014

United States Attitudes Toward Ratification Of Human Rights Instruments, Louis B. Sohn

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Jurisprudence Of Discrimination As Opposed To Simple Inequality In The International Civil Service, Brian D. Patterson Sep 2014

The Jurisprudence Of Discrimination As Opposed To Simple Inequality In The International Civil Service, Brian D. Patterson

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


America's Forgotten Constitutions: Defiant Visions Of Power And Community, Robert Tsai Mar 2014

America's Forgotten Constitutions: Defiant Visions Of Power And Community, Robert Tsai

Robert L Tsai

The U.S. Constitution opens by proclaiming the sovereignty of all citizens: "We the People." Robert Tsai's gripping history of alternative constitutions invites readers into the circle of those who have rejected this ringing assertion--the defiant groups that refused to accept the Constitution's definition of who "the people" are and how their authority should be exercised. America's Forgotten Constitutions is the story of America as told by dissenters: squatters, Native Americans, abolitionists, socialists, internationalists, and racial nationalists. Beginning in the nineteenth century, Tsai chronicles eight episodes in which discontented citizens took the extraordinary step of drafting a new constitution. He examines …


In The Interests Of Justice: Human Rights And The Right To Counsel In Civil Cases, Martha F. Davis Apr 2013

In The Interests Of Justice: Human Rights And The Right To Counsel In Civil Cases, Martha F. Davis

Touro Law Review

This report examines the international human rights treaties binding on the United States as well as other non-binding international human rights documents to ascertain the status of the right to counsel in civil cases, the so-called "Civil Gideon" right. The United Nations treaty monitoring bodies responsible for the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination have both indicated that legal assistance may be required to ensure fairness in civil cases. The Charter of the Organization of American States, to which the United States is a party, goes farther …


Social Protection Afforded To Irregular Migrant Workers: Thoughts On International Norms, The Southern African Development Community, Botswana And South Africa, Bruno Ps Van Eck, Felicia Snyman Mar 2013

Social Protection Afforded To Irregular Migrant Workers: Thoughts On International Norms, The Southern African Development Community, Botswana And South Africa, Bruno Ps Van Eck, Felicia Snyman

Bruno PS Van Eck

The majority of migrant workers target those countries in southern Africa that have stronger economies. Irregular migrants are in a particularly vulnerable position, and this article discusses the protection that this category of persons may expect to experience in the southern African region. The authors recommend that the broad notion of “social protection”, rather than the narrower concept “social security” should be emphasized. International, continental and regional instruments providing protection to irregular migrants are traversed and the constitutional and legislative frameworks in relation to social protection in Botswana and South Africa are compared. The article concludes that there are significant …


Internet Access Rights: A Brief History And Intellectual Origins, Jonathon Penney Jan 2011

Internet Access Rights: A Brief History And Intellectual Origins, Jonathon Penney

Articles, Book Chapters, & Popular Press

If there is anything we have learned from recent protest movements around the world, and the heavy-handed government efforts to block, censor, suspend, and manipulate Internet connectivity, it is that access to the Internet, and its content, is anything but certain, especially when governments feel threatened. Despite these hard truths, the notion that people have a "right" to Internet access gained high-profile international recognition last year. In a report to the United Nations General Assembly in early 2011, Frank La Rue, the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, held that Internet access should be recognized as a "human right". …


Internet Access Rights: A Brief History And Intellectual Origins, Jonathon Penney Jan 2011

Internet Access Rights: A Brief History And Intellectual Origins, Jonathon Penney

Articles, Book Chapters, & Popular Press

If there is anything we have learned from recent protest movements around the world, and the heavy-handed government efforts to block, censor, suspend, and manipulate Internet connectivity, it is that access to the Internet, and its content, is anything but certain, especially when governments feel threatened. Despite these hard truths, the notion that people have a "right" to Internet access gained high-profile international recognition last year. In a report to the United Nations General Assembly in early 2011, Frank La Rue, the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, held that Internet access should be recognized as a "human right". …


The Perils Of "Consensus": Hans Kelsen And The Legal Philosophy Of The United Nations, J. Peter Pham Aug 2003

The Perils Of "Consensus": Hans Kelsen And The Legal Philosophy Of The United Nations, J. Peter Pham

ExpressO

Recently the United States and a number of its traditional allies have clashed over a variety of foreign policy issues that are profoundly juridical: the authority for war and peace, the International Criminal Court, etc. The source of these recent tensions is to be located at a level deeper than that of narrow national interests and specific policies. Rather, they arise from significant differences concerning the nature of "consensus" and, ultimately, legal philosophy. While the United Nations and many other international organizations derive their legal visions from the philosophy of law of Hans Kelsen (1881-1973), one of the most important …


How To Constitutionalize International Law And Foreign Policy For The Benefit Of Civil Society?, Ernst-Ulrich Petersmann Jan 1998

How To Constitutionalize International Law And Foreign Policy For The Benefit Of Civil Society?, Ernst-Ulrich Petersmann

Michigan Journal of International Law

All societies have adopted rules in order to reconcile conflicts among the short-term interests of their citizens with their common long-term interests. All societies have learned that rule-making and rule-enforcement require government powers, as well as "checks and balances" against abuses of such powers. Constitutionalism has emerged as the most important human invention for protecting equal rights of the citizens against such abuses. It rests on the rationality of Ulysses who, when approaching the island of the sirens and knowing of their dangers, ordered his companions to bind him to the mast and not to release him under any circumstances.' …


Defining And Punishing Abroad: Constitutional Limits On The Extraterritorial Reach Of The Offenses Clause Note, Zephyr Teachout Jan 1998

Defining And Punishing Abroad: Constitutional Limits On The Extraterritorial Reach Of The Offenses Clause Note, Zephyr Teachout

Faculty Scholarship

The Offenses Clause of the United States Constitution gives Congress the authority to "define and punish... Offences against the Law of Nations." This Note considers whether Congress must conform to the jurisdictional rules of customary international law when legislating pursuant to the Offenses Clause.


The United Nations And Human Rights And The Contribution Of The American Bill Of Rights, Jan Martenson May 1992

The United Nations And Human Rights And The Contribution Of The American Bill Of Rights, Jan Martenson

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


The Age Of Rights, Stephen D. Sencer May 1992

The Age Of Rights, Stephen D. Sencer

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Age of Rights by Louis Henkin


Forcing Sovereign Conformity: The Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act Of 1986, Joseph L. Miljak Jan 1988

Forcing Sovereign Conformity: The Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act Of 1986, Joseph L. Miljak

Cleveland State Law Review

One focus of this Note is to analyze the international repercussions of the Anti-Apartheid Act within the context of United States foreign policy, the sovereignty rights of South Africa, the jurisdiction of United States courts to pass on violations of the Act, and United Nations provisions governing interference with the economy of a foreign government. However, before any discussion of the international legality of this Act can take place, its domestic legality must be determined. Therefore, before looking to international justifications for the Act, this Note will analyze it within the context of United States constitutional law. This analysis will …


The Effect Of Duress On The Iranian Hostage Settlement Agreement, James M. Redwine Jan 1981

The Effect Of Duress On The Iranian Hostage Settlement Agreement, James M. Redwine

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

As soon as the United States began celebrating the hostages' release, the validity of the agreement became a subject of intense controversy. Conservative commentators urged that the United States "renounce the deal." To them, the Declaration was not an agreement but extortion, and had "the same moral standing as an agreement made with a kidnapper, that is to say, none at all..."

Although it will take years of litigation and commentary to assess the full significance and consequences of the hostage taking and the settlement agreement, some preliminary observations may be made. The Declaration poses many difficult questions of international …


Books Received, Journal Staff Jan 1976

Books Received, Journal Staff

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

Books Received

AFRICAN GOALS AND DIPLOMATIC STRATEGIES IN THE UNITED NATIONS By Moses E. Akpan

North Quincy, Mass.: Christopher Publishing House, 1976. Pp. 165. $9.95.

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BASIC PROBLEMS OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY

Edited by P.D. Dagtoglou

Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1975. Pp. xvii, 286, $18.00.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY ON TAXATION OF FOREIGN OPERATIONS AND FOREIGNERS: 1968-1975

By Elisabeth Owens & Gretchen Hovemeyer

Cambridge, Mass.: International Tax Program, Harvard Law School,1976. Pp. xiii, 107. $7.50.

==============

THE CONSTITUTION AND THE CONDUCT OF FOREIGN POLICY

Edited by Francis 0. Wilcox and Richard A. Frank

New York: Praeger Publishers, 1976. Pp. xiv, 145. $12.50.

=============== …


Constitutional Law--Executive Agreements--International Law--Executive Authority Concerning The Future Political Status Of The Trust Territory Of The Pacific Islands, Michigan Law Review Apr 1968

Constitutional Law--Executive Agreements--International Law--Executive Authority Concerning The Future Political Status Of The Trust Territory Of The Pacific Islands, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

It is fair to conclude that the President, even in the absence of express congressional authorization, has constitutional authority indeed, a constitutional duty-to carry out those obligations assumed under the Micronesian trusteeship agreement. Execution of this agreement lies within the scope of the authority given the President by the faithful execution clause and by his independent constitutional powers in the area of foreign policy. Thus, it is next necessary to determine the scope of the president's authority under the trusteeship agreement.


Van Doren: The Great Rehearsal, Michigan Law Review Mar 1948

Van Doren: The Great Rehearsal, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of THE GREAT REHEARSAL. By Carl Van Doren.