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Constitutional Law

2009

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Articles 1 - 30 of 816

Full-Text Articles in Law

Appointed To Three Year Term On Finance Committee Of The Town Of Westport, Massachusetts, Charles Baron Aug 2013

Appointed To Three Year Term On Finance Committee Of The Town Of Westport, Massachusetts, Charles Baron

Charles H. Baron

No abstract provided.


Elected To The Board Of Directors Of The Westport River Watershed Alliance, Charles Baron Aug 2013

Elected To The Board Of Directors Of The Westport River Watershed Alliance, Charles Baron

Charles H. Baron

No abstract provided.


Transnational Law In Support Of Science; Science In Support Of Transnational Law, Charles Baron Aug 2013

Transnational Law In Support Of Science; Science In Support Of Transnational Law, Charles Baron

Charles H. Baron

No abstract provided.


Padilla V. Kentucky: Immigration Consequences Due To The Ineffective Assistance Of Counsel, Evangeline Pittman Dec 2009

Padilla V. Kentucky: Immigration Consequences Due To The Ineffective Assistance Of Counsel, Evangeline Pittman

Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy Sidebar

No abstract provided.


Summary Of Stephens Media V. Dist. Court, 125 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 63, John L. Ward Dec 2009

Summary Of Stephens Media V. Dist. Court, 125 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 63, John L. Ward

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

Review of a motion regarding two issues of first impression: (1) determining whether petitioners met the proper procedure whereby the press may file a motion to intervene in a criminal case when seeking access to juror questionnaires, and (2) whether district courts must publicly disclose juror questionnaires.


Separation Of Santa And State Is Smart, Fair, Alan E. Garfield Dec 2009

Separation Of Santa And State Is Smart, Fair, Alan E. Garfield

Alan E Garfield

No abstract provided.


Brief For The Respondants, Holder V. Humanitarian Law Project, Nos. 08-1498, 09-89 (U.S. Dec. 22, 2009), Neal K. Katyal Dec 2009

Brief For The Respondants, Holder V. Humanitarian Law Project, Nos. 08-1498, 09-89 (U.S. Dec. 22, 2009), Neal K. Katyal

U.S. Supreme Court Briefs

No abstract provided.


Unto This Very Purpose, Neal A. Maxwell Dec 2009

Unto This Very Purpose, Neal A. Maxwell

Vol. 2: Service & Integrity

This Founders Day address was given to the J. Reuben Clark Law Society at Little America Hotel in Salt Lake City on September 4, 2003.


Three Strikes And You're Outside The Constitution: Will The Guantanamo Bay Alien Detainees Be Granted Fundamental Due Process?, Michael Greenberger Dec 2009

Three Strikes And You're Outside The Constitution: Will The Guantanamo Bay Alien Detainees Be Granted Fundamental Due Process?, Michael Greenberger

Michael Greenberger

The United States Supreme Court has agreed to take up its first case arising from the War on Terror by hearing the consolidated appeals of two groups of foreign aliens who are or who had been detained at the United States Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba: Rasul v. Bush (No. 03-334) and Al Odah v. United States (No. 03-343). The cases stem from the United States' capture of several hundred prisoners in Afghanistan and Pakistan and their subsequent imprisonment at Guantanamo Bay. The prison began operation in January 2002, and approximately 90 detainees have been freed up to this time ...


The Price Of Fame: Brown As Celebrity, Mark Graber Dec 2009

The Price Of Fame: Brown As Celebrity, Mark Graber

Mark Graber

This essay examines the history of Brown I, Brown II, and Bolling in the Supreme Court of the United States. Enduring precedents, the analysis suggests, go through three stages. In the first stage, they fight for survival. This describes Brown during the first decade after that decision was handed down. No Supreme Court Justice asserted, “Brown should be overruled,” but many citations to Brown came in the context of political efforts to reverse or marginalize that decision. In the second stage, precedents fight for extension. This describes Brown in the later Warren and Burger years. Civil rights activists insisted that ...


Running Cars, Constitutions And Metaphors Into The Ground, Mark A. Graber Dec 2009

Running Cars, Constitutions And Metaphors Into The Ground, Mark A. Graber

Mark Graber

Professor Sanford Levinson frequently analogizes the Constitution of the United States to a vehicle that desperately needs repairs. “[R]elying on the present Constitution.” he writes, “is similar to driving a car with very bad brakes and slick tires.” Much commentary on Our Undemocratic Constitution implicitly challenges the automotive metaphor. The Constitution of the United States, supporters profess, is not really as bad as Levinson would have us believe. The following pages take a road less traveled. Ancient constitutional institutions in the United States are suffering from severe wear and tear. Nevertheless, decisions to drive a comparatively unsafe car are ...


A Potent Federal Prosecutorial Tool: Weyhrauch V. United States, James T. Van Strander Dec 2009

A Potent Federal Prosecutorial Tool: Weyhrauch V. United States, James T. Van Strander

Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy Sidebar

No abstract provided.


The Lodestar Ranger: Calculating Attorneys’ Fee Awards In Perdue V. Kenny A., Rebecca Friedman Dec 2009

The Lodestar Ranger: Calculating Attorneys’ Fee Awards In Perdue V. Kenny A., Rebecca Friedman

Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy Sidebar

No abstract provided.


Nothing But A Northern Lynching: The Death Of Fred Hampton Revisited, Susan Rutberg Dec 2009

Nothing But A Northern Lynching: The Death Of Fred Hampton Revisited, Susan Rutberg

Publications

No abstract provided.


A First Amendment Perspective On The Construction Of Third Party Copyright Liability, Alfred C. Yen Dec 2009

A First Amendment Perspective On The Construction Of Third Party Copyright Liability, Alfred C. Yen

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Third-party copyright liability raises specific First Amendment problems that remain relatively unexplored. Among other things, such liability separates the danger of liability from the benefits of speaking, making key actors prone to careless censorship of speech. This Article applies the First Amendment to third-party copyright liability by drawing lessons from the famous cases of New York Times Co. v. Sullivan and Gertz v. Robert Welch, Inc. It concludes that vicarious liability should be sharply curtailed, and that the application of presumed damages is constitutionally problematic in many contributory liability cases.


Religiosidad, Democracia, Laicismo, Antonio-Carlos Pereira-Menaut Dec 2009

Religiosidad, Democracia, Laicismo, Antonio-Carlos Pereira-Menaut

Antonio-Carlos Pereira-Menaut

In the discussion on religion-democracy-secularism, several Catholic authors make some mistakes. Firstly, they accept a historical «mea culpa» that is not always well founded, and they accept to discuss on State’s terms. They also indulge in «Eurocentrism», and undervalue certain factors in the conflict: the State’s «vocation of Church», Sovereignty, the displacement of politics towards what is personal and the loss of public validity of three important visions: the specific nature of politics, the basic agreement, and the general legal mass of rules and fundamental principles.


Chinese Judicial Pattern: Tradition And Reform(中国的司法模式:传统与改革), Meng Hou Dec 2009

Chinese Judicial Pattern: Tradition And Reform(中国的司法模式:传统与改革), Meng Hou

Hou Meng

No abstract provided.


La Ley De Drogas Vigente Como Sistema Jurídico Paralelo, David Cordero Heredia Dec 2009

La Ley De Drogas Vigente Como Sistema Jurídico Paralelo, David Cordero Heredia

David Cordero Heredia

El artículo analiza como la política internacional anti drogas crea, en Ecuador, un sistema de reglas contrarias a la Constitución y a los tratados internacionales ratificados por el Estado.


Demosprudence, Interactive Federalism, And Twenty Years Of Sheff V. O'Neill, Justin R. Long Dec 2009

Demosprudence, Interactive Federalism, And Twenty Years Of Sheff V. O'Neill, Justin R. Long

Law Faculty Research Publications

Professor Lani Guinier and others have recently developed a theory called "demosprudence" that explains the democracy-enhancing potential of certain types of US. Supreme Court dissents. Separately, state constitutionalists have described state constitutions' capacity to offer a base of resistance against the U.S. Supreme Court's narrow conception of individual rights. Applying these two seemingly unrelated theories to school desegregation litigation in Connecticut and to same-sex marriage litigation in Iowa, this Essay suggests that certain state constitutional decisions might function like U.S. Supreme Court dissents to enhance democratic activism. In this way, interactive federalism might usefully serve as a ...


The Limits Of Executive Power, Robert J. Reinstein Dec 2009

The Limits Of Executive Power, Robert J. Reinstein

American University Law Review

Justice Jackson’s concurring opinion in The Steel Seizure Case has taken on iconic status among legal scholars and had been adopted by the Supreme Court as the governing framework for evaluating presidential power. But Jackson’s principles are conclusory, do not rest on any historical foundation, and raise as many questions as they answer. He fails to examine, much less justify, the existence or scope of implied presidential powers, nor does he meaningfully explain the extent to which those powers are subject to congressional regulation and override. I apply novel originalist methodologies to answer those unexamined questions, with important ...


Turning The Faucet Back On: The Future Of Mccain-Feingold's Soft-Money Ban After Davis V. Federal Election Commission, Kevin J. Madden Dec 2009

Turning The Faucet Back On: The Future Of Mccain-Feingold's Soft-Money Ban After Davis V. Federal Election Commission, Kevin J. Madden

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Separating Church And State: Transfers Of Government Land As Cures For Establishment Clause Violations, Paul Forster Dec 2009

Separating Church And State: Transfers Of Government Land As Cures For Establishment Clause Violations, Paul Forster

Chicago-Kent Law Review

The note examines one of the issues currently before the Supreme Court in Salazar v. Buono, the case concerning a Latin cross war memorial in the Mojave desert. The issue is whether the government may, by transferring land to private parties, cure Establishment Clause violations caused by permanent displays that contain religious imagery. The article surveys the Court's Establishment Clause jurisprudence as it applies to permanent displays, discussing the sometimes-used and sometimes-ignored Lemon-endorsement standard and the potential shift to a coercion standard. It concludes by arguing that even under the Lemon-endorsement standard, courts should often allow the ...


The Irrelevancy Of The Fourth Amendment In The Roberts Court, Thomas K. Clancy Dec 2009

The Irrelevancy Of The Fourth Amendment In The Roberts Court, Thomas K. Clancy

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Since John Roberts Jr. became Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, there has been a measurable decline in the number of cases addressing Fourth Amendment questions. This article examines the reasons for that decline and predicts the substantial elimination of Fourth Amendment litigation in the Roberts Court. The prediction is based on several premises, including the lack of interest of the Justices on the Court concerning search and seizures principles and two significant recent cases, Pearson v. Callahan and United States v. Herring, which presage a significant decline in the number of lower court cases addressing the merits of the ...


The Fourth Amendment, The Exclusionary Rule, And The Roberts Court: Normative And Empirical Dimensions Of The Over-Deterrence Hypothesis, Donald Dripps Dec 2009

The Fourth Amendment, The Exclusionary Rule, And The Roberts Court: Normative And Empirical Dimensions Of The Over-Deterrence Hypothesis, Donald Dripps

Chicago-Kent Law Review

This essay engages in the risky business of predicting future Supreme Court developments. In the first part, I analyze the evidence suggesting that the Roberts Court might abolish the exclusionary rule. The critique of exclusion in Hudson v. Michigan is both less and more probative than appears at first blush. Part II turns to some less obvious evidence pointing in the direction of retaining the exclusionary rule. First, abolition of the exclusionary rule is inconsistent with the Hudson majority's apparent content with prevailing police behavior. Second, abolition of the exclusionary rule would curtail the power of the Supreme Court ...


Replacing The Exclusionary Rule: Fourth Amendment Violations As Direct Criminal Contempt, Ronald J. Rychlak Dec 2009

Replacing The Exclusionary Rule: Fourth Amendment Violations As Direct Criminal Contempt, Ronald J. Rychlak

Chicago-Kent Law Review

The exclusionary rule, which bars from admission evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment's prohibition of unreasonable searches and seizures, is a bedrock of American law. It is highly controversial, but there seems to be no equally effective way to protect citizens' rights. This paper proposes that an admissibility standard be adopted that is in keeping with virtually every jurisdiction around the world other than the United States. Thus, before ruling evidence inadmissible, the court would consider the level of the constitutional violation, the seriousness of the crime, whether the violation casts substantial doubt on the reliability of ...


Mapp V. Ohio'S Unsung Hero: The Suppression Hearing As Morality Play, Scott E. Sundby Dec 2009

Mapp V. Ohio'S Unsung Hero: The Suppression Hearing As Morality Play, Scott E. Sundby

Chicago-Kent Law Review

The exclusionary rule is back under the judicial magnifying glass. Recent opinions, most notably by Justice Scalia, have sparked speculation that the Roberts Court is inclined to overrule Mapp v. Ohio and send Fourth Amendment disputes back to the realm of civil suits and police disciplinary actions. As the Court's rulings have made clear, any reevaluation of the exclusionary rule's future will be conducted under the now familiar rubric of whether the rule's "benefit" of deterring police misbehavior outweighs the "cost" of lost evidence and convictions.

This essay argues that if any such reevaluation does occur, the ...


Fourth Amendment Federalism And The Silencing Of The American Poor, Andrew E. Taslitz Dec 2009

Fourth Amendment Federalism And The Silencing Of The American Poor, Andrew E. Taslitz

Chicago-Kent Law Review

In Virginia v. Moore, police officers searched Moore incident to an arrest for a minor traffic infraction for which Virginia statutory law in fact prohibited arrest. The officers found cocaine on Moore's person, arresting him for that crime too. The United States Supreme Court ultimately found that the arrest for the traffic infraction and the subsequent search were valid under the federal Constitution's Fourth Amendment. Central to the Court's reasoning was its insistence that the state statute was irrelevant. Any contrary conclusion, explained the Court, would wrongly make the Fourth Amendment's meaning vary from place to ...


Melendez-Diaz And The Right To Confrontation, Craig M. Bradley Dec 2009

Melendez-Diaz And The Right To Confrontation, Craig M. Bradley

Chicago-Kent Law Review

In Crawford v. Washington, the Supreme Court overruled Ohio v. Roberts and adopted new law concerning the use of hearsay testimony at criminal trials. This was based on the Sixth Amendment's command that "In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall enjoy the right . . . to be confronted with the witnesses against him .. " On its face this provision seems to say that the accused has the right to cross-examine anybody who testifies for the prosecution at trial, whether as a live witness or through hearsay. The Supreme Court acknowledged much of this in Crawford, but limited the right of cross-examination to ...


Free Speech & Tainted Justice: Restoring The Public's Confidence In The Judiciary In The Wake Of Republican Party Of Minnesota V. White, Gregory W. Jones Dec 2009

Free Speech & Tainted Justice: Restoring The Public's Confidence In The Judiciary In The Wake Of Republican Party Of Minnesota V. White, Gregory W. Jones

Chicago-Kent Law Review

The United States Supreme Court's 2002 decision in Republican Party of Minnesota v. White was the first shot fired in an ongoing battle over judicial campaign ethics. The White decision invalidated a Minnesota Canon of Judicial Conduct prohibiting judicial candidates from announcing their views on disputed legal or political topics. Subsequent to White, numerous states have faced challenges to their judicial canons of conduct by groups advocating for an increased breadth of permissible speech in judicial campaigns. While White and its progeny have safeguarded the first amendment rights of judicial candidates, significant concerns have been raised regarding how best ...


Fair Housing And Roommates: Contesting A Presumption Of Constitutionality, Brooke Wright Dec 2009

Fair Housing And Roommates: Contesting A Presumption Of Constitutionality, Brooke Wright

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.