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Civil Rights and Discrimination

Mercer University School of Law

2012

Mercer Law Review

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

Employment Discrimination, Peter Reed Corbin, John E. Duvall Jun 2012

Employment Discrimination, Peter Reed Corbin, John E. Duvall

Mercer Law Review

The United States Supreme Court was the center of the action in the area of employment discrimination during the 2011 survey period. The most talked about decision was the Court's opinion in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes. The much-anticipated decision in Dukes was the most significant opinion handed down by the Court in the area of employment discrimination class actions since its 1982 decision in General Telephone Co. v. Falcon, and perhaps ever. The Court also continued to broaden the scope of potential Title VII retaliation actions with its decision in Thompson v. North American Stainless, LP. …


Introducing A Surprising Conversation About Conversation, Mark L. Jones May 2012

Introducing A Surprising Conversation About Conversation, Mark L. Jones

Mercer Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reasonable Restrictions On The Franchise: Georgia's Voter Identification Act Of 2006, Joseph M. Colwell May 2012

Reasonable Restrictions On The Franchise: Georgia's Voter Identification Act Of 2006, Joseph M. Colwell

Mercer Law Review

In Democratic Party of Georgia, Inc. v. Perdue, the Georgia Supreme Court declared constitutional the Voter Identification Act of 2006 (2006 Act), insofar as it required registered Georgia voters to present valid photo identification at the polls when voting in person in any Georgia election. The 2006 Act was the most recent amendment in a series of iterations of section 21-2-417 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (O.C.G.A.)-the provision of the Georgia code imposing certain polling requirements for in-person voting. Each version of the law has generated much controversy as to polling and voting requirements in Georgia, and …


Thy Fiancé Doth Protest Too Much: Third- Party Retaliation Under Title Vii After Thompson V. North American Stainless, Lp, Dodson D. Strawbridge Mar 2012

Thy Fiancé Doth Protest Too Much: Third- Party Retaliation Under Title Vii After Thompson V. North American Stainless, Lp, Dodson D. Strawbridge

Mercer Law Review

"To retaliate against a man by hurting a member of his family is an ancient method of revenge . . . ." In Thompson v. North American Stainless, LP, the United States Supreme Court reversed the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit by holding that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) confers standing to sue upon an individual who suffers unlawful retaliation, even though that individual did not engage in any statutorily-protected conduct. Prior to Thompson, lower courts disagreed about whether third-party retaliation victims had proper standing to file suit …