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Full-Text Articles in Law

Fintech And Anti-Money Laundering Regulation: Implementing An International Regulatory Hierarchy Premised On Financial Innovation, Nicholas A Roide Mar 2022

Fintech And Anti-Money Laundering Regulation: Implementing An International Regulatory Hierarchy Premised On Financial Innovation, Nicholas A Roide

Texas A&M Law Review

Innovations in financial technology (“fintech”) have rippling effects across global markets. Fintech firms utilizing virtual assets and disintermediating blockchain technology continue to rapidly grow in strength and number. As systemic risk mounts due to the inter-jurisdictional nature of fintech, antimony laundering (“AML”) regulators must search for an international answer to maintain global financial stability and protect consumers against illicit activities. A variety of solutions have appeared within local AML regulatory frameworks. These frameworks tend to function as a hierarchy with three ordered objectives: market integrity, rule clarity, and innovation. However, frameworks often place too much emphasis on market integrity and …


The Segregation Of Markets, Christian Turner Feb 2020

The Segregation Of Markets, Christian Turner

Texas A&M Law Review

Campaign-finance reformers fear that rich donors’ money can be used disproportionately to influence the content of campaign advertising and thus, perhaps, the results of elections. In European football, UEFA has attempted to ban “financial doping”—rich owners’ use of money earned in sectors other than football to pay large sums for the best football players. Campaign-finance reform efforts and “financial fair play” rules in sport may seem like bespoke solutions to different problems. In fact, they are the same solution to the same problem. Both are attempts to ensure that power accumulated in one market is not brought into another market …


Treating Apples Like Oranges: The Benefits Of Exempting Community Banks From The Volcker Rule, Gregory Butz Mar 2019

Treating Apples Like Oranges: The Benefits Of Exempting Community Banks From The Volcker Rule, Gregory Butz

Texas A&M Law Review

In response to the Financial Crisis of 2008 and the Great Recession that followed, Congress passed the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Con- sumer Protection Act in 2010. The Volcker Rule is a controversial section of the Dodd–Frank Act that prohibits all banks, no matter their size, from pro- prietary trading and entering into certain relationships with private equity funds. But the Volcker Rule forces banks to incur significant costs to ensure compliance. While Big Banks have the capital and infrastructure to comply with the Volcker Rule, small Community Banks often do not. This gives Big Banks an unfair competitive …


Unintended Consequences, Loopholes, And Gibberish: Why There Are Still Securities Act Class Actions In State Courts, Brian Elzweig Jan 2019

Unintended Consequences, Loopholes, And Gibberish: Why There Are Still Securities Act Class Actions In State Courts, Brian Elzweig

Texas A&M Law Review

This Article examines Congress’s decades-long attempt to ensure that securities class action lawsuits of national importance are litigated in federal courts. The intent is limiting strike suits. Congress attempted to curtail strike suits through the enactment of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act (“PSLRA”). The PSLRA required heightened pleading requirements to ensure the validity of federal securities class actions. Instead of solving the dilemma, plaintiffs circumvented the PSLRA by bringing fraud cases as state law claims. To combat the circumvention of the PSLRA, Congress enacted the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act (“SLUSA”). SLUSA federally preempted state law claims based on …


The Eu’S Struggles With Collective Action For Securities Fraud: An American Perspective, Dan Morrissey Jan 2019

The Eu’S Struggles With Collective Action For Securities Fraud: An American Perspective, Dan Morrissey

Texas A&M Law Review

Notwithstanding the apparent exit of the United Kingdom, the European Union (“EU”) has grown in membership and power since its modest beginnings after World War II, now rivaling the U.S. in economic strength. With the goal of promoting the security and prosperity of all the citizens of the countries that belong to it, the EU is pressing ahead to adopt laws that will promote their political and financial integration. Along those lines, it has also recently acknowledged a deficiency in the legal systems of its member states when it comes to allowing collective actions for victims of various types of …


Could The Pay Ratio Disclosure Backfire? Examining The Effects Of The Sec's Pay Ratio Disclosure Rule, Jillian Loh Sep 2017

Could The Pay Ratio Disclosure Backfire? Examining The Effects Of The Sec's Pay Ratio Disclosure Rule, Jillian Loh

Texas A&M Law Review

At the signing of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (“Dodd-Frank Act”), President Barack Obama asserted that, “We all win when investors around the world have confidence in our markets. We all win when shareholders have more power and more information. . . . And we all win when folks are rewarded based on how well they perform, not how well they evade accountability.” After the financial crisis in 2008, the Obama Administration recognized the need to reconstruct the existing American financial regulatory system to ensure that a financial meltdown would never happen again. It …