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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

Phillips: Perspectives On Antitrust Policy, Edwin W. Tucker Nov 1965

Phillips: Perspectives On Antitrust Policy, Edwin W. Tucker

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Perspectives on Antitrust Policy edited by Almarin Phillips


Oppenheim: Unfair Trade Practices, Cases And Comments, Glen E. Weston Nov 1965

Oppenheim: Unfair Trade Practices, Cases And Comments, Glen E. Weston

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Unfair Trade Practices, Cases and Comments by S. Chesterfield Oppenheim


The Relativity Of Economic Evidence In Merger Cases-Emerging Decisions Force The Issue, Betty Bock Jun 1965

The Relativity Of Economic Evidence In Merger Cases-Emerging Decisions Force The Issue, Betty Bock

Michigan Law Review

The following discussion explores the interaction between law and economics as these two disciplines relate to the issues which arise under section 7 of the Clayton Act, as amended in 1950, and examines the correlative problems implicit in the working arrangements between lawyers and economists when they are asked to counsel an enforcement agency or an acquiring or acquired company concerning the potential competitive consequences of a merger.


Federal Law Held To Govern Effect Of The Release Of A Joint Tortfeasor In Private Antitrust Suit-Winchester Drive-In Theatre, Inc. V. Twentieth Century Fox Film Co., Michigan Law Review May 1965

Federal Law Held To Govern Effect Of The Release Of A Joint Tortfeasor In Private Antitrust Suit-Winchester Drive-In Theatre, Inc. V. Twentieth Century Fox Film Co., Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Private antitrust litigation occasionally raises the question of whether state or federal law should be applied to determine the effect of the release of a joint tortfeasor. When federal law is applied, as it was in Winchester Drive-In Theatre, Inc. v. Twentieth Century-Fox Film Co., there remains the necessity of formulating a rule of federal law, since there appears to be no established federal rule governing releases in antitrust suits.


The Antitrust Expediting Act- A Critical Reappraisal, Robert C. Bonges May 1965

The Antitrust Expediting Act- A Critical Reappraisal, Robert C. Bonges

Michigan Law Review

The Expediting Act has been subject to some rather severe criticism from the bench and bar. At the extreme, it has been suggested that the act be repealed and the procedure for appealing government civil antitrust cases be completely overhauled. Even proponents of the act have acknowledged its need of revision, but there is little agreement among them on the extent and nature of desirable change. This comment will explore the origins, development, and current role of the Expediting Act in order to help determine what course revision, if it is needed, should follow.


Territorial Trademark Rights And The Antitrust Laws, Richard F. Dole Jan 1965

Territorial Trademark Rights And The Antitrust Laws, Richard F. Dole

Michigan Legal Studies Series

Trademarks are devises used by business men to distinguish their goods from those of others. The utility of trademarks to purchasers lies in the identification of different lines of merchandise by different trademarks. On the other hand, perhaps the greatest advantage of trademarks to business derives from the connotations associated with marks by skillful advertising. Legal protection of trademark rights thus has a dual aspect: preventing others from copying marks both guards the identification function of trademarks and maintains exclusive rights in the commercial value of trademarks created by advertising. A Senate committee described the hybrid nature of trademark protection …


Tying Arrangement With Trademark As The Tying Item Is Not A Per Se Violation Of The Antitrust Laws-Susser V. Carvel Corp., Michigan Law Review Jan 1965

Tying Arrangement With Trademark As The Tying Item Is Not A Per Se Violation Of The Antitrust Laws-Susser V. Carvel Corp., Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Several independent franchised soft ice-cream outlets brought suit for treble damages against Carvel Corporation, the franchising company, alleging that the contract between them constituted an illegal tying arrangement in violation of section 3 of the Clayton Act and sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman Act. The contract bound the dealers to purchase from Carvel-appointed suppliers all commodities sold as part of the retail dairy composite. Plaintiffs stipulated that they would rely on per se violations at trial. The district court found that the plaintiffs had failed to show the alleged violations and, in any case, the defendant had proved …


Icc Conditions Merger Approval Upon Retention Of Jurisdiction To Allow Inclusion Of Additional Railroads In The Future, Michigan Law Review Jan 1965

Icc Conditions Merger Approval Upon Retention Of Jurisdiction To Allow Inclusion Of Additional Railroads In The Future, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

In two recent merger proceedings under section 5(2) of the Interstate Commerce Act, Seaboard Air Line R.R. - Merger-Atlantic Coast Line R.R. and Norfolk & W. Ry. and New York, C. & St. L. R.R.-Merger, the Interstate Commerce Commission imposed conditions" whereby it retained jurisdiction over the proceedings for five years to allow specified railroads to petition for inclusion in the new railway systems. Their inclusion would be ordered if found by the Commission, after a full hearing, to be consistent with the public interest.


A View From Labor, Theodore J. St. Antoine, N. Goldfinger Jan 1965

A View From Labor, Theodore J. St. Antoine, N. Goldfinger

Book Chapters

It will come as no surprise that our attitude, as union spokesmen, toward further extension of the antitrust laws over the activities of American labor organizations is much like the attitude of Calvin Coolidge's minister toward sin: we're against it. We feel our attitude is justified. But in contributing to a volume graced by so distinguished a company of scholars, it may be best that we do not confine ourselves merely to developing our own case in support of a conclusion which some might accuse us of having harbored all along.

We therefore shall take two different approaches. First, we …