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Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2016

Community College Leadership

American Samoa

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education

Molecular Diagnosis Of The Causal Agent Of The Root And Corm Rot Of Taro (Colocasia Esculenta) In The Aunu’U Island Of American Samoa, Nora Toalepai, Ndeme Atibalentja, Phd Aug 2016

Molecular Diagnosis Of The Causal Agent Of The Root And Corm Rot Of Taro (Colocasia Esculenta) In The Aunu’U Island Of American Samoa, Nora Toalepai, Ndeme Atibalentja, Phd

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice

Recently, taro (Colocasia esculenta) growers in Aunu’u have been complaining of a new disease characterized by the taro root and corm rot. Pythium spp. usually cause this type of disease. But, it was puzzling when the morphological features of the fungus isolated from diseased taros did not match those of Pythium. More sophisticated tools were needed. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques for identification of this pathogen.

Potato dextrose broth (PDB) was inoculated with five agar plugs cut from one week-old pure cultures of the pathogen grown on potato dextrose agar (PDA). After 10 days ...


Survey Of Virus Diseases Of Taro, Colocasia Esculenta, On The Aunu’U Island Of American Samoa, Darlene Meli, Ndeme Atibalentja, Phd Aug 2016

Survey Of Virus Diseases Of Taro, Colocasia Esculenta, On The Aunu’U Island Of American Samoa, Darlene Meli, Ndeme Atibalentja, Phd

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice

Taro, Colocasia esculenta, is the most important staple crop in American Samoa, especially in Aunu’u, a small (1.5 km2) island, approximately 2 km southeast of the main island of Tutuila. However, the sustainability of taro production is threatened by the occurrence of numerous diseases and pests, as evidenced by the leaf blight (Phytophthora colocasiae) epidemic that devastated the Samoan taro production in early 1990s. Crop losses due to viruses alone have been estimated at 20 - 60%. The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of virus diseases of taro in Aunu’u.

Overall, 112 leaf ...