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Full-Text Articles in Education

Supporting Home Language Reading Through Technology In Rural South Africa, Nathan M. Castillo, Daniel A. Wagner Mar 2018

Supporting Home Language Reading Through Technology In Rural South Africa, Nathan M. Castillo, Daniel A. Wagner

Journal Articles (Literacy.org)

This paper describes a short-term longitudinal study in South Africa, with children in grades 1-3, some of whom received a multimedia technology reading support program in one of three home languages and English (through exisiting computer labs in schools). Findings reveal a positive and significant impact on local language reading acquisition among children with multimedia support. The study shows that effective literacy support can help struggling rural learners make significant gains that will help them complete their schooling. The ability to accomplish a full cycle of primary school with fully developed reading skills has significant implications for life-long learning.


Diasporic Belonging: The Life-Worlds And Language Practices Of Muslim Youth From Marseille, Cécile Anne Marguerite Evers Jan 2016

Diasporic Belonging: The Life-Worlds And Language Practices Of Muslim Youth From Marseille, Cécile Anne Marguerite Evers

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Since the 1980s, when it became clear that immigrants from France’s ex-colonies were likely to settle with their families in France, the French have repeatedly questioned the cultural compatibility of Muslim immigrants and their descendants with French Republican values. Recent security concerns about Islamic terrorism in Western countries have reinflamed this debate about French Muslims’ “assimilability,” albeit with a novel focus on the cultural affiliations of French Muslim youth, in particular. The French State and politicians are concerned about survey data showing that, even as such youth have acceded to legal citizenship, they nevertheless exhibit a greater adherence to ...


Linguistic Capital, Information Access And Economic Opportunity Among Rural Young Adults In Western China*, Emily C. Hannum, Huayu Sebastian Cherng Jan 2014

Linguistic Capital, Information Access And Economic Opportunity Among Rural Young Adults In Western China*, Emily C. Hannum, Huayu Sebastian Cherng

Asia-Pacific Education, Language Minorities and Migration (ELMM) Network Working Paper Series

Facility with a country’s dominant language, a key form of linguistic capital, has a role to play in processes of social stratification and mobility, and this role is poorly understood. We have sought, in this paper, to explore access to this form of linguistic capital, and the implications of possessing linguistic capital, for a group of young adults who have been historically disadvantaged: rural young adults in western minority areas. Three main results emerge. First, there is a great deal of variability in linguistic capital, defined as standard Mandarin facility, across provinces and ethnic groups covered in the CHES ...


Teacher Identity In The Context Of Literacy Teaching: Three Explorations Of Classroom Positioning And Interaction In Secondary Schools, Leigh A. Hall, Amy Suzanne Johnson, Mary M. Juzwik, Stanton Wortham, Melissa Mosley May 2009

Teacher Identity In The Context Of Literacy Teaching: Three Explorations Of Classroom Positioning And Interaction In Secondary Schools, Leigh A. Hall, Amy Suzanne Johnson, Mary M. Juzwik, Stanton Wortham, Melissa Mosley

GSE Faculty Research

This article presents the results of three separate studies of literacy teaching and learning in the U.S. that explore the social functions of language, specifically focused on the identity development of literacy learners and teachers. Each study offers a detailed account of how literate identities are constructed and enacted and the positive and negative consequences that occur for teachers and students when they are enacted. Taken together, these three studies demonstrate how teachers’ and students’ understandings of identity can promote or inhibit literacy teaching and learning.