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Full-Text Articles in Education

Book Review: Reckonings: Numerals, Cognition, And History By Stephen Chrisomalis, Milton Rosa, Daniel Clark Orey Jan 2022

Book Review: Reckonings: Numerals, Cognition, And History By Stephen Chrisomalis, Milton Rosa, Daniel Clark Orey

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

This review of Reckonings shares our thoughts on the diverse insights presented by Stephen Chrisomalis’s version of the history of numerical notation. Chrisomalis suggests that members of distinct cultural groups write numbers as an active choice in accordance with their own sociocultural contexts, which reflect the influences of historical, cognitive, social, economic, political, environmental, and cultural factors. This book integrates comparative, cognitive, and evolutionary understandings on numerical cognition with historical and linguistic evidence on the use and transformation of numeral systems through the historical advancement of numeracy. Chrisomalis offers an interesting historical perspective on numbers that builds upon three main …


Beer And Brewing In German Culture: Bridging The Gaps Within Steam, John D. Sundquist Sep 2015

Beer And Brewing In German Culture: Bridging The Gaps Within Steam, John D. Sundquist

The STEAM Journal

A university-level course on science, history, and culture of beer and brewing offers students from a wide range of disciplines a unique opportunity to learn from each other. They gain an appreciation for STEAM and the interaction of a number of disciplines while examining a subject of growing interest. This paper provides a brief description of such a course and includes specific examples of ways in which students explore science, engineering, humanities and the arts, as these areas of research come together in the study of beer and brewing.


Steam With A Capital A: Learning Frenzy, David Rufo Mar 2013

Steam With A Capital A: Learning Frenzy, David Rufo

The STEAM Journal

A student dipped a brush into a bowl of viscous tempera paint and in a few quick strokes formed thick magenta letters on a large display board. Nearby a handful of students were working together to attach string to paper cups and balloons. Across the room a small group of girls were lying on the floor carefully adding multi-colored text to a poster. Two others created characters out of Popsicle sticks for a puppet show...This is how the integration of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, & Math (S.T.E.A.M.) happened with the fourth and fifth graders during the first few weeks of …


We Could All Be Having So Much More Fun! A Case For The History Of Mathematics In Education., Louise Anderton, David Wright Jan 2012

We Could All Be Having So Much More Fun! A Case For The History Of Mathematics In Education., Louise Anderton, David Wright

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Many students experience mathematics as ahistorical and acultural. We review the philosophical roots of this experience and pose alternatives. We argue that there is evidence that the inclusion of a historical dimension into the teaching of mathematics courses at all levels, combined with an ‘active’ approach to learning, will improve motivation and achievement.


Mothers And Non-Mothers: Gendering The Discourse Of Education In South Asia, Nita Kumar Jan 2007

Mothers And Non-Mothers: Gendering The Discourse Of Education In South Asia, Nita Kumar

CMC Faculty Publications and Research

This essay brings together and complicates three stories within South Asian education history by gendering them. Thus modern education was actively pursued by mothers for their sons; indigenous education should be understood as continuing at home; and women were crucial actors in men's reform and nationalism efforts through both collaboration and resistance. Gendered history should go beyond the separate story of girls and women, or the understanding of women as mothers and mothers as the nation, to see these three processes as gendered. The essay argues for the coming together of historical and anthropological arguments and for using literature imaginatively.