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Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2017

Educational Psychology

Utah State University

Stigma

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Psychological Inflexibility And Stigma: A Meta-Analytic Review, Jennifer Krafft, Jillian Ferrell, Michael E. Levin, Michael P. Twohig Nov 2017

Psychological Inflexibility And Stigma: A Meta-Analytic Review, Jennifer Krafft, Jillian Ferrell, Michael E. Levin, Michael P. Twohig

Psychology Faculty Publications

Stigma is known to have major impacts on the physical and psychological health of many groups. Psychological inflexibility is a psychological process that may help explain the impact of stigma on both self and others. Accordingly, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), which targets psychological inflexibility, has been researched as a potential treatment for stigma. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of these issues, this paper offers a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between psychological inflexibility and stigma, as well as a systematic review of ACT interventions for stigma. The results of the meta-analysis showed a positive, medium-to-large …


Self-Stigma And Weight Loss: The Impact Of Fear Of Being Stigmatized, Jason Lillis, J. G. Thomas, Michael E. Levin, R. R. Wing Oct 2017

Self-Stigma And Weight Loss: The Impact Of Fear Of Being Stigmatized, Jason Lillis, J. G. Thomas, Michael E. Levin, R. R. Wing

Psychology Faculty Publications

The current study sought to examine whether two facets of weight self-stigma (fear of enacted stigma and self-devaluation) were associated with weight change and treatment engagement for 188 individuals participating in a 3-month online weight loss program. Fear of enacted stigma predicted less weight loss 3-months later after controlling for demographics, eating problems, and psychological symptoms. Self-devaluation did not predict weight loss. Neither weight self-stigma variable predicted engagement in the online program. These results add to the literature indicating the negative effects of weight self-stigma while highlighting the central role of fear of being stigmatized by others in this process.