Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2017

Educational Psychology

Utah State University

Psychological flexibility

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Psychological Inflexibility And Stigma: A Meta-Analytic Review, Jennifer Krafft, Jillian Ferrell, Michael E. Levin, Michael P. Twohig Nov 2017

Psychological Inflexibility And Stigma: A Meta-Analytic Review, Jennifer Krafft, Jillian Ferrell, Michael E. Levin, Michael P. Twohig

Psychology Faculty Publications

Stigma is known to have major impacts on the physical and psychological health of many groups. Psychological inflexibility is a psychological process that may help explain the impact of stigma on both self and others. Accordingly, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), which targets psychological inflexibility, has been researched as a potential treatment for stigma. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of these issues, this paper offers a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between psychological inflexibility and stigma, as well as a systematic review of ACT interventions for stigma. The results of the meta-analysis showed a positive, medium-to-large …


Acceptance And Commitment Therapy As A Treatment For Anxiety And Depression: A Review., Michael P. Twohig, Michael E. Levin Jan 2017

Acceptance And Commitment Therapy As A Treatment For Anxiety And Depression: A Review., Michael P. Twohig, Michael E. Levin

Psychology Faculty Publications

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a modern form of cognitive behavioral therapy based on a distinct philosophy (functional contextualism) and basic science of cognition (relational frame theory). This article reviews the core features of ACT’s theoretical model of psychopathology and treatment as well as its therapeutic approach. It then provides a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating ACT for depression and anxiety disorders. Summarizing across a total of 36 RCTs, ACT appears to be more efficacious than waitlist conditions and treatment-as-usual, with largely equivalent effects relative to traditional cognitive behavioral therapy. Evidence from several trials also indicate …