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Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2015

Acceptance

joseph Ciarrochi

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Full-Text Articles in Education

Acceptance And Commitment Therapy (Act) For Psychological Adjustment After Traumatic Brain Injury: Reporting The Protocol For A Randomised Controlled Trial, Diane L. Whiting, Grahame K. Simpson, Hamish J. Mcleod, Frank P. Deane, Joseph Ciarrochi Jul 2015

Acceptance And Commitment Therapy (Act) For Psychological Adjustment After Traumatic Brain Injury: Reporting The Protocol For A Randomised Controlled Trial, Diane L. Whiting, Grahame K. Simpson, Hamish J. Mcleod, Frank P. Deane, Joseph Ciarrochi

joseph Ciarrochi

Following a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) there is a complex presentation of psychological symptoms which may impact on recovery. Validated treatments addressing these symptoms for this group of people are limited. This article reports on the protocol for a single-centre, two-armed, Phase II Randomised Control Trial (RCT) to address the adjustment process following a severe TBI. Participants will be recruited from Liverpool Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit and randomly allocated to one of two groups, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) or an active control (Befriending). The active treatment group utilises the six core processes of ACT with the intention of ...


Acceptance And Commitment Therapy (Act) For Improving The Lives Of Cancer Patients: A Preliminary Study, Danielle Feros, Lisbeth Lane, Joseph Ciarrochi, John Blackledge Jul 2015

Acceptance And Commitment Therapy (Act) For Improving The Lives Of Cancer Patients: A Preliminary Study, Danielle Feros, Lisbeth Lane, Joseph Ciarrochi, John Blackledge

joseph Ciarrochi

Background This preliminary study examined the effectiveness of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention at improving the quality of life among cancer patients. It was hypothesised that over the course of the intervention, patients would report increased psychological flexibility through acceptance of unpleasant thoughts and feelings, and that increased psychological flexibility would lead to improvements in distress, mood, and quality of life. Method Forty-five cancer patients participated in an ACT intervention. Outcome measures included self-reported distress, mood disturbance, psychological flexibility, and quality of life. Data were collected at pre, mid, and post-intervention and at 3-month follow-up. Results The data ...