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Articles 241 - 251 of 251

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec32-134 Sweet Clover Management, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1932

Ec32-134 Sweet Clover Management, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sweet clover has made a phenomenal growth in popularity and acreage during recent years. In Nebraska, the production increased from 30,000 acres in 1920 to 1,126,000 acres in 1930, an expansion of over one million acres in a 10-year period. Just a few years ago, when sweet clover was classified as a weed, it was the subject of proposed state legislation to prevent its production and spread. Today sweet clover has a recognized place among standard crops and in rotation systems. The acreage of sweet clover in Nebraska is now practically equal to that of alfalfa and ...


Rb32-266 Cooling Milk On Nebraska Farms, P.A. Downs, E.B. Lewis Jan 1932

Rb32-266 Cooling Milk On Nebraska Farms, P.A. Downs, E.B. Lewis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The desire of Nebraska people to continue the improvement of living conditions and to secure more healthful foods has been responsible for many changes in methods of caring for milk. One of the important factors in keeping milk sweet and of good quality is the process of cooling and keeping it cool until used. Three of these processes are as follows: placing containers of warm milk in any quantity of still water or still air at temperatures ranging from freezing to within a few degrees of the temperature of the milk, placing the containers in such positions that air or ...


Ec31-133 The Management Of Nebraska Soils (Revised March 1936), P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1931

Ec31-133 The Management Of Nebraska Soils (Revised March 1936), P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The agricultural lands of this country are its greatest natural resource. History points out that nations with vast areas of good farm land are most likely to prosper and survive over long periods of time. Local communities, too, prosper and flourish in proportion to the productiveness of the surrounding land. Schools, social life, and business develop best in areas where the land is productive and properly managed and conserved.

Nebraska, in common with other states, has suffered by the depletion of soil fertility. The reduction in acres in legumes and grasses, and the deplation of the organic matter in the ...


Rb30-244 Types Of Farming In Nebraska, Harold Hedges, F.E. Elliott Jan 1930

Rb30-244 Types Of Farming In Nebraska, Harold Hedges, F.E. Elliott

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

"Type of farming" as used in this bulletin is a term descriptive of a group of farms similar in size and enterprise combination. Thus a group of farms having the same kind, quantity, and proportion of crops oand livestock may be said to be following the same type of farming. The term "type-of-farming area" refers to an area within which there is a high degree of uniformity in the type of farming practicse and in the physical and economic conditions under which production takes place. This should not be understood to mean that there is absolute uniformity either in farming ...


Ec28-234 Nebraska System For Tattooing Hogs For Identification After Slaughter, G.R. Boomer, O.O. Waggener Jan 1928

Ec28-234 Nebraska System For Tattooing Hogs For Identification After Slaughter, G.R. Boomer, O.O. Waggener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A plan to identify the individual farm upon which hogs reaching markets are produced has been developed in connection with the efforts toward eradicating tuberculosis among farm animals. While primarily intended as a means of tracing back to determine sources of disease infection, the system of tattooing which is being developed has other significant possibilities. With the growing emphasis on quality products in the market, it is only fair that the producers of high quality commodities receive the premiums paid by processors and consumers. Health of farm animals is a quality factor. The producer of healthy hogs should be rewarded ...


Ec27-811 Harvesting Wheat In Nebraska With The Combined Harvester Thresher 1926, Arthur G. George Jan 1927

Ec27-811 Harvesting Wheat In Nebraska With The Combined Harvester Thresher 1926, Arthur G. George

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Frequent inquiry from wheat growers in Nebraska and others as to the relative merits of the combined harvester-thresher as an efficienct and economical harvesting machine led the Nebraska Agricultural College to make a study of this problem in the summer of 1926. The work was carried on by the Departments of Rural Economics and Agricultural Engineering, cooperating with the United States Department of Agriculture which was conducting a similar survey in different parts of the United States. Perkins county, Nebraska, was the area selected for study as it is more or less typical of those parts of the state where ...


Ec26-129 Profitable Wheawt Production, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1926

Ec26-129 Profitable Wheawt Production, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

More profitable wheat production, rather than greater total production in Nebraska, is the object of this circular. The grower who has the largest acreage of wheat does not necessarily make the greatest profit. High yields per acre usually means a lower cost and a great profit per bushel. Wheat of high quality brings additional profits. High yield and quality are usually the combined result of good seed, disease prevention, crop rotations, a well-prepared seed bed, the proper time of seeding, and reasonable care in harvesting, threshing and storing.


Ec24-721 Dairy Barns For Nebraska, Oscar W. Sjogren, Ivan D. Wood Jan 1924

Ec24-721 Dairy Barns For Nebraska, Oscar W. Sjogren, Ivan D. Wood

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The increasing interest shown among the farmers thruout this state in the betterment of dairy stock, and the tendency to give more attention to dairying on the farms, is bringing to the Agricultural College a great many requests for plans and suggestions for dairy barn construction. It is impossible to give every one of these inquiries individual attention to the extent of drawing a detailed plan to suit the conditions in each case. It is hoped therefore, that the material contained in this bulletin will offer helpful suggestions and answer many questions in the minds of prospective dairy men and ...


Ec23-122 Sweet Clover In Nebraska, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1923

Ec23-122 Sweet Clover In Nebraska, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sweet clover is adapted to practically all parts of Nebraska. It will grow under a wide range of soil and climatic conditions and is found growing wild in almost all sections of the state. It grows luxuriantly in eastern Nebraska and also does well in the western part of the state. Sweet clover will grow in regions of less rainfall than will red clover and, under certain conditions, it will do well where alfalfa is not easily grown.

This 1923 circular is largely based on questionnaire replies received from more than 200 farmers growing sweet clover in all parts of ...


Ec23-120 Wheat In Nebraska, W.W. Burr, P.H. Stewart Jan 1923

Ec23-120 Wheat In Nebraska, W.W. Burr, P.H. Stewart

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Wheat is one of the most important crops of the world. In total world tonnage it ranks third, being surpassed only by corn and potatoes. In th United States the tonnage is second only to corn, but wheat is far more important than corn as a human food.

Wheat is more important as a human food than any other rain crop. It is in itself almost a balanced food, and from earliest times has played an important part in the development of civilization. With the development of modern machinery wheat can now be produced without almost no hand work. On ...


Pb1908-27 Loss From Cornstalk Disease In Custer County, Nebraska, During The Winter Of 1906-1907 (Distributed January 1908, Reprinted December 1930), F.J. Alway, A.T. Peters Jan 1908

Pb1908-27 Loss From Cornstalk Disease In Custer County, Nebraska, During The Winter Of 1906-1907 (Distributed January 1908, Reprinted December 1930), F.J. Alway, A.T. Peters

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

"Cornstalk disease" is the name given to the cause or causes of death of cattle allowed to run in fields of standing cornstalks from which the ears have been gathered. It is probable that "many different maladies have been included under this name." In Nebraska, however, there is such a similarity in the symptoms reported by the farmers that it seems probable that the great majority of the losses attributed to cornstalk disease are really due to some common cause. As to the exact nature of this cause nothing is known. However, various theories have been advanced, and methods of ...