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Series

2005

William & Mary

School of Education Articles

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

A Typology Of Tools And Resources That Support Teachers' Learning Online, Judi Harris Feb 2005

A Typology Of Tools And Resources That Support Teachers' Learning Online, Judi Harris

School of Education Articles

More than one in every four public schools and two-thirds of all universities in the U.S. offer some sort of distance learning for teachers (Market Data Retrieval, 2004, p. 69). The most frequently cited type of online professional development is the online course, which is provided by schools, districts, regional centers, national organizations, universities, and independent consultants. Classroom Connect’s Connected University offerings for teachers are examples of this popular type of professional learning experience.


Is It Worth It? Deciding If Technology Is Worth The Time, Effort, And Money, Judi Harris Jan 2005

Is It Worth It? Deciding If Technology Is Worth The Time, Effort, And Money, Judi Harris

School of Education Articles

In this article I offer advice to help you decide which curriculum-based instructional activities to attempt to integrate into classrooms, with which students and when to do so. In making these practical suggestions, I am referring more to what is than what could be. Deciding which uses of education technologies are most worth the additional time, effort and expense doesn’t have to be guesswork. By weighing the learning outcome probabilities of new technology-based strategies against the success of existing pedagogical techniques we can decide, on a case-by-case basis, whether each new learning activity possibility is worth it.


Our Agenda For Technology Integration: It's Time To Choose, Judi Harris Jan 2005

Our Agenda For Technology Integration: It's Time To Choose, Judi Harris

School of Education Articles

One of two primary reasons why many—if not most—large-scale technology integration efforts are perceived to have failed is technocentrism and pedagogical dogmatism. In this editorial, I offer thoughts about each of these phenomena and invite you to respond.