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G73-46 Hessian Fly On Wheat, John E. Foster, Gary L. Hein Jan 1973

G73-46 Hessian Fly On Wheat, John E. Foster, Gary L. Hein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the life cycle, control and prevention of the Hessian fly. Plant-safe dates and resistant wheat varieties are also examined.

The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), is not native to the United States, but was probably introduced by Hessian soldiers during the Revolutionary War. This insect was given its common name by Americans because of its damage on Long Island in 1779. The pest has become distributed throughout the United States wheat production areas since then.

The Hessian fly belongs to the family of insects known as gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a group noted for their habit of ...


Ec72-1221 Arbor Day: A Nebraska Creation Jan 1972

Ec72-1221 Arbor Day: A Nebraska Creation

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Arbor Day, the Tree Planter's Holiday, started more than a century ago in Nebraska and is celebrated on the birthday of it's founder Julius Sterling Morton of Nebraska City. This extension circular talks about the history of Arbor Day and it's founder.


Rb58-186 The Existing Space In Nebraska Multistory Tee Houses, Virginia Y. Trotter Jan 1958

Rb58-186 The Existing Space In Nebraska Multistory Tee Houses, Virginia Y. Trotter

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In this manuscript, data are presented regarding the space and characteristics of multistory tee-shaped farmhouses. The tee house is shaped like the letter "t", one wing perpendicular to the main portion of the house in such a way that the main portion projects on each side.

The multistory tee house as found to be most prevalent in the areas of Nebraska included in this study. The sample comprised houses chosen by a method of random sampling. A personal interview was made at each farmhouse by a home economist and an agricultural engineer. Detailed measurements of the entire house and a ...


Rb160 Pink Rot Of Potatoes Caused By Phytophthora Erythroseptica Pethyb., R. W. Goss Jan 1949

Rb160 Pink Rot Of Potatoes Caused By Phytophthora Erythroseptica Pethyb., R. W. Goss

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During the summer of 1943 reports were received of rotted tubers occurring in fields of early potatoes in central Nebraska. The fact that the tuber rot was present at harvest time and was associated with the early death of the plants rather than occurring as a postharvest disease indicated the presence of a disease factor previously unreported in Nebraska.


Fifty Years' Achievement In Agricultural Investigation, R. T. Prescott Mar 1939

Fifty Years' Achievement In Agricultural Investigation, R. T. Prescott

Historical Circulars of the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station

In Nebraska, a hustling frontier state in 1887, the legislature hesitated not at all in taking advantage of the provisions of the Hatch Act, and now that fifty years have elapsed since the Station was founded, seventy-five years since the Land Grant College Act was passed and the U. S. Department of Agriculture established, and almost twenty-five years since the Agricultural Extension Service was added, it seems worth while to present a general summary of achievement within the state. The main object will be to show some of the important things that have been learned through the investigations of the ...


Ec38-118 Soil And Moisture Conservation In Nebraska, D.L. J. Gross, E.H. Doll Jan 1938

Ec38-118 Soil And Moisture Conservation In Nebraska, D.L. J. Gross, E.H. Doll

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When the white men first explored Nebraska, they found little erosion taking place. They found the hills, particularly in eastern Nebraska, covered with a dense growth of grass, underlain with a thick mat of decaying debris. The valleys were even more densely covered with the water-loving grasses and sedges. The soil underneath the prairie was black and spongy, the result of centuries of accumulating humus. The valleys bordering the streams were boggy and abounded with springs. Clear water flowed constantly in the streams. The upland draws in the more favorable parts of the state were heavily covered with the big ...


Ec38-118 Soil And Moisture Conservation In Nebraska, D.L. Gross, E.H. Doll Jan 1938

Ec38-118 Soil And Moisture Conservation In Nebraska, D.L. Gross, E.H. Doll

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When the white men first explored Nebraska, they found little erosion taking place. They found the hills, particularly in eastern Nebraska, covered with a dense growth of grass, underlain with a thick mat of decaying debris. The valleys were even more densely covered with the water-loving grasses and sedges. The soil underneath and prairie was black and soggy, the result of centuries of accumulating humus. The valleys bordernig the streams were boggy and abounded with springs. Clear water flowed constantly in the streams. The upland draws in the more favorable parts of the state were heavily covered with the big ...


Rb34-6 The Relation Of Drouth To Water-Use In Nebraska, G.E. Condra Jan 1934

Rb34-6 The Relation Of Drouth To Water-Use In Nebraska, G.E. Condra

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Three severe drouths have occurred in Nebraska and adjacent states within the past eighty years, and less severe ones have come at moderately regular intervals. Their influence on the agricultural development of the state is well known, but their relation to water supply in general is not so well understood.

This research bulletin is a brief review of the relation of drouth to soil moisture, surface water, and groundwater supplies.


Rb34-71 Effects Of Inflation And Deflation Upon Nebraska Agriculture, 1914 To 1932, H. Clyde Filley Jan 1934

Rb34-71 Effects Of Inflation And Deflation Upon Nebraska Agriculture, 1914 To 1932, H. Clyde Filley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska farmers prospered during the period which followed the depression of the nineties and preceded the beginning of the World War. To be sure the prosperity was not uniformly distributed either by years or by areas. The corn crop was unusually short in a large portion of the state in 1901 and an almost total failure in many of the southern counties in 1913. Chinch bugs did considerable injury in 1901 and the Hessian fly in 1905 and 1914. There was noticeable damage from insects in some areas in other years. No part of the state, however, suffered from long-continued ...


Ec33-136 Corn In Nebraska, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross, T.A. Kiesselbach Jan 1933

Ec33-136 Corn In Nebraska, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross, T.A. Kiesselbach

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Corn is Nebraska's most important crop. Of the nearly 19 million acres under cultivation in the state, over 10 million acres or more than 50 percent is normally planted to corn. This is three times the acreage of wheat, four times that of oats, and ten times that of barley. The 10-year average acre yield of corn for this state is 25.8 bushels compared with 26.9 bushels for the entire United States. Nebraska, with an average annual crop of approximately 258 million bushels, usually ranks third among all states in the total production of corn, being exceeded ...


Ec32-134 Sweet Clover Management, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1932

Ec32-134 Sweet Clover Management, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sweet clover has made a phenomenal growth in popularity and acreage during recent years. In Nebraska, the production increased from 30,000 acres in 1920 to 1,126,000 acres in 1930, an expansion of over one million acres in a 10-year period. Just a few years ago, when sweet clover was classified as a weed, it was the subject of proposed state legislation to prevent its production and spread. Today sweet clover has a recognized place among standard crops and in rotation systems. The acreage of sweet clover in Nebraska is now practically equal to that of alfalfa and ...


Ec32-713 The Trench Silo In Nebraska, Ivan D. Wood, E.B. Lewis Jan 1932

Ec32-713 The Trench Silo In Nebraska, Ivan D. Wood, E.B. Lewis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The original idea of using a trench for the storing of ensilage seems to have been the outgrowth of the practice long used in several European countries of storing clover and beet tops in pits. Shortly after the World War, western Canada followed by Montana and North Dakota began to use the trench silo. In Nebraska the true trench silo made its appearance about 1925 or 1926.

The trench silo as described in this circular, unless lined with some permanent material such as brick, concrete or stone, must be considered a temporary structure which will serve for a few years ...


Rb32-266 Cooling Milk On Nebraska Farms, P.A. Downs, E.B. Lewis Jan 1932

Rb32-266 Cooling Milk On Nebraska Farms, P.A. Downs, E.B. Lewis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The desire of Nebraska people to continue the improvement of living conditions and to secure more healthful foods has been responsible for many changes in methods of caring for milk. One of the important factors in keeping milk sweet and of good quality is the process of cooling and keeping it cool until used. Three of these processes are as follows: placing containers of warm milk in any quantity of still water or still air at temperatures ranging from freezing to within a few degrees of the temperature of the milk, placing the containers in such positions that air or ...


Ec31-133 The Management Of Nebraska Soils (Revised March 1936), P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1931

Ec31-133 The Management Of Nebraska Soils (Revised March 1936), P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The agricultural lands of this country are its greatest natural resource. History points out that nations with vast areas of good farm land are most likely to prosper and survive over long periods of time. Local communities, too, prosper and flourish in proportion to the productiveness of the surrounding land. Schools, social life, and business develop best in areas where the land is productive and properly managed and conserved.

Nebraska, in common with other states, has suffered by the depletion of soil fertility. The reduction in acres in legumes and grasses, and the deplation of the organic matter in the ...


Rb30-244 Types Of Farming In Nebraska, Harold Hedges, F.E. Elliott Jan 1930

Rb30-244 Types Of Farming In Nebraska, Harold Hedges, F.E. Elliott

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

"Type of farming" as used in this bulletin is a term descriptive of a group of farms similar in size and enterprise combination. Thus a group of farms having the same kind, quantity, and proportion of crops oand livestock may be said to be following the same type of farming. The term "type-of-farming area" refers to an area within which there is a high degree of uniformity in the type of farming practicse and in the physical and economic conditions under which production takes place. This should not be understood to mean that there is absolute uniformity either in farming ...


Ec28-234 Nebraska System For Tattooing Hogs For Identification After Slaughter, G.R. Boomer, O.O. Waggener Jan 1928

Ec28-234 Nebraska System For Tattooing Hogs For Identification After Slaughter, G.R. Boomer, O.O. Waggener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A plan to identify the individual farm upon which hogs reaching markets are produced has been developed in connection with the efforts toward eradicating tuberculosis among farm animals. While primarily intended as a means of tracing back to determine sources of disease infection, the system of tattooing which is being developed has other significant possibilities. With the growing emphasis on quality products in the market, it is only fair that the producers of high quality commodities receive the premiums paid by processors and consumers. Health of farm animals is a quality factor. The producer of healthy hogs should be rewarded ...


Ec27-811 Harvesting Wheat In Nebraska With The Combined Harvester Thresher 1926, Arthur G. George Jan 1927

Ec27-811 Harvesting Wheat In Nebraska With The Combined Harvester Thresher 1926, Arthur G. George

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Frequent inquiry from wheat growers in Nebraska and others as to the relative merits of the combined harvester-thresher as an efficienct and economical harvesting machine led the Nebraska Agricultural College to make a study of this problem in the summer of 1926. The work was carried on by the Departments of Rural Economics and Agricultural Engineering, cooperating with the United States Department of Agriculture which was conducting a similar survey in different parts of the United States. Perkins county, Nebraska, was the area selected for study as it is more or less typical of those parts of the state where ...


Ec26-129 Profitable Wheawt Production, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1926

Ec26-129 Profitable Wheawt Production, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

More profitable wheat production, rather than greater total production in Nebraska, is the object of this circular. The grower who has the largest acreage of wheat does not necessarily make the greatest profit. High yields per acre usually means a lower cost and a great profit per bushel. Wheat of high quality brings additional profits. High yield and quality are usually the combined result of good seed, disease prevention, crop rotations, a well-prepared seed bed, the proper time of seeding, and reasonable care in harvesting, threshing and storing.


Ec24-721 Dairy Barns For Nebraska, Oscar W. Sjogren, Ivan D. Wood Jan 1924

Ec24-721 Dairy Barns For Nebraska, Oscar W. Sjogren, Ivan D. Wood

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The increasing interest shown among the farmers thruout this state in the betterment of dairy stock, and the tendency to give more attention to dairying on the farms, is bringing to the Agricultural College a great many requests for plans and suggestions for dairy barn construction. It is impossible to give every one of these inquiries individual attention to the extent of drawing a detailed plan to suit the conditions in each case. It is hoped therefore, that the material contained in this bulletin will offer helpful suggestions and answer many questions in the minds of prospective dairy men and ...


Ec23-122 Sweet Clover In Nebraska, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1923

Ec23-122 Sweet Clover In Nebraska, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sweet clover is adapted to practically all parts of Nebraska. It will grow under a wide range of soil and climatic conditions and is found growing wild in almost all sections of the state. It grows luxuriantly in eastern Nebraska and also does well in the western part of the state. Sweet clover will grow in regions of less rainfall than will red clover and, under certain conditions, it will do well where alfalfa is not easily grown.

This 1923 circular is largely based on questionnaire replies received from more than 200 farmers growing sweet clover in all parts of ...


Ec23-120 Wheat In Nebraska, W.W. Burr, P.H. Stewart Jan 1923

Ec23-120 Wheat In Nebraska, W.W. Burr, P.H. Stewart

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Wheat is one of the most important crops of the world. In total world tonnage it ranks third, being surpassed only by corn and potatoes. In th United States the tonnage is second only to corn, but wheat is far more important than corn as a human food.

Wheat is more important as a human food than any other rain crop. It is in itself almost a balanced food, and from earliest times has played an important part in the development of civilization. With the development of modern machinery wheat can now be produced without almost no hand work. On ...


Pb1908-27 Loss From Cornstalk Disease In Custer County, Nebraska, During The Winter Of 1906-1907 (Distributed January 1908, Reprinted December 1930), F.J. Alway, A.T. Peters Jan 1908

Pb1908-27 Loss From Cornstalk Disease In Custer County, Nebraska, During The Winter Of 1906-1907 (Distributed January 1908, Reprinted December 1930), F.J. Alway, A.T. Peters

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

"Cornstalk disease" is the name given to the cause or causes of death of cattle allowed to run in fields of standing cornstalks from which the ears have been gathered. It is probable that "many different maladies have been included under this name." In Nebraska, however, there is such a similarity in the symptoms reported by the farmers that it seems probable that the great majority of the losses attributed to cornstalk disease are really due to some common cause. As to the exact nature of this cause nothing is known. However, various theories have been advanced, and methods of ...