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Series

Life Sciences

Nebraska

1994

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec94-1766 Windbreaks For Livestock Operations, James R. Brandle, Vernon Quam, Ladon Johnson, Bruce Wight Jan 1994

Ec94-1766 Windbreaks For Livestock Operations, James R. Brandle, Vernon Quam, Ladon Johnson, Bruce Wight

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks play an important role in the protection of livestock, particularly in young animals and in areas with cold northerly winds during the winter and early spring. Properly placed windbreaks can provide benefits to feedlots, livestock pastures, and calving areas. Reducing wind speed in winter lowers animal stress, improves animal health, and increases feeding efficiency. Livestock windbreaks provide significant amounts of wildlife habitat, protect the working environment in and around the livestock area, and screen noise and odors associated with livestock operations.

Specific needs of animals dictate that special attention be given to access, snow storage, and drainage when planning ...


G94-1231 Harvesting Corn And Sorghum For Silage, Rick Grant, Rick Stock Jan 1994

G94-1231 Harvesting Corn And Sorghum For Silage, Rick Grant, Rick Stock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication describes how to make high-quality corn and sorghum silage.

Quality Silage

Silage feeding quality is determined by 1) the nutrient content of the crop stored, 2) the stage of maturity and moisture content when harvested and 3) the effectiveness of silage preservation.


Ec94-107 Nebraska Proso, Safflower, Sunflower And Amaranth Variety Tests, 1994, David D. Baltensperger, Glen E. Frickel, Mark Swanson, Tom Holman, Robert N. Klein, James Krall, Randy Anderson Jan 1994

Ec94-107 Nebraska Proso, Safflower, Sunflower And Amaranth Variety Tests, 1994, David D. Baltensperger, Glen E. Frickel, Mark Swanson, Tom Holman, Robert N. Klein, James Krall, Randy Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of proso, sunflower, safflower and amaranth variety trials conducted by the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff, and the High Plains Agricultural Laboratory, Sidney. Conduct of the experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec94-1772 Windbreaks In Sustainable Agricultural Systems, James R. Brandle, Teresa Boes, Vernon Quam, John Gardner Jan 1994

Ec94-1772 Windbreaks In Sustainable Agricultural Systems, James R. Brandle, Teresa Boes, Vernon Quam, John Gardner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sustainable agriculture is a system of whole-farm resource use balanced with whole-farm productivity. The overall level of productivity achieved is dependent upon the ability to coordinate and manage simultaneously the soil, water, plant, and animal resources within climatic and economic limits. Both the kind and amount of plants and animals supported by the system are important and play significant roles, both individually and collectively in maintaining a healthy farm environment. In the future, integrated systems will help reduce human impact on resources while providing sufficient supplies of high quality food and fiber.

Windbreaks provide protection for people, animals, buildings, crops ...


G94-1195 Care Of Newly Planted Trees, David P. Mooter, Mark O. Harrell, Laurie J. Stepanek Jan 1994

G94-1195 Care Of Newly Planted Trees, David P. Mooter, Mark O. Harrell, Laurie J. Stepanek

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Mulching, pruning, watering, wrapping, staking, and fertilizing affect the growth and development of young trees. This NebGuide explains the proper practices of caring for newly planted trees.

Landscape trees provide beauty and utility. The care they receive during the first few years after planting is critical. This NebGuide discusses cultural practices that are recommended for young trees. Many recommendations have changed drastically in recent years in light of new and more thorough research.


G94-1205 Shattercane And Its Control, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin, Robert N. Klein Jan 1994

G94-1205 Shattercane And Its Control, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin, Robert N. Klein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Shattercane infestations may destroy a crop if not properly controlled. This NebGuide describes the characteristics of shattercane and discusses non-chemical, preemergence, herbicide incorporation and postemergence control.

Shattercane (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is a forage-type sorghum also known as black amber, chicken-corn, and wild cane. Infestations are most prevalent in Nebraska river valleys and tributaries, but are found in upland areas also.


Ec94-810 Increasing Racial And Ethnic Diversity Of Nebraska, John C. Allen, Jian Wu Jan 1994

Ec94-810 Increasing Racial And Ethnic Diversity Of Nebraska, John C. Allen, Jian Wu

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During the last decade, minority population in Nebraska increased rapidly while white population declined slightly. This increase was more rapid than was projected, but similar to the national trend.

This extension circular discusses the growth and decline of races in the state of Nebraska.


Ec94-135 Understanding Pesticides And Water Quality In Nebraska, Steven D. Comfort, Patrick J. Shea, Fred W. Roeth Jan 1994

Ec94-135 Understanding Pesticides And Water Quality In Nebraska, Steven D. Comfort, Patrick J. Shea, Fred W. Roeth

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Groundwater is Nebraska's most important natural resource. The principal source of groundwater in Nebraska is the High Plains Aquifer System. This system underlies approximately 85 percent of the state and supplies 95 percent of all groundwater used in Nebraska. The majority of groundwater in Nebraska is used by agriculture but domestic and commercial uses are also important. Eighty-two percent of Nebraskans use groundwater as their major source of drinking water, and nearly all of the state's farm homes rely on groundwater for their domestic needs.


G94-1210 Borers Of Shade Trees And Ornamental Plants, Frederick P. Baxendale, David L. Keith, J. Ackland Jones Jan 1994

G94-1210 Borers Of Shade Trees And Ornamental Plants, Frederick P. Baxendale, David L. Keith, J. Ackland Jones

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication describes the important shade tree and ornamental borers in Nebraska and discusses their management.

Nearly all shade trees are subject to borer attack. If damage is severe, young trees are likely to decline or die.