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Series

Life Sciences

Nebraska

1982

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec82-1738 Tree Planting Guide, William R. Lovett, Bruce E. Bolander Jan 1982

Ec82-1738 Tree Planting Guide, William R. Lovett, Bruce E. Bolander

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Site Preparation

Proper site preparation is essential to your tree planting operation, and varies with the different climates and soil types.

Chemical Control: On sandy soils, rough terrain, or other highly erodible sites, tillage is not recommended. Chemical weed and/or grass killers may be applied to the site in the fall or before planting in the spring.

Summer Fallow: This practice is recommended on heavy soil in western Nebraska to conserve soil moisture. This may be accomplished with the aid of occasional disking, subsurface tillage, or chemicals to control weeds.

Fall Tillage: In the eastern areas of the state ...


G82-587 Understanding Potassium For Crop Production In Nebraska, George W. Rehm Jan 1982

G82-587 Understanding Potassium For Crop Production In Nebraska, George W. Rehm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the availability of and the need for potassium in Nebraska soils

Potassium (K) is an essential nutrient absorbed from soils by crops in relatively large amounts. Therefore, it is classified as a major nutrient. Although large amounts are absorbed, potassium is not necessarily needed in a fertilizer program. Numerous studies conducted with all major crops have definitely shown that adding potassium to a fertilizer program does not lead to yield increases on the large majority of soils in Nebraska.


G82-602 Predicting The Last Irrigation For Corn, Grain Sorghum And Soybeans (Revised August 1991), Norman L. Klocke, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Terry L. Bockstadter Jan 1982

G82-602 Predicting The Last Irrigation For Corn, Grain Sorghum And Soybeans (Revised August 1991), Norman L. Klocke, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Terry L. Bockstadter

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide presents criteria and "rules of thumb" for predicting the last irrigation for corn, grain sorghum and soybeans.

Determining when to apply the last irrigation of the season is an important water management decision. One extra irrigation may mean wasting an additional one to three inches of water and two to five gallons of diesel fuel per acre. On the other hand, applying that one extra irrigation could mean several bushels per acre in crop yield.