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Series

Life Sciences

Nebraska

1981

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec81-1240 Vegetable Gardening In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1981

Ec81-1240 Vegetable Gardening In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are increasing their consumption of fresh vegetables — as appetizers, salads, side dishes, and snacks. Fresh vegetables are an integral part of a healthy, well-balanced diet. Although Nebraska's climate and soil are well-suited for many vegetables, most are supplied from out of the state, even during summer. Growing fresh vegetables can provide higher nutrition and flavor at less expense than buying fresh produce at the grocery store. A garden also can be a source of personal enjoyment and satisfaction.

This extension circular helps the gardener decide when, where, and how to plant and maintain a vegetable garden.


G81-563 Grazing Management Of Irrigated Grass Pastures, James T. Nichols Jan 1981

G81-563 Grazing Management Of Irrigated Grass Pastures, James T. Nichols

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses factors and principles of plant growth that influence irrigated pasture production; suggests management practices that allow irrigated pastures to express their production potential; and suggests stocking rates for various levels of production and classes of cattle.

Grazing management has a major impact on the production potential from irrigated pasture. Proper management practices can maximize pasture production -- poor management ultimately results in unacceptable production levels.