Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

Fixing Advising: A Model For Faculty Advising, Robert M. Crocker, Marlene Kahla, Charlotte Allen Jan 2014

Fixing Advising: A Model For Faculty Advising, Robert M. Crocker, Marlene Kahla, Charlotte Allen

Faculty Publications

This paper addresses mandates to fix the advising process with a focus on faculty advising systems. Measures of student success and satisfaction, administrative issues, and faculty concerns are among the many factors discussed. Regression analysis is used to explore long-voiced faculty complaints that students do not follow advice. A case study is used to illustrate changes in one department’s advising process and measures of student satisfaction are reported. A model of advising components is offered to illustrate practices suggested to realize the full potential of the advising process.


Can Universities Encourage Students Continued Motivation For Knowledge Sharing And How Can This Help Organizations?, Nikki Shoemaker Jan 2014

Can Universities Encourage Students Continued Motivation For Knowledge Sharing And How Can This Help Organizations?, Nikki Shoemaker

Faculty Publications

Both practitioners and researchers recognize the increasing importance of knowledge sharing in organizations (Bock, Zmud, Kim, & Lee, 2005; Vera-Muz, Ho, & Chow, 2006). Knowledge sharing influences a firm's knowledge creation, organizational learning, performance achievement, growth, and competitive advantage (Bartol & Srivastava, 2002; Bock & Kim, 2002; Vera-Muz et al., 2006). However, an individual's natural tendency is to hoard knowledge rather than to share knowledge (Davenport, 1997; Ruggles, 1998). So, how can knowledge sharing be encouraged?

Extrinsic rewards are believed to effectively motivate desired behaviors (Bartol & Locke, 2000). Under certain environmental conditions, extrinsic rewards are also believed to develop a more sustained motivation, called self-determined motivation, for these behaviors (Deci & Ryan, 1991). These ideas raise the following questions: (a) Do extrinsic rewards motivate students to share knowledge ...


Does The Classroom Delivery Method Make A Difference?, Esther Bunn, Mary Fischer, Treba Marsh Jan 2014

Does The Classroom Delivery Method Make A Difference?, Esther Bunn, Mary Fischer, Treba Marsh

Faculty Publications

This study seeks to determine if a difference exists in student performance and participation between an online and face-to-face Accounting Intermediate I class taught by the same professor. Even though students self-selected which course section to enroll, no significant difference was found to exist between the delivery method of the two courses based on the student's major field of study, gender, and whether or not they commuted to class. No significant difference is found between the assessments of the two class sections membership except the students' course performance. Contrary to prior research, the students enrolled in the online sections ...