Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Selected Works

Robert Fox

Families

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

A Community-Based Parenting Program With Low-Income Mothers Of Young Children, Bonnie Nicholson, Viktor Brenner, Robert A. Fox Nov 2012

A Community-Based Parenting Program With Low-Income Mothers Of Young Children, Bonnie Nicholson, Viktor Brenner, Robert A. Fox

Robert Fox

Research has established a significant relationship between certain parental characteristics. such as income or parenting practices, and the development of child behavior problems. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a parenting program for low-income parents of children one to five years old which was offered through community-based family resource centers. Seventy-one mothers completed the program and showed significant decreases in their use of verbal and corporal punishment and significant increases in nurturing behaviors: their children’s behavior also improved significantly. Forty-five percent of parents also met Jacobson and Truax’s (1991) criteria for clinically significant change. Implications for practitioners working ...


One Family At A Time: A Prevention Program For At-Risk Parents, Bonnie Nicholson, Michelle Anderson, Robert A. Fox, Viktor Brenner Nov 2012

One Family At A Time: A Prevention Program For At-Risk Parents, Bonnie Nicholson, Michelle Anderson, Robert A. Fox, Viktor Brenner

Robert Fox

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a psychoeducational parenting program with at-risk parents of young children. At-risk was defined as excessive parental use of verbal and corporal punishment combined with low-income status. All families were seen for 10 weeks, either individually or in very small groups. Results showed that compared with the control group, parents participating in the program significantly decreased their levels of verbal and corporal punishment, anger, stress, and reported child behavior problems; results were maintained at follow-up. Implications for counselors are provided.