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Full-Text Articles in Education

Promoting Scholarship And Faculty Development Through Faculty Learning Communities, Olive J. Yonge Dr., Sandra J. Davidson Oct 2017

Promoting Scholarship And Faculty Development Through Faculty Learning Communities, Olive J. Yonge Dr., Sandra J. Davidson

Quality Advancement in Nursing Education - Avancées en formation infirmière

Faculty learning communities (FLCs), whether they are topic or cohort-based, are a form of professional development that promote scholarship and collegiality among faculty members. This article describes how a number of FLCs were initiated in a Faculty of Nursing (FoN). Members who participated described the FLCs as scholarly, creative and morale enhancing. One of the most significant impacts in the topic-based FLCs was having members create a scholarly product such as articles, letters, theatrical performances, books, faculty modules, briefs and paintings. For the cohort-based FLC the product was preparing pre tenure faculty for tenure. It is recommended FLCs be voluntary ...


Reflection On Retention: An Evaluation Study On Minority Students’ Success In An Online Nursing Program, Amanda Hawkins, Elizabeth Frander, Melissa Young, Kaylen Deal Aug 2017

Reflection On Retention: An Evaluation Study On Minority Students’ Success In An Online Nursing Program, Amanda Hawkins, Elizabeth Frander, Melissa Young, Kaylen Deal

Perspectives In Learning

The United States nursing workforce faces a health care challenge for providing culturally competent care to the growing number of racial and ethnic minority groups. According to Gertner et al (2010), cultural competency in health care is defined as providing care to patients with diverse backgrounds to meet the social, cultural and linguistic needs. Research has shown that patients receive a higher level of culturally competent care from nurses who are from their own cultural background. Administrators and faculty working in Schools of Nursing must recognize this important fact and take action to ensure the admissions, progression, and graduation of ...


Pilot Test Of Communication With A ‘Rapid Fire’ Technique, Desiree A. Díaz, Candace Pettigrew, Christine Dileone, Meredith Dodge, Deborah Shelton May 2017

Pilot Test Of Communication With A ‘Rapid Fire’ Technique, Desiree A. Díaz, Candace Pettigrew, Christine Dileone, Meredith Dodge, Deborah Shelton

Journal for Evidence-based Practice in Correctional Health

Abstract

An innovative communication training technique, ‘Rapid Fire’, was created to enhance communication and was incorporated into the debrief component of a simulation designed for correctional nurses to promote learning and engagement. The term ‘Rapid Fire’ was used to expose the critical time element that appears in the first five minutes of many crisis situations, where a quick relay of information and problem solving is essential; such as in a cardiac arrest or other rapidly deteriorating patient situations. This technique consists of a five-minute session prior to the structured debrief. During the ‘Rapid Fire’ portion of the debrief, all learners ...


Return To Nursing: A Meta-Synthesis Of Academic Bridging Programs’ Effect On Internationally Educated Nurses, Edward V. Cruz, Rhea Faye Felicilda-Reynaldo, C. Patricia Mazzotta Apr 2017

Return To Nursing: A Meta-Synthesis Of Academic Bridging Programs’ Effect On Internationally Educated Nurses, Edward V. Cruz, Rhea Faye Felicilda-Reynaldo, C. Patricia Mazzotta

The Qualitative Report

This meta-synthesis explored the effect of bridging programs on internationally educated nurses (IENs). Eight papers that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review. There were 437 participants from eight studies who come from different parts of the globe and who settled in either Australia, Canada, New Zealand, or the United Kingdom. Using a grounded theory approach for data analysis, four effects of bridging programs on IENs were identified. These are: (a) the concepts from the regulatory body, the client-centred care; (b) do something better for us, for our future; (c) we have to learn English; and, (d) faculty ...


Exploring Self-Efficacy And Anxiety In First-Year Nursing Students Enrolled In A Discipline-Specific Scholarly Writing Course, Kim M. Mitchell, Tom Harrigan, Torrie Stefansson, Holly Setlack Apr 2017

Exploring Self-Efficacy And Anxiety In First-Year Nursing Students Enrolled In A Discipline-Specific Scholarly Writing Course, Kim M. Mitchell, Tom Harrigan, Torrie Stefansson, Holly Setlack

Quality Advancement in Nursing Education - Avancées en formation infirmière

Background: Very few studies measuring writing self-efficacy or anxiety in undergraduate nursing students exist in the education literature. The purpose of the present investigation was to identify if changes to writing self-efficacy and writing anxiety will occur in first-year baccalaureate nursing students who are exposed to a discipline-specific scholarly writing course employing scaffolding strategies as the primary instructional method. Concurrently, this study was the pilot test for a new measure assessing writing self-efficacy, The Self-Efficacy Scale for Academic Writing.

Method: A one-group pre-test/posttest design was employed. Sixty-four (64) paired questionnaires were available for analysis. Bandura’s self-efficacy theory and ...


Generation Y Health Professional Students’ Preferred Teaching And Learning Approaches: A Systematic Review, Caroline Mary Hills, Tracy Levett-Jones, Samuel Lapkin, Helen Warren-Forward Jan 2017

Generation Y Health Professional Students’ Preferred Teaching And Learning Approaches: A Systematic Review, Caroline Mary Hills, Tracy Levett-Jones, Samuel Lapkin, Helen Warren-Forward

The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy

Generation Y or Millennials are descriptors for those born between 1982 and 2000. This cohort has grown up in the digital age and is purported to have different learning preferences from previous generations. Students are important stakeholders in identifying their preferred teaching and learning approaches in health professional programs. This study aimed to identify, appraise, and synthesize the best available evidence regarding the teaching and learning preferences of Generation Y health professional students. The review considered any objectively measured or self-reported outcomes of teaching and learning reported from Generation Y health professional student perspectives. In accordance with a previously published ...