Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences

1991

Stock market

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Education

G91-1059 Point-And-Figure Analysis, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1059 Point-And-Figure Analysis, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is the ninth and final NebGuide providing an overview for producers using technical analysis in marketing decisions. It covers point-and-figure analysis.

The point-and-figure chart is one kind of chart commonly used by people tracking prices in the futures market.

To construct this type of chart you need graph paper, a pencil, price information, and a little time to learn the technique. Charting services also offer point-and-figure charts for a fee.


G91-1057 Elements Of Technical Analysis, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1057 Elements Of Technical Analysis, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This seventh in a series of nine NebGuides on technical analysis in marketing centers on daily volume and open interest.

Volume and open interest are used to substantiate primary signals developed by technical analysis. They help investors find clues to market movement and bolster the chances of enhancing their financial position.

In the futures market, a new contract becomes a reality only when a new buyer and a new seller complete a transaction.


G91-1055 Using Moving Averages To Effectively Analyze Trends, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1055 Using Moving Averages To Effectively Analyze Trends, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This fifth of a nine NebGuide series is designed to show how trend lines can assist producers and others in analyzing the market's technical side.

What is the objective in using moving averages?

Technical analysts construct a moving average of price to provide a better market timing indicator than the traditional straight-line method. The idea is to smooth out daily price fluctuation to get a clear view of the market trend. The moving average is a method for averaging near-term prices in relation to long-term prices. This technique should not be confused with the oscillators described in NebGuide No. 8 …


G91-1054 How To Study Gaps In The Technical Side Of Marketing, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1054 How To Study Gaps In The Technical Side Of Marketing, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is the fourth of nine NebGuides laying the foundation for producers who want to study the technical side of market analysis.

Anyone studying technicals or markets is continually looking for trends, ways to measure market movement, and support and resistance areas. Many market analysts say the market "wants to fill a gap." Producers need to understand what this statement means, starting with a definition of the term "gap."

A gap in the market is formed when the trading range (high, low) operates outside the previous day's trading range. This occurs in highly volatile markets, not in slow moving sideways …


G91-1056 Support And Resistance Areas, And Will The Market Give Us A Second Chance?, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1056 Support And Resistance Areas, And Will The Market Give Us A Second Chance?, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is the sixth of nine NebGuides designed to aid producers in starting to use technical analysis in their marketing plan.

Among the most frustrating aspects of marketing are missed opportunities for good prices. These occur because producers becoming overly optimistic. This optimism stems from the belief that a bull market will keep going up.

Ultimately, the market does change direction -- it does so many times before the producer has priced his crop. This NebGuide examines where to draw additional support and resistance lines beyond the support and resistance trend lines explained in the second NebGuide in this series. …


G91-1051 Charting The Markets (Introduction And Bar Charts), Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1051 Charting The Markets (Introduction And Bar Charts), Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide focuses on the basics of the bar chart as it depicts market trends on a continuing basis.

This is the first in a series of nine NebGuides dealing with different technical aspects of a market. The series is designed to give producers an opportunity to explore the basics of charting as a marketing approach, and to allow individuals to determine if they are interested in learning more about it.

These marketing NebGuides also are designed as a handy reference packet to aid in understanding what radio announcers and commodity brokers are saying about movements of the market.


G91-1052 Determining Market Trends, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1052 Determining Market Trends, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is the second of nine NebGuides discussing basics of technical market analysis and benefits of following market trends to aid decision-making.

Most livestock and crop producers are not "day traders" -- participants in the market on a daily basis -- nor should they be. A typical producer may enter the market only a few times in a marketing year, or only once, as when selling the crop at harvest.

Because producers are not day traders, market trends are one of the most valuable tools, or indicators, that can be obtained from correctly executed charts.