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Life Sciences

1991

Extension circular

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec91-2503 Management Of Fabric Pests, Shripat T. Kamble Jan 1991

Ec91-2503 Management Of Fabric Pests, Shripat T. Kamble

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The common fabric destroying insects in Nebraska are clothes moths, carpet beetles, and silverfish. Clothes moths and carpet beetles feed on and digest wool, leather, cotton, silk, and synthetic fibers. They generally infest clothes, carpets, rugs, upholstery, etc. Silverfish feed principally on paper products, glue, paste, wallpaper, starch, and any food products consumed by humans. They also damage clothing, cotton, linen, rayon and ramie fabrics.

This extension circular explains these insects and the proper ways of eliminating them in your household.


Ec91-1773 Deer Damage Control In Nebraska, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Bill Baxter Jan 1991

Ec91-1773 Deer Damage Control In Nebraska, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Bill Baxter

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are fortunate to have two species of deer in the state — the white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). They are beautiful and fascinating animals that provide many aesthetic and recreational benefits. They can however, cause problems when they damage agricultural crops, trees and backyard plantings.

This extension circular covers the methods of reducing deer damage through herd management (legal harvest, shooting permits, and live removal), deer fencing, repellents, and scare devices.


Ec91-735 The Impact Of Nitrogen And Irrigation Management And Vadose Zone Conditions On Ground Water Contamination By Nitrate-Nitrogen, K.D. Frank, Darrell Watts, Andrew Christiansen, Edwin Penas Jan 1991

Ec91-735 The Impact Of Nitrogen And Irrigation Management And Vadose Zone Conditions On Ground Water Contamination By Nitrate-Nitrogen, K.D. Frank, Darrell Watts, Andrew Christiansen, Edwin Penas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The single largest contaminant found in ground water samples taken throughout Nebraska is nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate-N). Much of it reaches the ground water as a "non-point source" contaminant leached out of the crop root zone.

Nitrate-N is essential to corn production. However, when leached from the crop root zone it can become a major source of ground water contamination. There are serious contamination problems in shallow aquifers beneath several river valleys in Nebraska. Increasing nitrate-N concentrations are beginning to appear in deeper aquifer.


Ec91-136 Managing Deficient Soybean Stands, Gary E. Pepper, David B. Willmot Jan 1991

Ec91-136 Managing Deficient Soybean Stands, Gary E. Pepper, David B. Willmot

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Soybean producers whose crops suffer poor stand emergencemay wonder whether or not replanting presents a viable economic alternative. Sometimes growers elect to replant deficient stands, but doing so can add considerable expense to their operations through the costs for seed, tillage operations, and perhaps even herbicides. The grower's economic risk is compounded by the possible loss in potential yield due to late seeding, which eventually leads to a reduction in net profit. Making the decision to either replant or stick with a somewhat deficient field is difficult.

The information in this circular is intended to help growers decide which course …


Ec91-269 Domestic Poultry Feed Formulation Guide, Earl W. Gleaves, Thomas W. Sullivan, F. John Struwe Jan 1991

Ec91-269 Domestic Poultry Feed Formulation Guide, Earl W. Gleaves, Thomas W. Sullivan, F. John Struwe

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication provides basic, practical information about nturition and diet requirements for poultry. Nutrient requirements, diet formulations, feed ingredient analyses, and feeding methods are ever changing. Feed cost is the largest single item of expense in producing poultry meat or eggs. Poultry producers should adopt a comprehensive feeding program based on sound nutrition principles tailored to a specific production purpose. This publication provides the basis for such a feeding program.