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Life Sciences

1991

Dairy

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

G91-1034 Evaluating The Feeding Value Of Fibrous Feeds For Dairy Cattle, Rick J. Grant Jan 1991

G91-1034 Evaluating The Feeding Value Of Fibrous Feeds For Dairy Cattle, Rick J. Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes what makes fiber unique as a nutrient, how it's measured, and the impact different dietary fiber levels have on milk production and feed intake.

Fiber content of feed or forage affects its feeding value. Understanding fiber and how it is used is necessary to properly feed dairy cows. Each of the following topics will be addressed to better understand fiber nutrition in the dairy cow:

1. What is fiber?

2. How will too little or too much fiber in the diet affect the cow's metabolism and subsequent production?

3. What are optimal levels of fiber in the …


G91-1047 Acidosis, Rick Stock, Robert Britton Jan 1991

G91-1047 Acidosis, Rick Stock, Robert Britton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses why acidosis occurs, its economic considerations, and methods to prevent and treat acidosis.

Acidosis is the most important nutritional disorder in feedlots today. Caused by a rapid production and absorption of acids from the rumen when cattle consume too much starch (primarily grain) or sugar in a short period of time, acidosis causes cattle to be stressed. As long as cattle are finished on grain, cows are grazed on cornstalk fields (grain consumption) or high energy (grain) diets are fed to dairy cows, acidosis will be an important problem.

Cattle evolved digesting roughages that ferment slowly in …


G91-1027 Protein And Carbohydrate Nutrition Of High Producing Dairy Cows, Rick J. Grant Jan 1991

G91-1027 Protein And Carbohydrate Nutrition Of High Producing Dairy Cows, Rick J. Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the protein and carbohydrate requirements for milk production by dairy cows, and feeding guidelines to meet those requirements.

Crude protein makes up 14 to 19 percent, and carbohydrates 65 to 75 percent of the total ration dry matter in common dairy cow diets. As milk production per cow increases above 19,000 to 20,000 pounds per year, understanding how these nutrients are used by the dairy cow for milk production allows the formulation of diets that optimize solids-corrected milk production.


G91-1041 Feeding The Bovine Somatotropin (Bst) Treated Dairy Cow, Rick J. Grant, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1991

G91-1041 Feeding The Bovine Somatotropin (Bst) Treated Dairy Cow, Rick J. Grant, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Proper feeding management of dairy cows treated with bovine somatotropin is emphasized.

When dairy producers decide to use bovine somatotropin (BST) in their herds, proper nutritional management is critical to its success.

The final decision to use BST is likely an economic one: will the use of BST in a producer's operation generate a positive cash flow?


G91-1048 Average Composition Of Feeds Used In Nebraska, Rick Stock, Rick Grant, Terry Klopfenstein Jan 1991

G91-1048 Average Composition Of Feeds Used In Nebraska, Rick Stock, Rick Grant, Terry Klopfenstein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Analyses of frequently used feedstuffs are shown on a dry matter basis in the following table. Because the moisture content of feedstuffs varies widely, formulating rations on a dry basis contributes to accuracay in feeding cattle, compared to formulating on "as-fed" analyses.


G91-1032 Dairy Cow Health And Metabolic Disease Relative To Nutritional Factors, Duane N. Rice, Rick Stock Jan 1991

G91-1032 Dairy Cow Health And Metabolic Disease Relative To Nutritional Factors, Duane N. Rice, Rick Stock

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the various implications and effects of dairy cow metabolic problems, their causes, and management recommendations for prevention.

Nutritional imbalances, deficiencies, or erratic management of feeding programs for dairy cows can create large numbers and various types of health problems generally categorized as metabolic diseases.

Compounding the problem are the ever-changing nutritional needs of the cow, her lactation/dry period needs, feed quality changes, and producer personal management practices.