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Full-Text Articles in History

Popular Culture In The American History Classroom: Using Television, Film, And Popular Music As Primary Source Documents, Mary Kay Maslanka Dec 2007

Popular Culture In The American History Classroom: Using Television, Film, And Popular Music As Primary Source Documents, Mary Kay Maslanka

Education and Human Development Master's Theses

Teaching American history in the high school classroom is more than reviewing events and memorizing dates and facts, more than a preparatory course for high school students to take high-stakes tests that evaluate what they have learned. It is more than a chance to hone lifelong critical thinking skills for the young citizens who attend. Today’s educators struggle to compromise these two expectations; one that stresses student preparation as well-informed, critical-thinking citizens, and the other that emphasizes success on standardized tests. In order to be successful in both areas of significance, the study of primary sources has become a ...


Distress During The Great Depression: The Illiquidity-Insolvency Debate Revisited, Gary Richardson Sep 2007

Distress During The Great Depression: The Illiquidity-Insolvency Debate Revisited, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

During the contraction from 1929 to 1933, the Federal Reserve System tracked changes in the status of all banks operating in the United States and determined the cause of each bank suspension. This essay analyzes chronological patterns in aggregate series constructed from that data. The analysis demonstrates both illiquidity and insolvency were substantial sources of bank distress. Periods of heightened distress were correlated with periods of increased illiquidity. Contagion via correspondent networks and bank runs propagated the initial banking panics. As the depression deepened and asset values declined, insolvency loomed as the principal threat to depository institutions.


Deposit Insurance And Moral Hazard: Capital, Risk, Malfeasance, And Mismanagement. A Comment On ‘Deposit Insurance And Moral Hazard: Evidence From Texas Banking During The 1920s, Gary Richardson Aug 2007

Deposit Insurance And Moral Hazard: Capital, Risk, Malfeasance, And Mismanagement. A Comment On ‘Deposit Insurance And Moral Hazard: Evidence From Texas Banking During The 1920s, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

A Journal of Economic History article by Linda Hooks and Kenneth Robinson, “Deposit Insurance and Moral Hazard: Evidence from Texas Banking During the 1920s,” contains a contradiction (Hooks and Robinson 2002). Pondering the contradiction in the paper reveals insights that the authors may have overlooked. Hooks and Robinson’s article examines the experience of the banking industry in Texas during the 1920s. Texas operated a deposit-insurance system from January 1, 1910 until February 11, 1927. Deposit insurance was mandatory for all state banks, which were given the choice of two plans in which to participate. The preponderance participated in the ...


Check Is In The Mail: Correspondent Clearing And The Banking Panics Of The Great Depression, Gary Richardson Aug 2007

Check Is In The Mail: Correspondent Clearing And The Banking Panics Of The Great Depression, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

Weaknesses within the check-clearing system played a hitherto unrecognized role in the banking crises of the Great Depression. Correspondent check-clearing networks were vulnerable to counter-party cascades. Accounting conventions that overstated reserves available to corresponding institutions may have exacerbated the situation. The initial banking panic began when a correspondent network centered in Nashville collapsed, forcing over 100 institutions to suspend operations. As the contraction continued, additional correspondent systems imploded. The vulnerability of correspondent networks is one reason that banks that cleared via correspondents failed at higher rates than other institutions during the Great Depression.


White Man's Burden?" The Party Politics Of American Imperialism: 1900-1920, Joven Carandang Jan 2007

White Man's Burden?" The Party Politics Of American Imperialism: 1900-1920, Joven Carandang

Electronic Theses and Dissertations, 2004-2019

This dissertation is an interpretive analysis of the political background of the American annexation and administration of the Philippine Islands between 1900 and 1920. It seeks to analyze the political value of supporting and opposing imperialism to American political parties and elites. Seeking to capitalize on the American victory over Spain in 1898, the Republican Party embraced the annexation of the Philippines as a way to promote an idea of rising American international power. Subsequently, their tenure in the Philippines can be analyzed as bringing industrialization to the Philippines for political gain, casting themselves in a politically popular role of ...


"One Touch Of Nature Makes The Whole World Kin": The Transnational Lives Of Deaf Americans, 1870-1924, Joseph John Murray Jan 2007

"One Touch Of Nature Makes The Whole World Kin": The Transnational Lives Of Deaf Americans, 1870-1924, Joseph John Murray

Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation studies the transnational interactions of Deaf Americans in a transnational Deaf public sphere from 1870-1924. Deaf Americans advanced a discourse of co-equality in which they asserted their ability to participate in society as Deaf-- and as deaf-- people.