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Full-Text Articles in History

Review Of Fur, Fortune, And Empire: The Epic History Of The Fur Trade In America, Claiborne A. Skinner Jr. Feb 2015

Review Of Fur, Fortune, And Empire: The Epic History Of The Fur Trade In America, Claiborne A. Skinner Jr.

Claiborne A. Skinner Jr.

Eric J. Dolin’s Fur, Fortune, and Empire is a concise, engaging, and remarkably comprehensive survey of the American fur trade. Though aimed at a general readership, the author presents a broad-ranging, sophisticated story of the commerce, supported by nearly a hundred pages of citations. The author says that the inspiration for the book came from a passage in James Truslow Adams’s The Founding of New England: “The Bible and the Beaver were the two mainstays of the Plymouth Colony in its early years.” He knew something about Pilgrims and something about the fur trade, but nothing of the ...


Thinking About Elites In The Early Republic, Andrew M. Schocket Aug 2014

Thinking About Elites In The Early Republic, Andrew M. Schocket

Andrew M Schocket

This essay is a conceptual exploration designed not only to provoke further consideration and discussion of how we might better analyze elites, but also, by extension, to offer a framework for investigating class and class differences in the early years of America’s nationhood.


"Rembering The Tradition." Review Of Brion Mcclanahan And Clyde Wilson’S Forgotten Conservatives In American History (Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican, 2012)., Allen P. Mendenhall Dec 2013

"Rembering The Tradition." Review Of Brion Mcclanahan And Clyde Wilson’S Forgotten Conservatives In American History (Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican, 2012)., Allen P. Mendenhall

Allen Mendenhall

Review of Brion McClanahan and Clyde Wilson’s Forgotten Conservatives in American History (Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican, 2012).


Patrick Henry’S “Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death,” A National Call To Arms, David C. Taylor Jr Feb 2013

Patrick Henry’S “Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death,” A National Call To Arms, David C. Taylor Jr

David C Taylor Jr

On March 23 1775, Patrick Henry gave a speech that resounded through the American Colonies as a call to arms against the oppressive British. His cry to Virginians was to no longer let the tyranny of the British Monarchy reign over them. He did not wish to have war, but war seemed to be the only viable option to get the results he so desperately desired.


Intensified Regulatory Scrutiny And Bank Distress In New York City During The Great Depression,” With Patrick Van Horn, Gary Richardson May 2009

Intensified Regulatory Scrutiny And Bank Distress In New York City During The Great Depression,” With Patrick Van Horn, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

Bank distress peaked in New York City, at the center of the United States money market, in July and August 1931, when the banking crisis peaked in Germany and before Britain abandoned the gold standard. This article tests competing theories about the causes of New York’s banking crisis. The cause appears to have been intensified regulatory scrutiny, which was a delayed reaction to the failure of the Bank of United States, rather than the exposure of money center banks to events overseas.


Through Adversity, It Became Strong: The Establishment Of The Oss, The Opposition It Faced, And Its Overall Success, Olivia Blessing Dec 2008

Through Adversity, It Became Strong: The Establishment Of The Oss, The Opposition It Faced, And Its Overall Success, Olivia Blessing

Olivia L Blessing

Fulfillment of the United States’ need for intelligence research and analysis during World War II came through William Donovan’s leadership of the Coordinator of Information (COI) and its offspring, the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), despite the early problems both agencies faced. Donovan and the OSS would later play a major part in the Allies’ victory over Axis forces. By overcoming the bureaucratic and procedural issues at home and abroad, The Office of Strategic Services firmly established itself as a necessary force in the world of information during the war against the Axis.


Quarterly Data On The Categories And Causes Of Bank Distress During The Great Depression, Gary Richardson Dec 2007

Quarterly Data On The Categories And Causes Of Bank Distress During The Great Depression, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

No abstract provided.


Distress During The Great Depression: The Illiquidity-Insolvency Debate Revisited, Gary Richardson Sep 2007

Distress During The Great Depression: The Illiquidity-Insolvency Debate Revisited, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

During the contraction from 1929 to 1933, the Federal Reserve System tracked changes in the status of all banks operating in the United States and determined the cause of each bank suspension. This essay analyzes chronological patterns in aggregate series constructed from that data. The analysis demonstrates both illiquidity and insolvency were substantial sources of bank distress. Periods of heightened distress were correlated with periods of increased illiquidity. Contagion via correspondent networks and bank runs propagated the initial banking panics. As the depression deepened and asset values declined, insolvency loomed as the principal threat to depository institutions.


Deposit Insurance And Moral Hazard: Capital, Risk, Malfeasance, And Mismanagement. A Comment On ‘Deposit Insurance And Moral Hazard: Evidence From Texas Banking During The 1920s, Gary Richardson Aug 2007

Deposit Insurance And Moral Hazard: Capital, Risk, Malfeasance, And Mismanagement. A Comment On ‘Deposit Insurance And Moral Hazard: Evidence From Texas Banking During The 1920s, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

A Journal of Economic History article by Linda Hooks and Kenneth Robinson, “Deposit Insurance and Moral Hazard: Evidence from Texas Banking During the 1920s,” contains a contradiction (Hooks and Robinson 2002). Pondering the contradiction in the paper reveals insights that the authors may have overlooked. Hooks and Robinson’s article examines the experience of the banking industry in Texas during the 1920s. Texas operated a deposit-insurance system from January 1, 1910 until February 11, 1927. Deposit insurance was mandatory for all state banks, which were given the choice of two plans in which to participate. The preponderance participated in the ...


Check Is In The Mail: Correspondent Clearing And The Banking Panics Of The Great Depression, Gary Richardson Aug 2007

Check Is In The Mail: Correspondent Clearing And The Banking Panics Of The Great Depression, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

Weaknesses within the check-clearing system played a hitherto unrecognized role in the banking crises of the Great Depression. Correspondent check-clearing networks were vulnerable to counter-party cascades. Accounting conventions that overstated reserves available to corresponding institutions may have exacerbated the situation. The initial banking panic began when a correspondent network centered in Nashville collapsed, forcing over 100 institutions to suspend operations. As the contraction continued, additional correspondent systems imploded. The vulnerability of correspondent networks is one reason that banks that cleared via correspondents failed at higher rates than other institutions during the Great Depression.