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Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

2018

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Zone-Decorated Pots At The Hatch Site (44pg51): A Late Woodland Manifestation Of An Ancient Tradition, Douglas Makin Oct 2018

Zone-Decorated Pots At The Hatch Site (44pg51): A Late Woodland Manifestation Of An Ancient Tradition, Douglas Makin

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Excavated in the 1970s and 80s by Lefty Gregory, the Hatch site is arguably among the most significant precolonial archaeology sites in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Though the collection sat in storage for decades, it recently became accessible to researchers. The thorough excavation combined with abundant radiocarbon data allow the historical narrative of this magnificent site to come into focus. an unusual place, hidden in a remote location, the Hatch site witnessed at least 600 years of regularly occurring ritualized gatherings. These gatherings involved the sacrifice and internment of dogs as well as elaborate feasts on both estuarine and terrestrial ...


Ancestral Landscapes: A Study Of Historical Black Cemeteries And Contemporary Practices Of Commemoration Among African Americans In Duval County, Jacksonville, Fl., Brittany Brown Oct 2018

Ancestral Landscapes: A Study Of Historical Black Cemeteries And Contemporary Practices Of Commemoration Among African Americans In Duval County, Jacksonville, Fl., Brittany Brown

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

The end of slavery in North America presented an opportunity for African Americans in Jacksonville, Florida to reinvent themselves. The reconstruction era brought about new social, political, and economic opportunities for African Americans living in Jacksonville. Despite the failure of Reconstruction and the implementation of Jim Crow, Jacksonville gave birth to a vibrant African American aristocracy. Jacksonville's Black elite comprised of doctors, lawyers, morticians, religious leaders, business people and other professionals. Jacksonville's Black elite thrived in the early half of the twentieth century, many of them used their knowledge and skills to contribute to the social and economic ...


“God Sends Meat And The Devil Sends Cooks”: Meat Usage And Cuisine In Eighteenth-Century English Colonial America, Dessa Elizabeth Lightfoot Apr 2018

“God Sends Meat And The Devil Sends Cooks”: Meat Usage And Cuisine In Eighteenth-Century English Colonial America, Dessa Elizabeth Lightfoot

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

American cuisines did not develop in isolation, but instead were influenced by a constant flow of information, individuals, and material culture between the colonies and the rest of the Atlantic world. These, in turn, interacted with the specific agricultural, social, and economic conditions and goals of residents in each colony. Food was a powerful symbol of identity in the English world in the eighteenth century, and printed English cookery books were widely available. What colonists ate, however, also reflected what was locally available, and resources could vary significantly between colonies. Meat usage is one aspect of cuisine that is directly ...


On The Margins Of Empire: An Archaeological And Historical Study Of Guana Island, British Virgin Islands, Mark Kostro Apr 2018

On The Margins Of Empire: An Archaeological And Historical Study Of Guana Island, British Virgin Islands, Mark Kostro

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

The present study of Guana Island in the British Virgin Islands draws upon archaeological, archival, and architectural evidence to examine the material and spatial aspects of everyday life on the social, geographic, and economic margins of the British Empire between 1717 and 1845. Guana’s settlers were yeoman farmers, formerly indentured laborers, and fishermen displaced from other parts of the Caribbean who came to the Virgin Islands for the opportunity to seek their own fortunes in the small island territories initially forsaken by sugar planters as ill-suited for large scale sugar cultivation. Arriving with them, and with increasing frequency over ...


Vengeance With Mercy: Changing Traditions And Traditional Practices Of Colonial Yamasees, Patrick Johnson Apr 2018

Vengeance With Mercy: Changing Traditions And Traditional Practices Of Colonial Yamasees, Patrick Johnson

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This dissertation argues that colonial Yamasee communities moved hundreds of miles throughout the present-day Southeastern United States, often to gain influence, and maintained traditions such as names they more closely associated with their ethnicity and authority than ceramics. Self-identification by Yamasees in censuses, speeches, and letters for a century and archaeological evidence from multiple towns allows me to analyze multiple expressions of their identity. their rich rhetoric demonstrates the mechanics of authority—they dictated terms to Europeans and other Native Americans by balancing between, in their words, vengeance and mercy. I focus on a letter and tattoo from a warrior ...


On The Table And Under It: Social Negotiation & Drinking Spaces In Frontier Resource Extraction Communities, Megan Rhodes Victor Feb 2018

On The Table And Under It: Social Negotiation & Drinking Spaces In Frontier Resource Extraction Communities, Megan Rhodes Victor

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Current research on frontiers describe these spaces as zones of meeting, interaction, dynamism, and change. Further, the geographic, ecological, economic, and political processes that are inherent within these locales shape them, rendering them far from static. These current scholars of frontier theory have sought to fight the image of frontier spaces as locations needing civilization, which is how they used to be approached. They have also stressed the presence of frontier locales outside of the United States, which was the focus of Frederick Jackson Turner's seminal work. Leonard Thompson and Howard Lamar, two prominent figures in the New West ...


Buried Beneath The River City: Investigating An Archaeological Landscape And Its Community Value In Richmond, Virginia, Ellen Luisa Chapman Feb 2018

Buried Beneath The River City: Investigating An Archaeological Landscape And Its Community Value In Richmond, Virginia, Ellen Luisa Chapman

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Richmond, Virginia, located along the fall line of the James River, was an important political boundary during prehistory; was established as an English colonial town in 1737; and was a center of the interstate slave trade and the capitol of the Confederacy during the nineteenth century. Although Richmond holds a prominent place in the narrative of American and Virginia history, the city’s archaeological resources have received incredibly little attention or preservation advocacy. However, in the wake of a 2013 proposal to construct a baseball stadium in the heart of the city’s slave trading district, archaeological sensitivity and vulnerability ...