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I Found Something In The Woods Somewhere: Narrative, Heterotemporality, And The Timber Industry In The Great Smoky Mountains, Elizabeth Albee Jan 2020

I Found Something In The Woods Somewhere: Narrative, Heterotemporality, And The Timber Industry In The Great Smoky Mountains, Elizabeth Albee

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park has been prized as an area of unmatched biodiversity in the Eastern United States. However, the presentation of the Park as an unpeopled, pristine wilderness does not acknowledge that the Park is a heterogeneous space where nature and culture are entangled. Recognizing and remembering the region’s cultural history is vital to understanding the Smoky Mountains in the past and present. The archaeology of the 20th-century timber industry is largely forgotten within the context of the National Park today, though the industry and its associated artifacts contradict popular myths about Appalachia. In 2019, I ...


“The Dutch Found Us And Relieved Us…” Identifying Seventeenth Century Illicit Dutch Trade Relations On Virginia’S Eastern Shore And In The Chesapeake, Haley Marie Hoffman Jan 2020

“The Dutch Found Us And Relieved Us…” Identifying Seventeenth Century Illicit Dutch Trade Relations On Virginia’S Eastern Shore And In The Chesapeake, Haley Marie Hoffman

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This study explores how illicit transatlantic trade relations with the Dutch in seventeenth-century Virginia can be identified through the material record. The research was motivated by recent excavations at a seventeenth-century plantation on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. Eyreville, as it is now known, was a hub of transatlantic trade during the formative years of the Virginia colony. The recognizable presence of Dutch trade goods, coupled with the site’s pro-Dutch merchant residents, prompted the investigation into material signatures of illicit trade on the Eastern Shore and the Chesapeake. The identification of these material signatures is based on extensive research into ...


His Majesty's Ship Saphire And The Royal Navy In 17th-Century Newfoundland, Erika Elizabeth Laanela Jan 2019

His Majesty's Ship Saphire And The Royal Navy In 17th-Century Newfoundland, Erika Elizabeth Laanela

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

The English fifth-rate frigate Saphire was set on fire by its commander in Newfoundland during an attack by a French squadron in September 1696. Prior to its untimely sinking, this small warship had served the Royal Navy for over two decades, primarily in the Mediterranean, acting as convoy and escort to English shipping. This study combines multiple lines of evidence, including archaeology and material culture recovered from the wreck and contemporary documents, art, and illustrations, to explore the significance of the Saphire through a series of multi-scalar and diachronic interpretive lenses. The approach is inspired by an analytical framework for ...


Zone-Decorated Pots At The Hatch Site (44pg51): A Late Woodland Manifestation Of An Ancient Tradition, Douglas Makin Oct 2018

Zone-Decorated Pots At The Hatch Site (44pg51): A Late Woodland Manifestation Of An Ancient Tradition, Douglas Makin

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Excavated in the 1970s and 80s by Lefty Gregory, the Hatch site is arguably among the most significant precolonial archaeology sites in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Though the collection sat in storage for decades, it recently became accessible to researchers. The thorough excavation combined with abundant radiocarbon data allow the historical narrative of this magnificent site to come into focus. an unusual place, hidden in a remote location, the Hatch site witnessed at least 600 years of regularly occurring ritualized gatherings. These gatherings involved the sacrifice and internment of dogs as well as elaborate feasts on both estuarine and terrestrial ...


Ancestral Landscapes: A Study Of Historical Black Cemeteries And Contemporary Practices Of Commemoration Among African Americans In Duval County, Jacksonville, Fl., Brittany Brown Oct 2018

Ancestral Landscapes: A Study Of Historical Black Cemeteries And Contemporary Practices Of Commemoration Among African Americans In Duval County, Jacksonville, Fl., Brittany Brown

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

The end of slavery in North America presented an opportunity for African Americans in Jacksonville, Florida to reinvent themselves. The reconstruction era brought about new social, political, and economic opportunities for African Americans living in Jacksonville. Despite the failure of Reconstruction and the implementation of Jim Crow, Jacksonville gave birth to a vibrant African American aristocracy. Jacksonville's Black elite comprised of doctors, lawyers, morticians, religious leaders, business people and other professionals. Jacksonville's Black elite thrived in the early half of the twentieth century, many of them used their knowledge and skills to contribute to the social and economic ...


“God Sends Meat And The Devil Sends Cooks”: Meat Usage And Cuisine In Eighteenth-Century English Colonial America, Dessa Elizabeth Lightfoot Apr 2018

“God Sends Meat And The Devil Sends Cooks”: Meat Usage And Cuisine In Eighteenth-Century English Colonial America, Dessa Elizabeth Lightfoot

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

American cuisines did not develop in isolation, but instead were influenced by a constant flow of information, individuals, and material culture between the colonies and the rest of the Atlantic world. These, in turn, interacted with the specific agricultural, social, and economic conditions and goals of residents in each colony. Food was a powerful symbol of identity in the English world in the eighteenth century, and printed English cookery books were widely available. What colonists ate, however, also reflected what was locally available, and resources could vary significantly between colonies. Meat usage is one aspect of cuisine that is directly ...


On The Margins Of Empire: An Archaeological And Historical Study Of Guana Island, British Virgin Islands, Mark Kostro Apr 2018

On The Margins Of Empire: An Archaeological And Historical Study Of Guana Island, British Virgin Islands, Mark Kostro

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

The present study of Guana Island in the British Virgin Islands draws upon archaeological, archival, and architectural evidence to examine the material and spatial aspects of everyday life on the social, geographic, and economic margins of the British Empire between 1717 and 1845. Guana’s settlers were yeoman farmers, formerly indentured laborers, and fishermen displaced from other parts of the Caribbean who came to the Virgin Islands for the opportunity to seek their own fortunes in the small island territories initially forsaken by sugar planters as ill-suited for large scale sugar cultivation. Arriving with them, and with increasing frequency over ...


Vengeance With Mercy: Changing Traditions And Traditional Practices Of Colonial Yamasees, Patrick Johnson Apr 2018

Vengeance With Mercy: Changing Traditions And Traditional Practices Of Colonial Yamasees, Patrick Johnson

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This dissertation argues that colonial Yamasee communities moved hundreds of miles throughout the present-day Southeastern United States, often to gain influence, and maintained traditions such as names they more closely associated with their ethnicity and authority than ceramics. Self-identification by Yamasees in censuses, speeches, and letters for a century and archaeological evidence from multiple towns allows me to analyze multiple expressions of their identity. their rich rhetoric demonstrates the mechanics of authority—they dictated terms to Europeans and other Native Americans by balancing between, in their words, vengeance and mercy. I focus on a letter and tattoo from a warrior ...


On The Table And Under It: Social Negotiation & Drinking Spaces In Frontier Resource Extraction Communities, Megan Rhodes Victor Feb 2018

On The Table And Under It: Social Negotiation & Drinking Spaces In Frontier Resource Extraction Communities, Megan Rhodes Victor

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Current research on frontiers describe these spaces as zones of meeting, interaction, dynamism, and change. Further, the geographic, ecological, economic, and political processes that are inherent within these locales shape them, rendering them far from static. These current scholars of frontier theory have sought to fight the image of frontier spaces as locations needing civilization, which is how they used to be approached. They have also stressed the presence of frontier locales outside of the United States, which was the focus of Frederick Jackson Turner's seminal work. Leonard Thompson and Howard Lamar, two prominent figures in the New West ...


Buried Beneath The River City: Investigating An Archaeological Landscape And Its Community Value In Richmond, Virginia, Ellen Luisa Chapman Feb 2018

Buried Beneath The River City: Investigating An Archaeological Landscape And Its Community Value In Richmond, Virginia, Ellen Luisa Chapman

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Richmond, Virginia, located along the fall line of the James River, was an important political boundary during prehistory; was established as an English colonial town in 1737; and was a center of the interstate slave trade and the capitol of the Confederacy during the nineteenth century. Although Richmond holds a prominent place in the narrative of American and Virginia history, the city’s archaeological resources have received incredibly little attention or preservation advocacy. However, in the wake of a 2013 proposal to construct a baseball stadium in the heart of the city’s slave trading district, archaeological sensitivity and vulnerability ...


The Octagon House And Mount Airy: Exploring The Intersection Of Slavery, Social Values, And Architecture In 19th-Century Washington, Dc And Virginia, Julianna Geralynn Jackson Jun 2017

The Octagon House And Mount Airy: Exploring The Intersection Of Slavery, Social Values, And Architecture In 19th-Century Washington, Dc And Virginia, Julianna Geralynn Jackson

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This project uses archaeology, architecture, and the documentary record to explore the ways in which one family, the Tayloes, used Georgian design principals as a way of exerting control over the 19th-century landscape. This project uses two Tayloe homes as the units of study and investigates architectural choices at the Octagon House in Washington, DC, juxtaposed with its Richmond County, Virginia counterpart, Mount Airy, to examine architectural features and contexts of slavery on the landscape. Archaeological site reports, building plans, city maps, and various historic documents are used to identify contexts of slavery and explore the relationship between slavery, social ...


Creating The Border: Defining, Enforcing And Reasserting Physical And Ethnic Borderzone Spaces During The 16th, 17th And 18th Centuries In The Lake Champlain Richelieu River Valley, Andrew Robert Beaupre Jun 2017

Creating The Border: Defining, Enforcing And Reasserting Physical And Ethnic Borderzone Spaces During The 16th, 17th And 18th Centuries In The Lake Champlain Richelieu River Valley, Andrew Robert Beaupre

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This dissertation examines the creation of space and place in a border region through a historically grounded, multi-scalar approach to spatiality. The work draws upon the pre- and post-contact archaeology of the Lake Champlain Richelieu River Corridor, a historically contested waterway where the states of Vermont, and New York meet the Canadian Province of Québec. This is a region that has played host to countless complex cultural interactions between Native American/First Nation groups and Europeans of various cultural and national identities A tripartite model for multi-scalar study of space and place creation is presented and applied to the political ...


The Land Remembers: The Construction Of Movement Possibility Among Woodland Period Communities Of The Virginia Peninsula, Josue Roberto Nieves Jan 2015

The Land Remembers: The Construction Of Movement Possibility Among Woodland Period Communities Of The Virginia Peninsula, Josue Roberto Nieves

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Artful Manipulation: The Rockefeller Family And Cold War America, Julia Kaziewicz Jan 2015

Artful Manipulation: The Rockefeller Family And Cold War America, Julia Kaziewicz

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

My dissertation, "Artful Manipulation: The Rockefeller Family and Cold War America," examines how the Rockefeller family used the Museum of Modern Art, Colonial Williamsburg, and the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection to shape opinions about America, both at home and abroad, during the early years of the Cold War. The work done at Colonial Williamsburg tied the Rockefeller name to the foundations of American society and, later, to the spread of global democracy in the Cold War world. The establishment of a new museum for the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art collection in 1957 renewed the narrative that American ...


From Path To Portage: Issues Of Scales, Process, And Pattern In Understanding New Brunswick Riverine Trail, Mallory Leigh Moran Jan 2015

From Path To Portage: Issues Of Scales, Process, And Pattern In Understanding New Brunswick Riverine Trail, Mallory Leigh Moran

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Canary Red: Preserving Cochineal And Contrasting Colonial Histories On Lanzarote, Sarah Mattes Jan 2015

Canary Red: Preserving Cochineal And Contrasting Colonial Histories On Lanzarote, Sarah Mattes

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Could You Point Me To Your Nearest Clay Source, Please?: A Xrf Study Of Barbadian Historic Era Ceramics, Benjamin Crossley Kirby Jan 2015

Could You Point Me To Your Nearest Clay Source, Please?: A Xrf Study Of Barbadian Historic Era Ceramics, Benjamin Crossley Kirby

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Grandfathers At War: Practical Politics Of Identity At Delaware Town, Melissa Ann Eaton Jan 2014

Grandfathers At War: Practical Politics Of Identity At Delaware Town, Melissa Ann Eaton

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This research explores the meaning, construction, representation, and function of Delaware ethnic identity during the 1820s. In 1821, nearly 2,000 Delawares (self-referentially called Lenape) crossed the Mississippi River and settled in Southwest Missouri as a condition of the Treaty of St. Marys. This dissertation argues that effects of this emigration sparked a vigorous reconsideration of ethnic identity and cultural representation. Traditionally, other Eastern Algonquian groups recognized Delawares by the metaphoric kinship status of "grandfather." Both European and Colonial governments also established Delawares as preferential clients and trading partners. Yet, as the Delawares immigrated into a new "western" Superintendency of ...


Ruins Reframed: The Commodification Of American Urban Disaster, 1861-1906, Zachary Michael Hilpert Jan 2014

Ruins Reframed: The Commodification Of American Urban Disaster, 1861-1906, Zachary Michael Hilpert

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This dissertation explores images of urban disaster and related events produced from the Civil War to the dawn of the 20th century, seeking to understand the role such visual media played in the formation of American identity and racial perceptions. Images of disasters that appeared throughout this period demonstrate a desire on the part of a largely white, native-born consumer class to share in a collective grieving process, one that initially recalled the comforts found in the communal suffering of the Civil War, but habitually eschewed the most tragic elements in favor of an optimistic, nationalistic narrative free of lasting ...


Behind The Scenes At William And Mary: Front Stage History And Backstage Archaeology, Tiffany Olivia Little Jan 2014

Behind The Scenes At William And Mary: Front Stage History And Backstage Archaeology, Tiffany Olivia Little

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


The Fruits Of Their Labors: Exploring William Hamilton's Greenhouse Complex And The Rise Of American Botany In Early Federal Philadelphia, Sarah Jane Chesney Jan 2014

The Fruits Of Their Labors: Exploring William Hamilton's Greenhouse Complex And The Rise Of American Botany In Early Federal Philadelphia, Sarah Jane Chesney

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This dissertation explores the world of early American botany and the transatlantic community of botanical enthusiasts from the perspective of William Hamilton, gentleman botanical collector in late eighteenth and early nineteenth century Philadelphia. Drawing on both existing documentary sources and three seasons of archaeological excavation at The Woodlands, Hamilton's country estate on the west bank of the Schuylkill River, I analyze both the physical requirements of botanical collecting as well as the more nuanced social, cultural, and economic elements of this trade and its early modern participants.;The personal experiences of individual participants in this exchange are often traced ...


An Enslaved Landscape: The Virginia Plantation At The End Of The Seventeenth Century, David Arthur Brown Jan 2014

An Enslaved Landscape: The Virginia Plantation At The End Of The Seventeenth Century, David Arthur Brown

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Lewis Burwell II designed Fairfield plantation in Gloucester County to be the most sophisticated and successful architectural and agricultural effort in late seventeenth-century Virginia. He envisioned a physical framework with the intent to control the world around him so that he might profit from growing tobacco, while raising his family's status to the highest in the colony through the display of wealth and knowledge and the enslavement of both Africans and the natural surroundings. The landscape he envisioned contrasted with those of the enslaved Africans he purchased and put to work in the fields and buildings surrounding his '1694 ...


Gathering Places, Cultivating Spaces: An Archaeology Of A Chesapeake Neighborhood Through Enslavement And Emancipation, 1775--1905, Jon Jason Boroughs Jan 2013

Gathering Places, Cultivating Spaces: An Archaeology Of A Chesapeake Neighborhood Through Enslavement And Emancipation, 1775--1905, Jon Jason Boroughs

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This study is a community-level analysis of an African American plantation neighborhood grounded in archaeological excavations at the Quarterpath Site (44WB0124), an antebellum quartering complex and post-Emancipation tenant residence occupied circa 1840s-1905 in lower James City County, Virginia. It asserts that the Quarterpath domestic quarter was a gathering place, a locus of social interaction in a vibrant and long established Chesapeake plantation neighborhood complex.;By the antebellum period, as marriage "abroad," or off-plantation, became the most common form of long term social union within plantation communities, enslaved social and kin ties in the Chesapeake region were typically geographically dispersed, enjoining ...


Peripheral Vision: Mimesis And Materiality Along The James River, Virginia, 1619-1660, Kathryn Lee Mcclure Sikes Jan 2013

Peripheral Vision: Mimesis And Materiality Along The James River, Virginia, 1619-1660, Kathryn Lee Mcclure Sikes

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Applying the concepts of mimesis and "third space" to Virginia's early colonial settlements, this study presents a comparative examination of documentary, pictorial, cartographic, and material evidence surrounding City Point's Site 44PG102 and contemporary James River plantations. By considering archaeological site data that are possibly contemporaneous, but previously have been segregated by archaeologists into "prehistoric" (Native Virginian) and "historic" (European) categories, I investigate the evidence for interethnic interactions as well as the social conventions surrounding 17th-century object and landscape use. This thesis argues that people of European, West Central African, West African, and Algonquian-speaking Native Virginian backgrounds endowed shared ...


From Kaolin To Claymount: Landscapes Of The 19th-Century James River Stoneware Industry, Oliver Maximilian Mueller-Heubach Jan 2013

From Kaolin To Claymount: Landscapes Of The 19th-Century James River Stoneware Industry, Oliver Maximilian Mueller-Heubach

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This dissertation will examine the James River stoneware tradition, which encompasses parts of Henrico, Dinwiddie, Prince George, and Charles City Counties, south and east of the Falls of the James at Richmond, Virginia. This area has one of the richest histories in American ceramics. The essential elements of stoneware production will be examined. This dissertation will provide the only comprehensive overview of this regional industry with in depth descriptions of the relevant potteries, potting families and their environment. Detailed description of ceramic forms and decorations specific to individual potters will be provided. The archaeological research done at the potting sites ...


Dooley's Ferry: The Archaeology Of A Civilian Community In Wartime, Carl Gilbert Drexler Jan 2013

Dooley's Ferry: The Archaeology Of A Civilian Community In Wartime, Carl Gilbert Drexler

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Warfare and conflict are familiar topics to anthropologists, but it is only recently that anthropological archaeologists moved to create a discrete specialization, known as Conflict Archaeology. Practitioners now actively pursue research in a number of different areas, such as battlefields, fortifications, and troop encampments. These advances throw into sharp relief areas that need greater focus. This dissertation addresses one of these shortcomings by focusing on the home front by studying Dooley's Ferry, a hamlet that once lay on the banks of the Red River, in southwest Arkansas. Before the American Civil War, it was a node in the commodity ...


An Allegory For Life: An 18th Century African-Influenced Cemetery Landscape, Nassau, Bahamas, Grace S. Turner Jan 2013

An Allegory For Life: An 18th Century African-Influenced Cemetery Landscape, Nassau, Bahamas, Grace S. Turner

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

I use W.E.B. Du Bois' reference to the worlds 'within and without the veil' as the narrative setting for presenting the case of an African-Bahamian urban cemetery in use from the early eighteenth century to the early twentieth century. I argue that people of African descent lived what Du Bois termed a 'double consciousness.' Thus, the ways in which they shaped and changed this cemetery landscape reflect the complexities of their lives. Since the material expressions of this cemetery landscape represent the cultural perspectives of the affiliated communities so changes in its maintenance constitute archaeologically visible evidence of ...


Maximizing Archaeology's Relevance To Its Publics Through A Pragmatist Framework, Kelley Marie Walter Jan 2012

Maximizing Archaeology's Relevance To Its Publics Through A Pragmatist Framework, Kelley Marie Walter

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


"Excellent Clay For Pots": An Archaeological And Microscopic Investigation Of Barbadian Redware During The Early Colonial Era, Erik Andre Siedow Jan 2012

"Excellent Clay For Pots": An Archaeological And Microscopic Investigation Of Barbadian Redware During The Early Colonial Era, Erik Andre Siedow

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


I'M Really Just An American: The Archaeological Importance Of The Black Towns In The American West And Late-Nineteenth Century Constructions Of Blackness, Shea Aisha Winsett Jan 2012

I'M Really Just An American: The Archaeological Importance Of The Black Towns In The American West And Late-Nineteenth Century Constructions Of Blackness, Shea Aisha Winsett

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.