Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

154,794 Full-Text Articles 52,315 Authors 36,491,481 Downloads 396 Institutions

All Articles in History

Faceted Search

154,794 full-text articles. Page 4 of 2458.

“Venerated For Their Bloody Deeds” English Medievalism In Literature, World War I Aviation, And Memorials, Levy Walton Pait 2021 Liberty University

“Venerated For Their Bloody Deeds” English Medievalism In Literature, World War I Aviation, And Memorials, Levy Walton Pait

Masters Theses

Aviators of World War I were trailblazers of the sky. That much is certain. However, there has been a historical debate about their reputation as “knights of the air.” During the war and for many years afterward, World War I aviators were compared to medieval knights battling in honorable duels amongst the clouds. This was an idea popularized by the pilots themselves. David Lloyd George, British Prime Minister during World War I, described pilots, “‘They are the knighthood of this war… they recall the legendary days of chivalry not merely by the daring of their exploits but by the nobility ...


Compromised Values: Charlotte Posenenske, 1966–Present, Ian Wallace 2021 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Compromised Values: Charlotte Posenenske, 1966–Present, Ian Wallace

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Fabricated in unlimited series and sold at cost, the sculptures produced by Charlotte Posenenske between 1966 and 1967—modular wall reliefs, interactive cubic structures, and tubular geometric units whose installation requires collective decision making—were meant to confront both the artwork’s commodity status and the limitation of its consumption to a privileged elite. Nevertheless, Posenenske’s work has been effectively recuperated by the art system: first, in the 1980s, through a series of exhibitions and publications organized by her estate; and second, with her inclusion in Documenta 12 in 2007, which reintroduced her work to the market. Since the ...


Pierce And Pine: Diane Di Prima, Mary Norbert Korte, And The Meeting Of Matter And Spirit, Iris Cushing 2021 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Pierce And Pine: Diane Di Prima, Mary Norbert Korte, And The Meeting Of Matter And Spirit, Iris Cushing

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Diane di Prima (1934-2020) and Mary Norbert Korte (b. 1934) are two poets whose contributions to postwar American poetry are vitally important, and yet their status on the margins of mainstream literary culture has left their work largely unstudied. Di Prima, the granddaughter of Italian Anarchist Domenico Mallozzi (with whom she shared a close relationship) grew up in an Italian-American community in Brooklyn and bore witness to the cultural schizophrenia of WWII as a child. Korte was raised in an affluent Bay Area family, and encountered hardships (including the death of her father when she was 12) that affected her ...


Challenges Of Repatriation: Asante Artifacts At The American Museum Of Natural History, Abdul-Alim Farook 2021 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Challenges Of Repatriation: Asante Artifacts At The American Museum Of Natural History, Abdul-Alim Farook

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Inspired by calls for the repatriation of famous artifacts like the Benin Bronzes and the Elgin Marbles, for this capstone project, I have analyzed and catalogued 250 sampled Asante artifacts at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). Through this analysis, I discuss the many ways museums in North America acquired their collections. By doing so, I explore the difficulties that arise in debates surrounding repatriation due to the manner in which these artifacts were acquired. I argue that due to the many different types of donors of the Asante artifacts to the American Museum of Natural History, the Asante ...


An Extended Vacation, Trizha Loren Aquino 2021 Santa Clara University

An Extended Vacation, Trizha Loren Aquino

General and Other Stories During COVID-19

No abstract provided.


Umaine Office For Diversity And Inclusion_It's Pride Month, Y'All! Email, University of Maine Office for Diversity and Inclusion 2021 The University of Maine

Umaine Office For Diversity And Inclusion_It's Pride Month, Y'All! Email, University Of Maine Office For Diversity And Inclusion

Social Justice: Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion

Email from the UMaine Office for Diversity and Inclusion with various details of the Office's work and events related Pride Month.


Covid-19_Umaine News_Wvii Talks With Lieberthal About Disease Superspreader Prediction, University of Maine Division of Marketing and Communications 2021 The University of Maine

Covid-19_Umaine News_Wvii Talks With Lieberthal About Disease Superspreader Prediction, University Of Maine Division Of Marketing And Communications

Division of Marketing & Communications

Screenshot of UMaine in the News regarding WVII (Channel 7) speaking with Brandon Lieberthal, a University of Maine research associate in the School of Biology and Ecology, about the development of a mathematical model that can be used to identify potential superspreader locations and to predict the efficacy of mitigation strategies.


Brantley Simmons, 2021 Georgia Southern University

Brantley Simmons

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


Solanum Jamesii As A Food Crop: History And Current Status Of A Unique Potato, David Kinder, John Bamberg, Lisbeth Louderback, Bruce Pavlik, Alfonso Del Rio 2021 Ohio Northern University

Solanum Jamesii As A Food Crop: History And Current Status Of A Unique Potato, David Kinder, John Bamberg, Lisbeth Louderback, Bruce Pavlik, Alfonso Del Rio

Pharmacy Faculty Scholarship

Solanum jamesii is a wild potato found in the US southwest. There is ample evidence that this potato was used by ancestral Puebloans as a food source, where some researchers think it was used as a starvation food while others consider it to be regular food source. Currently this potato is being grown by Native Americans, notably the Navajo, as a specialty food as well as a food crop. There are several attributes to this potato that make it especially suitable for development as our climate changes and food needs become more demanding, including its drought tolerance and ability to ...


The Importance Of Human Interaction, Fiona Sundy 2021 Santa Clara University

The Importance Of Human Interaction, Fiona Sundy

Isolation - Physically Separated and Wearing Masks

No abstract provided.


Review Of Writing And Constructing The Self In Great Britain In The Long Eighteenth Century, Edited By John Baker, Marion Leclair, And Allan Ingram, Kelly J. Plante 2021 Wayne State University

Review Of Writing And Constructing The Self In Great Britain In The Long Eighteenth Century, Edited By John Baker, Marion Leclair, And Allan Ingram, Kelly J. Plante

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

A review of Writing and Constructing the Self in Great Britain in the Long Eighteenth Century, eds. John Baker, Marion Leclair, and Allan Ingram. Written by Kelly Plante.


Table Of Contents, 2021 University of South Florida

Table Of Contents

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

No abstract provided.


Full Issue 15.1, 2021 University of South Florida

Full Issue 15.1

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

No abstract provided.


Editors' Introduction, 2021 University of South Florida

Editors' Introduction

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

No abstract provided.


Arts & Literature: The Many Faces Of Hope, Fiza Lee-Winter 2021 Ruhr-Universität Bochum

Arts & Literature: The Many Faces Of Hope, Fiza Lee-Winter

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

No abstract provided.


Arts & Literature: Feeding Her Child A Green Slipper Instead Of A Cucumber, Kaziwa Salih 2021 Queen's University, Canada

Arts & Literature: Feeding Her Child A Green Slipper Instead Of A Cucumber, Kaziwa Salih

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

I first observed the confident, sad, yet hopeful face of Nabat Fayiaq Rahman through the black screen of the TV. She was wearing a traditional, completely black Kurdish outfit that matched the stage curtains designed for the anniversary of the Anfal genocide, marked on April 14th of each year. The Kurdish Anfal genocide in Iraq was perpetrated by Saddam Hussein’s regime in the 1980s. Human Rights Watch (1994) estimates that as many as 182,000 Kurds were buried alive in mass graves; many of these mass graves were found after Hussein was overthrown. More than 2.5 million people ...


Dossier: Uyghur Women In China’S Genocide, Rukiye Turdush, Magnus Fiskesjö 2021 Uyghur Research Institute

Dossier: Uyghur Women In China’S Genocide, Rukiye Turdush, Magnus Fiskesjö

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

In genocide, both women and men suffer. However, their suffering has always been different; with men mostly subjected to torture and killings, and women mostly subjected to torture and mutilation. These differences stem primarily from the perpetrators' ideology and intention to exterminate the targeted people. Many patriarchal societies link men with blood lineage and the group’s continuation, while women embody the group’s reproductivity and dignity. In the ongoing genocide against the Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslims in East Turkistan, the ideology of Chinese colonialism is a root cause. It motivates the targeting of women as the means through ...


“We Planted Rice And Killed People:” Symbiogenetic Destruction In The Cambodian Genocide, Andrew Woolford, Wanda June, Sereyvothny Um 2021 University of Manitoba

“We Planted Rice And Killed People:” Symbiogenetic Destruction In The Cambodian Genocide, Andrew Woolford, Wanda June, Sereyvothny Um

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

In recent years, genocide scholars have given greater attention to the dangers posed by climate change for increasing the prevalence or intensity of genocide. Challenges related to forced migration, resource scarcity, famine, and other threats of the Anthropocene are identified as sources of present and future risk, especially for those committed to genocide prevention. We approach the connection between the natural and social aspects of genocide from a different angle. Our research emanates out of a North American Indigenous studies and new materialist rather than Euro-genocide studies framework, meaning we see the natural and the social (or cultural) as inseparable ...


Art As Atrocity Prevention: The Auschwitz Institute, Artivism, And The 2019 Venice Biennale, Kaitlin Murphy 2021 The University of Arizona

Art As Atrocity Prevention: The Auschwitz Institute, Artivism, And The 2019 Venice Biennale, Kaitlin Murphy

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

Although largely overlooked in genocide and atrocity prevention scholarship, the arts have a critical role to play in mitigating risk factors associated with genocide and atrocity. Grounded in analysis of "Artivism: The Atrocity Prevention Pavilion,” the Auschwitz Institute for the Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities’ 2019 Venice Biennale exhibition and drawing from fieldwork, interviews, and secondary research, this article explores why one of the leading NGOs working to prevent future violent conflict would choose to curate an art exhibit at the Venice Biennale and what might be accomplished through such an exhibit. Ultimately, the Artivism exhibit, in its collection ...


The Impact Of Religious Beliefs, Practices, And Social Networks On Rwandan Rescue Efforts During Genocide, Nicole Fox, Hollie Nyseth Brehm, John Gasana Gasasira 2021 California State University, Sacramento

The Impact Of Religious Beliefs, Practices, And Social Networks On Rwandan Rescue Efforts During Genocide, Nicole Fox, Hollie Nyseth Brehm, John Gasana Gasasira

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

In April 1994, in one of the most Christian nations in Africa, genocidal violence erupted culminating in the deaths of upwards of one million people. While thousands participated in mass killings, others choose not to, and rescued persecuted individuals instead. Relying on 45 in-depth interviews with individuals who rescued others in Rwanda, we demonstrate that religion is tied to rescue efforts in at least three ways: 1) through the creation of cognitive safety nets that enabled high-risk actions; 2) through religious practices that isolated individuals from the social networks of those committing the violence; and 3) through religious social networks ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress