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The Dalai Lama’S Visit To D.C.: A Short Interview With A. Tom Grunfeld, Jeffrey Wasserstrom 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The Dalai Lama’S Visit To D.C.: A Short Interview With A. Tom Grunfeld, Jeffrey Wasserstrom

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

The lead-up to the Dalia Lama’s meeting with President Barack Obama at the White House last week received a great deal of attention from the press, and there was also a considerable amount of after the fact assessment of the event. In order to place what happened into a broad historical perspective, I put a few questions to A. Tom Grunfeld, who is a past contributor to “China Beat” and the author ofThe Making of Modern Tibet. Here are the results of our interview via e-mail, and if you live in New York and want to hear him talk ...


As China Beat Heads Into Its Third Year…, Kate Merkel-Hess 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

As China Beat Heads Into Its Third Year…, Kate Merkel-Hess

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

In January, we marked the end of our second year online. China Beat has changed a lot during that time, and will be changing more in the coming weeks and months as China Beat’s new editor, Maura Cunningham, takes the helm. It’s been my pleasure to have been founding editor of China Beat, and as I transition to a new role at the blog (I will now join the ranks of the blog’s consulting editors), I wanted to look back at how China Beat has developed since January 2008—for new readers and for readers who have ...


A Seventh Take On Jacques, Harald Bockman 2010 University of Oslo

A Seventh Take On Jacques, Harald Bockman

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Since Jeff Wasserstrom posted a round-up of reviews of Martin Jacques’ When China Rules the World, pieces that reference the book have continued to be published, including a column by Robert Samuelson at the Wall Street Journalthat calls Jacques’ book ”masterful.” Jacques, meanwhile, published another op-ed on China and the US last week titled ”Crouching Dragon, Weakened Eagle” in the International Herald Tribune. Below, Harald Bockman raises his concerns about the on-going attention Jacques’ book is receiving, and points out—despite that attention—the weakness in the book that most reviewers are still missing.


Reading Round-Up: Barack Obama And The Dalai Lama, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Reading Round-Up: Barack Obama And The Dalai Lama

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

There have been plenty of news stories recently about today’s meeting between Barack Obama and the Dalai Lama. Here are some suggestions for further reading (and viewing):


Listening On China (This Week), 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Listening On China (This Week)

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We wanted to draw reader attention to a few interviews that aired this week from regular China Beat contributors.


Critical Masses, Commerce, And Shifting State-Society Relations In China, Ying Zhu 2010 University of New York, College of Staten Island

Critical Masses, Commerce, And Shifting State-Society Relations In China, Ying Zhu

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

This essay is based on the script of a talk Ying Zhu gave at Google’s New York offices on February 12, 2010. Sections in bold were not part of the original talk, but have been added by the authors to tease out some of the issues that were left without further elaboration due to time constraints.


Peter Hessler At Uci, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Peter Hessler At Uci

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

A few images from today’s “conversation” between Peter Hessler (currently on tour to promote his newest book, Country Driving) and Ken Pomeranz at the University of California, Irvine, with almost 100 in attendance.


Continuing Coverage Of Country Driving, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Continuing Coverage Of Country Driving

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We’ve reviewed Country Driving, and have been reading what others think of the book as well. Reviews are appearing in a variety of places: just a few we’ve seen are at Urbanatomy, The Boston Globe, and the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune.


Rebuilding, Paul Katz 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Rebuilding, Paul Katz

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Just over five months have passed since the devastation wrought by Typhoon Morakot, and the survivors of the Siaolin Village 小林村 tragedy are coping as best they can with a lot of help from their friends, charitable organizations, and the government. However, the effects of the disaster still linger. Over 400 bodies of victims buried or washed away in the mudslide that followed hours of torrential rains will never be recovered, and there is not a large enough tract of arable land in the unscathed portions of Siaolin, or even all of Chia-hsien Township 甲仙鄉, to rebuild a community sufficient ...


Another Side Of The Shanghai World Expo: Forum On Ict And Urban Development, Susan Brownell 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Another Side Of The Shanghai World Expo: Forum On Ict And Urban Development, Susan Brownell

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

This posting marks my return to blogging after a break following my participation in the founding of The China Beat in 2008 with my postings from Beijing leading up to the Olympics. Contacts I made during the Olympics led to an invitation to do some informal work for the Forum Department of the Expo Organizing Bureau, and so I am now in Shanghai and blogging about China’s second mega-event.


Not Aesopian Enough: A Chinese Publishing Fable, James W. Loewen 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Not Aesopian Enough: A Chinese Publishing Fable, James W. Loewen

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

In April 2008, Ma Wanli, a professor of American history at Nanchang Hangkong University in Nanchang, China, emailed me to introduce himself as the translator of the Chinese version of my U.S. best seller, Lies My Teacher Told Me. He also invited me to write a preface for this new edition. I agreed.


The New Red Guards, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The New Red Guards

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

“Far out to the East of Beijing, past the city’s fifth ringroad, the Cultural Revolution isn’t over yet.


Notes On The Shanghai Expo, Jonathan Hwang 2010 Hopkins-Nanjing Center

Notes On The Shanghai Expo, Jonathan Hwang

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

1. One of my Chinese classmates mentioned that what really mattered for Chinese visitors were the big exhibitions: Japan, China, Europe, and the US. While still interested in the big exhibits, most Westerners were also astounded by the fact that North Korea and Iran were among the countries with pavilions at the Expo. The pavilions, although far from spectacular, showed a side of the “rogue” nations that is impossible to see in Western media, which often focuses on the proliferation of nuclear weapons and anti-US sentiment. The North Korean Pavilion showed video clips of the Mass Games and random shots ...


What Does China Imagine?, Guangyi Li 2010 University of California, Los Angeles

What Does China Imagine?, Guangyi Li

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

One day when I was four, I found an interesting book on the shelf, called A Strange Patient. This anthology starts with an impressive piece of science fiction,Miracle on the World’s Highest Peak by Ye Yonglie. The story describes an investigation of Mount Everest, where, with some Tibetans’ help, scientists find a precious dinosaur egg embedded in amber and preserved intact over time. Unlike their counterparts in Jurassic Park, however, the Chinese scientists don’t extract dinosaur genes and clone this extinguished species. Instead, they hatch a baby dinosaur!


Wang Hui, Plagiarism, And The Great Bourgeois Academic Cultural Revolution, Susan D. Blum 2010 University of Notre Dame

Wang Hui, Plagiarism, And The Great Bourgeois Academic Cultural Revolution, Susan D. Blum

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Another revolution is afoot in China, and it might even be considered cultural. But this one is about academic culture, as China’s slow-moving iceberg floats up against the glacial mass of “international” (read: Western) principles. The fallout is fascinating for observers, though in some cases tragic for the participants.


We’Re Back!, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

We’Re Back!

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We’re returning from a two-week hiatus just in time to call your attention to the final event in a series of author talks that China Beat has produced in cooperation with several other UC Irvine organizations during the 2009-2010 academic year. Tomorrow’s dialogue at UCI, featuring Ian Johnson and Angilee Shah, is free and open to the public (details here).


Questioning The “Chinese Model Of Development”, Zhansui Yu 2010 University of British Columbia

Questioning The “Chinese Model Of Development”, Zhansui Yu

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Chinese, following Chairman Mao’s famous phrase, tend to use the expression “like a fire burning in the wilderness” [燎原之火 liaoyuan zhi huo] to describe the unexpected rise and popularity of something marginalized or rebellious. Since the literary explosion in the years immediately after Mao’s death, mainland Chinese literary circles have rarely witnessed such a “wild fire.” Recently, however, a fierce literary “fire” suddenly broke out and shocked the entire Chinese intellectual world. The spark that ignited this fire is Chan Koon-chung’s 陈冠中 political novel Shengshi: Zhongguo 2013 [盛世:中国 2013]. [1]


More Questions Than Answers, Michelle Yeh 2010 University of California, Davis

More Questions Than Answers, Michelle Yeh

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

Earlier this month, we ran an opinion piece by Peter Zarrow concerning the plagiarism accusations against Tsinghua University Professor Wang Hui, in which Dr. Zarrow explained why he had signed a letter of support organized by international scholars and sent to Tsinghua’s president. The essay was picked up and circulated by the MCLC listserv, where it generated a number of comments. One of the responses came from Michelle Yeh of UC Davis, and we asked Dr. Yeh if she would expand her remarks and share them with China Beat readers. She has done so in the essay below, and ...


R.I.P. China Blogs?, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

R.I.P. China Blogs?

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

We were amused to see that the most recent Sinica podcast was ominously titled “Death of the China Blog,” since here at China Beat we feel very much alive. To our relief, however, the discussion (among host Kaiser Kuo, Imagethief’s Will Moss, and Danwei’s Jeremy Goldkorn — who was good enough to do an interview with us last month) ended with the happy conclusion that while the China blogosphere has changed quite a bit in the past few years, it’s still going strong. We heartily agree.


Musings On A Museum: A Trip To Xibaipo, Kenneth Pomeranz 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Musings On A Museum: A Trip To Xibaipo, Kenneth Pomeranz

The China Beat Blog Archive 2008-2012

A short trip to China earlier this month took me to Beijing to give a talk, to Shijiazhuang for a conference, and, briefly, to the Hebei countryside — my first time in quite a while in rural North China. And it once again proved that every trip teaches you something, but often not on the expected topics. (One little detail that I found telling: most of the Beijing-based academics who were at the Shijiazhuang conference told me it was their first time there. True, Shijiazhuang is not a tourist hot spot, but it is a provincial capital, with over 2 million ...


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