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Breast Cancer Trends Among Kentucky Women, 2004-2007, Kara Ann Hagan 2011 University of Kentucky

Breast Cancer Trends Among Kentucky Women, 2004-2007, Kara Ann Hagan

Theses and Dissertations--Dietetics and Human Nutrition

The purpose of this study is to investigate the discrepancies of female breast cancer mortality between the Appalachian and Non-Appalachian regions of Kentucky using data from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. This study identified subtype, reproductive, and regional differences in women with breast cancer in Kentucky. Among women with breast cancer living in Kentucky from 2004 to 2007, one and three live births significantly increased a woman’s risk of breast cancer mortality by 91% and 58% respectively, compared to a woman with zero live births. Progesterone receptornegative tumor status significantly increased a woman’s risk of breast cancer mortality by ...


Stigmatization As A Social Control Mechanism For Persons Living With Hiv And Aids, Judy E. Mill, Nancy Edwards, Randy C. Jackson, Lynne MacLean, Jean Chaw-Kant 2011 Western University

Stigmatization As A Social Control Mechanism For Persons Living With Hiv And Aids, Judy E. Mill, Nancy Edwards, Randy C. Jackson, Lynne Maclean, Jean Chaw-Kant

Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)

Stigmatization contributes to inequity by marginalizing persons living with HIV and AIDS (PHAs). In this study we examined the stigmatizing practices in health care settings from the perspectives of PHAs and health care providers (HCPs). A qualitative design, using a participatory action research approach, was used. Interviews and focus groups were completed with 16 aboriginal and 17 nonaboriginal individuals living with HIV (APHAs and PHAs) and 27 HCPs in Ottawa and Edmonton, Canada. We present findings to support the premise that stigmatization can be used as a social control mechanism with PHAs. Participants described both active and passive social control ...


Epistemic Fault Lines In Biomedical And Social Approaches To Hiv Prevention, Barry D. Adam 2011 University of Windsor

Epistemic Fault Lines In Biomedical And Social Approaches To Hiv Prevention, Barry D. Adam

Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology Publications

This paper raises the question of how knowledge creation is organized in the area of HIV prevention and how this concatenation of expertise, resources, at-risk people and viruses shapes the knowledge used to impede the epidemic. It also seeks to trouble the discourses of biomedical pre-eminence in the field of HIV prevention by examining the claim for treatment as prevention, looking at evidence constructed through the biomedical frame and through the lens of the sociology of science. These questions lie within a larger socio-historical context of lagging worldwide attention and funding to prevention in the HIV area and, in particular ...


Alcohol And Other Drug Resistance Strategies Employed By Rural Adolescents, Jonathan Pettigrew, Michelle Miller-Day, Janice L. Krieger, Michael L. Hecht 2011 Pennsylvania State University

Alcohol And Other Drug Resistance Strategies Employed By Rural Adolescents, Jonathan Pettigrew, Michelle Miller-Day, Janice L. Krieger, Michael L. Hecht

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

This study seeks to identify how rural adolescents make health decisions and utilize communication strategies to resist influence attempts in offers of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 113 adolescents from rural school districts to solicit information on ATOD norms, past ATOD experiences, and substance offer response episodes. Rural youths’ resistance strategies were similar to previous findings with urban adolescents – refuse, explain, avoid, and leave (the REAL typology) – while unique features of these strategies were identified including the importance of personal narratives, the articulation of a non-user identity, and being “accountable” to self and others.


Health-Seeking Behavior In Families, Kimberly A. Greder, Yoshie Sano 2011 Iowa State University

Health-Seeking Behavior In Families, Kimberly A. Greder, Yoshie Sano

Human Development and Family Studies Publications

Health-seeking behavior means action based on a personal decision to promote wellness or recovery from an illness or disease. To improve the health of families, one must understand how and why people make decisions that affect their health. Factors that shape health-seeking behaviors in families are socioeconomic (e.g.,age, education, literacy,employment, income), social (e.g.,family,culture), and structural (e.g., availability and access to health care).


Society In Crisis: A Critical Perspective On Health Care And Distribution Ofhealth Status In The United States, Curtis D. Hosier 2011 Western Michigan University

Society In Crisis: A Critical Perspective On Health Care And Distribution Ofhealth Status In The United States, Curtis D. Hosier

Dissertations

This research examines U. S. health status both internationally and domestically utilizing indicators infant mortality, life expectancy at birth, and maternal mortality data as comparison. This research compares U.S. health status data with OECD country data to ascertain U.S. rankings internationally. Also, this research examines the distribution of health status within and between sex, class, and racial groups in the U.S. to further the discussion that health status is unequally distributed in the United States. This research found the U.S. ranked in the lowest quartile in each of the health status variables examined internationally. This research ...


2011-2012 Unlv Mcnair Journal, Cyndy Anang, Sajar Camara, Pamela Cornejo, Carla Antonieta Farcello, Ilse Anahi Garcia, Natiera Magnuson, William L. McCurdy, Lorena Munoz, Maxym V. Myroshnychenko, Ricardo Rios, Theodore Waldeck, Barbara Wallen, Ana Zuniga, Brenda M. Aguilar, Tiffany Alexandra Alvarez, Daniel N. Erosa, Paige C. Espinosa, Carla Antonieta Farcello, Julienne Jochel Paraiso, Nathaniel Derek Phillipps, Carmen Vallin, Jacent N. Wamala, Ernesto Zamora-Ramos 2011 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2011-2012 Unlv Mcnair Journal, Cyndy Anang, Sajar Camara, Pamela Cornejo, Carla Antonieta Farcello, Ilse Anahi Garcia, Natiera Magnuson, William L. Mccurdy, Lorena Munoz, Maxym V. Myroshnychenko, Ricardo Rios, Theodore Waldeck, Barbara Wallen, Ana Zuniga, Brenda M. Aguilar, Tiffany Alexandra Alvarez, Daniel N. Erosa, Paige C. Espinosa, Carla Antonieta Farcello, Julienne Jochel Paraiso, Nathaniel Derek Phillipps, Carmen Vallin, Jacent N. Wamala, Ernesto Zamora-Ramos

McNair Journal

Journal articles based on research conducted by undergraduate students in the McNair Scholars Program

Table of Contents

Biography of Dr. Ronald E. McNair

Statements:

Dr. Neal J. Smatresk, UNLV President

Dr. Juanita P. Fain, Vice President of Student Affairs

Dr. William W. Sullivan, Associate Vice President for Retention and Outreach

Mr. Keith Rogers, Deputy Executive Director of the Center for Academic Enrichment and Outreach

McNair Scholars Institute Staff


High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (Hpv) Screening And Detection In Normal, Healthy Patient Saliva Samples: A Pilot Cluster Randomized Study, Deirdre O. Turner, Shelley J. Williams-Cocks, Ryan Bullen, Jeremy Catmull, Jesse Falk, Daniel Martin, Jerom Mauer, Annabel E. Barber, Robert C. Wang, Shawn Gerstenberger, Karl Kingsley 2011 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (Hpv) Screening And Detection In Normal, Healthy Patient Saliva Samples: A Pilot Cluster Randomized Study, Deirdre O. Turner, Shelley J. Williams-Cocks, Ryan Bullen, Jeremy Catmull, Jesse Falk, Daniel Martin, Jerom Mauer, Annabel E. Barber, Robert C. Wang, Shawn Gerstenberger, Karl Kingsley

Environmental & Occupational Health Faculty Publications

Background: The human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a large family of non-enveloped DNA viruses, mainly associated with cervical cancers. Recent epidemiologic evidence has suggested that HPV may be an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal cancers. Evidence now suggests HPV may modulate the malignancy process in some tobacco- and alcohol-induced oropharynx tumors, but might also be the primary oncogenic factor for inducing carcinogenesis among some non-smokers. More evidence, however, is needed regarding oral HPV prevalence among healthy adults to estimate risk. The goal of this study was to perform an HPV screening of normal healthy adults to assess oral HPV prevalence.

Methods ...


Epistemic Fault Lines In Biomedical And Social Approaches To Hiv Prevention, Barry Adam 2010 University of Windsor

Epistemic Fault Lines In Biomedical And Social Approaches To Hiv Prevention, Barry Adam

Barry D Adam

This paper raises the question of how knowledge creation is organized in the area of HIV prevention and how this concatenation of expertise, resources, at-risk people and viruses shapes the knowledge used to impede the epidemic. It also seeks to trouble the discourses of biomedical pre-eminence in the fi eld of HIV prevention by examining the claim for treatment as prevention, looking at evidence constructed through the biomedical frame and through the lens of the sociology of science. These questions lie within a larger socio-historical context of lagging worldwide attention and funding to prevention in the HIV area and, in ...


A Study To Reduce Medication Administration Errors Using Watson’S Caring Theory, Tommie Nelms, Jackie Jones, Linda A. Treiber 2010 Kennesaw State University

A Study To Reduce Medication Administration Errors Using Watson’S Caring Theory, Tommie Nelms, Jackie Jones, Linda A. Treiber

Linda A. Treiber

In a study to decrease medication administration errors, nurses wore brightly colored sashes as a symbol they were performing the important task of giving meds and were not to be interrupted. Situated within Watson’s Caritas theory, the study gave nurses the opportunity to “center” themselves to enhance focus and concentration on medication administration. While nurses appreciated the opportunity to concentrate on administering meds without interruptions by other staff or phone calls, they worried that patient care coordination for which they were responsible was suffering. Interventions focused on enhancing safety of a single task may be incongruent with total patient-centered ...


More Than One In Ten American Households Relies On Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits, Jessica A. Bean, Marybeth J. Mattingly 2010 University of New Hampshire

More Than One In Ten American Households Relies On Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits, Jessica A. Bean, Marybeth J. Mattingly

The Carsey School of Public Policy at the Scholars' Repository

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is one of the most responsive federal programs to economic downturns, as evidence by the increases in SNAP use between 2007 and 2009. Nationally, more than one in ten households relies on SNAP benefits, and the rate is even higher in rural areas, with more than 13 percent of households reporting use. This brief examines the trends in SNAP use across the United States since the recession began in 2007 and considers the impact of legislation in the Congress on those who rely on SNAP to make ends meet.


Beliefs About Alcohol And The College Experience As Moderators Of The Effects Of Perceived Drinking Norms On Student Alcohol Use, Lizabeth A. Crawford, Katherine B. Novak 2010 Butler University

Beliefs About Alcohol And The College Experience As Moderators Of The Effects Of Perceived Drinking Norms On Student Alcohol Use, Lizabeth A. Crawford, Katherine B. Novak

Scholarship and Professional Work - LAS

Many students view the abuse of alcohol as integral to the student role. Thus, they feel entitled to drink heavily without sanction. OLS regression was used to assess the extent to which these beliefs about alcohol and the college experience moderate the effects of descriptive and injunctive campus drinking norms on students’ levels of alcohol consumption. Overall, respondents who perceived that same-sex students on their campus drank heavily tended to drink heavily themselves. This relationship was, however, strongest among individuals who viewed the abuse of alcohol as part of being a student. Although general injunctive norms were not themselves associated ...


In Situ 2010: University Of Pennsylvania Undergraduate Research Journal, Louis Frank, Darien Perez, Vidushi Bajoria, Molly Hude 2010 University of Pennsylvania

In Situ 2010: University Of Pennsylvania Undergraduate Research Journal, Louis Frank, Darien Perez, Vidushi Bajoria, Molly Hude

In Situ

No abstract provided.


Desktop Medicine, Jason Karlawish 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Desktop Medicine, Jason Karlawish

Center for Bioethics Papers

No abstract provided.


Scientific Certainty In A Time Of Uncertainty: Predicting Vulnerability Of Canada's First Nations To Pandemic H1n1/09, Nicholas Spence, Jerry P. White 2010 University of Western Ontario

Scientific Certainty In A Time Of Uncertainty: Predicting Vulnerability Of Canada's First Nations To Pandemic H1n1/09, Nicholas Spence, Jerry P. White

The International Indigenous Policy Journal

On June 11, 2009, the Director General of the World Health Organization, Dr. Margaret Chan, announced that the scientific evidence indicated that the criteria for an influenza pandemic had been met: pandemic H1N1/09 virus, the first in nearly 40 years, was officially upon us. The World Health Organization has estimated that as many as 2 billion or between 15 and 45 percent of the population globally will be infected by the H1N1/09 virus. Scientists and governments have been careful to walk a line between causing mass public fear and ensuring people take the risks seriously. The latest information ...


Fall-Related Stigma In Older Adulthood: A Mixed Methods Approach To Understanding The Influence Of Stigma On Older Adults' Reported Attitudes And Behaviours Regarding Falls, Heather M. Hanson 2010 The University of Western Ontario

Fall-Related Stigma In Older Adulthood: A Mixed Methods Approach To Understanding The Influence Of Stigma On Older Adults' Reported Attitudes And Behaviours Regarding Falls, Heather M. Hanson

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Falls during older adulthood present a major threat to the health and wellbeing of older adults and a challenge to society. While effective fall prevention strategies have been developed to address risk factors for falls, older adults commonly resist participation in such programming and dissociate from the topic of falls in general. After reviewing research findings and the theoretical literature, support was found for approaching falls as a stigmatizing topic for older adults. Three mixed methods experiments were completed to test the influence of stigma on older adults‟ attitudes, opinions, and behaviours. Experiments 1 and 2 tested the labelling aspect ...


A Review Of Psychosocial Support And The Challenges Faced In Disclosing Hiv Positive Status To Children In Kibera, Katherine Lesyna 2010 SIT Study Abroad

A Review Of Psychosocial Support And The Challenges Faced In Disclosing Hiv Positive Status To Children In Kibera, Katherine Lesyna

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

The AIDS pandemic has become an increasingly global problem as well as an everyday reality for most people living in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2009, an estimation of the number of adults and children living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa totaled around 22.4 million.1 The people that have been affected most by the pandemic are women and children.
In Kenya, about 1.5 million people are infected with HIV, about 180,000 of them being children.2 While a lot has been done to reduce HIV infections and treat those who are infected, children have been left behind ...


Percepciones De Género En La Medicina Mapuche: Machi, Matriarca, Y Colonización, Krista Douglass 2010 SIT Study Abroad

Percepciones De Género En La Medicina Mapuche: Machi, Matriarca, Y Colonización, Krista Douglass

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Gender is a social ordering principle; a definition of masculinity and femininity according to an individual culture. While in Chile gender identity is often shaped by machismo, the Mapuche cosmovision is without gender disparities. Rather, relationships between men and women are governed by principles of equality and duality, just as the Mapuche deities balance both male and female energies. Women hold very important roles in the community as the leaders of the medical community. Although both men and women participate in various roles within this profession, machi, the spiritual healers, are mostly women. Males, or wentru machi, occupy a very ...


Las Percepciones De La Salud Mental Y Su Evolución, Rebecca Gourevitch 2010 SIT Study Abroad

Las Percepciones De La Salud Mental Y Su Evolución, Rebecca Gourevitch

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Background: Previous literature has identified a strong stigma against mental health patients in many parts of Latin America, which can serve as a deterrent to seeking help for mental health (Acuña 2005; López 2008; Vicente 2007). The resulting lack of attention to one’s mental health can not only exacerbate mental illnesses but also impede proper attention to one’s physical health (Prince 2007). Therefore, combating this stigma is an important step to improving the health of a population. Some of the most effective strategies for combating the stigma are education, social interaction, and integrating mental health services into primary ...


The Relationship Between Breastfeeding And Child Care For Working Mothers In The United States, Patricia Wonch Hill 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The Relationship Between Breastfeeding And Child Care For Working Mothers In The United States, Patricia Wonch Hill

Sociology Theses, Dissertations, & Student Research

Whether or not child care provider characteristics and factors related to the care giving environment impact breastfeeding duration for working mothers has not been systematically studied. In this dissertation, I use Ecological Health Promotion Theory to explore the relationship between child care and breastfeeding through three different analyses. First, I interviewed nine child care providers to assess their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about infant feeding and whether they vary on these factors across individuals and child care licensing types. Second, I conducted a small mail survey of 93 licensed child care providers in order to create a scale measuring attitudes ...


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