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Racial Microaggressions: The Schooling Experiences Of Black Middle-Class Males In Arizona’S Secondary Schools, Quaylan Allen 2010 Chapman University

Racial Microaggressions: The Schooling Experiences Of Black Middle-Class Males In Arizona’S Secondary Schools, Quaylan Allen

Education Faculty Articles and Research

The literature on Black education has often neglected significant analysis of life in schools and the experience of racism among Black middle-class students in general and Black middle-class males specifically. Moreover, the achievement gap between this population and their White counterparts in many cases is greater than the gap that exists among working-class Blacks and Whites. This study begins to document the aforementioned by illuminating the racial microaggressions experienced by Black middle-class males while in school and how their families’ usage of social and cultural capital deflect the potential negative outcomes of school racism.


Opportunities And Challenges For Gender-Based Legal Reform In China, Rangita de Silva de Alwis 2010 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Opportunities And Challenges For Gender-Based Legal Reform In China, Rangita De Silva De Alwis

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Supporting The Literacy Development Of Children Living In Homeless Shelters, Laurie MacGillivray, Amy Lassiter Ardell, Margaret Sauceda Curwen 2010 University of Memphis

Supporting The Literacy Development Of Children Living In Homeless Shelters, Laurie Macgillivray, Amy Lassiter Ardell, Margaret Sauceda Curwen

Education Faculty Articles and Research

Insights into how educators can create greater classroom support for homeless children, particularly in literacy learning and development, are provided in this article.


Domestication Alone Does Not Lead To Inequality: Intergenerational Wealth Transmission Among Horticulturalists, Michael Gurven, Monique Borgerhoff Mulder, Paul L. Hooper, Hillard Kaplan, Robert Quinlan, Rebecca Sear, Eric Schniter, Christopher von Rueden, Samuel Bowles, Tom Hertz, Adrian Bell 2010 University of California - Santa Barbara

Domestication Alone Does Not Lead To Inequality: Intergenerational Wealth Transmission Among Horticulturalists, Michael Gurven, Monique Borgerhoff Mulder, Paul L. Hooper, Hillard Kaplan, Robert Quinlan, Rebecca Sear, Eric Schniter, Christopher Von Rueden, Samuel Bowles, Tom Hertz, Adrian Bell

Psychology Faculty Articles and Research

We present empirical measures of wealth inequality and its intergenerational transmission among four horticulturalist populations. Wealth is construed broadly as embodied somatic and neural capital, including body size, fertility and cultural knowledge, material capital such as land and household wealth, and relational capital in the form of coalitional support and field labor. Wealth inequality is moderate for most forms of wealth, and intergenerational wealth transmission is low for material resources and moderate for embodied and relational wealth. Our analysis suggests that domestication alone does not transform social structure; rather, the presence of scarce, defensible resources may be required before inequality ...


Humanizing The Other, Cynthia A. Ortega 2010 Claremont McKenna College

Humanizing The Other, Cynthia A. Ortega

CMC Senior Theses

In this piece of literature, storytelling is used as a method towards understanding, knowing, and validating the experience of the “other”, in this case Mexican immigrants of all shapes and colors, sexual preferences, and diverse socioeconomic standing. I would like to shift the discourse from their potential as socioeconomic assets towards a recognition of their essence as participating members of our community. Immigrants are artists, they are intellectuals, they are leaders. They are simply not given the space in American society to develop their potential without being chained down to the “immigrant” label. I would like to stress the recognition ...


Reading Music: Representing Female Performance In Nineteenth-Century British Piano Method Books And Novels, Laura Vorachek 2010 University of Dayton

Reading Music: Representing Female Performance In Nineteenth-Century British Piano Method Books And Novels, Laura Vorachek

English Faculty Publications

The editorial content of piano method books published in the nineteenth century contributed to the gendering of the domestic piano by targeting a middle-class female audience. At the same time, these tutorials circumscribed the ability and ambition of female pianists, cautioning women against technical display or performing challenging pieces in company, thereby reinforcing the stereotype of the graceful, demure woman who played a little. However, this effort was complicated by both the tutorials themselves and contemporary fiction. The middle-class women reading these tutorials also read novels—a fact the method books occasionally acknowledge—which often presented a very different picture ...


Indigenous Health – Australia, Canada, New Zealand And The United States - Laying Claim To A Future That Embraces Health For Us All., Lisa Jackson Pulver, Melissa R. Haswell, Ian Ring, John Waldon, Wayne Clark, Valorie Whetung, Dianne Kinnon, Catherine Graham, Michelle Chino, Jonathon LaValley, Christina Compher, Ritu Sadana 2010 University of New South Wales

Indigenous Health – Australia, Canada, New Zealand And The United States - Laying Claim To A Future That Embraces Health For Us All., Lisa Jackson Pulver, Melissa R. Haswell, Ian Ring, John Waldon, Wayne Clark, Valorie Whetung, Dianne Kinnon, Catherine Graham, Michelle Chino, Jonathon Lavalley, Christina Compher, Ritu Sadana

Community Health Sciences Faculty Publications

Improving the health of all peoples has been a call across the globe for many decades and unfortunately remains relevant today, particularly given the large disparities in health status of peoples found around the world. Rather than differences in health, or health inequalities, we use a different term, health inequities. This is so as mere differences in health (or "inequalities") can be common in societies and do not necessarily reflect unfair social policies or practices. For example, natural ageing implies older people are more prone to illness. Yet, when differences are systematic, socially produced and unfair, these are considered health ...


What About These Children? Assessing Poverty Among The ‘Hidden Population’ Of Multiracial Children In Single-Mother Families, Jenifer Bratter, Sarah Damaske 2010 Rice University

What About These Children? Assessing Poverty Among The ‘Hidden Population’ Of Multiracial Children In Single-Mother Families, Jenifer Bratter, Sarah Damaske

University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research Discussion Paper Series

Capturing the conditions of children of color living in single-parent families has become more complex due to the growing presence of interracial households. This analysis assesses the size and poverty status of single-female headed families housing multiracial children. Using data from the 2000 Census, we find that 9 percent of female-headed families house either children who are classified with more than one race or are classified as a single race different than their mother’s compared to only 3 percent of married couple families. Logistic regression analyses assessing the odds of poverty status for families finds that being a multiracial ...


Household Living Arrangements And Economic Resources Among Mexican Immigrant Families With Children, Mark A. Leach 2010 The Pennsylvania State University

Household Living Arrangements And Economic Resources Among Mexican Immigrant Families With Children, Mark A. Leach

University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research Discussion Paper Series

Using data from the 2000 Census, this study examines the relationship between household living arrangements and economic resources among Mexican immigrant families with children. I model separately the relationships between family income and household structure and proportion of total household income contributed and household structure. The results show that families that coreside with extended kin and non-kin have higher incomes, all else equal, relative to those that reside in single-family households. In addition, Mexican immigrant families that reside in extendedhousehold living arrangements contribute about three quarters of total household income. While families may gain some economic efficiency through extended household ...


State Employment Protection Statutes For Victims Of Domestic Violence As An Employment Matter, Jennifer E. Swanberg, Mamta U. Ojha 2010 University of Kentucky

State Employment Protection Statutes For Victims Of Domestic Violence As An Employment Matter, Jennifer E. Swanberg, Mamta U. Ojha

University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research Discussion Paper Series

Evidence indicates that domestic violence has negative consequences on victims’ employment; yet employers lag in recognizing this as a workplace issue. To address the problem, some states have established several policy solutions. To understand the scope of the public sector’s response to domestic violence as a workplace issue, a content analysis of state-level employment protection policies for domestic violence victims (N=369) was conducted. Results indicate three broad policy categories: 1) policies that offer work leave for victims; 2) policies that aim to reduce employment discrimination of domestic violence victims; and 3) policies that aim to increase awareness and ...


Imprisonment And (Inequality In) Population Health, Christopher Wildeman 2010 Yale University

Imprisonment And (Inequality In) Population Health, Christopher Wildeman

University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research Discussion Paper Series

This article extends research on the consequences of mass imprisonment and the factors shaping population health and health inequities by considering the effects of the imprisonment rate on population health and black-white inequality in population health using state-level panel data from the United States (1980-2004). My results imply that increases in the imprisonment rate harm population health, though the effects on the infant mortality rate and female life expectancy are more consistent than are the effects on male life expectancy. My results also imply that these health effects are concentrated among blacks, implicating mass imprisonment in the persistence of black-white ...


An Exploratory Analysis Of The Relationship Between Student Earnings And Postsecondary Retention, Christopher Jepsen, Darshak P. Patel, Kenneth R. Troske 2010 University of Kentucky

An Exploratory Analysis Of The Relationship Between Student Earnings And Postsecondary Retention, Christopher Jepsen, Darshak P. Patel, Kenneth R. Troske

University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research Discussion Paper Series

Policy makers are becoming increasingly concerned about the high percentage of students who attend postsecondary education without completing a degree. Researchers have studied numerous potential determinants of retention behavior for postsecondary students, such as financial aid, socioeconomic status, academic preparedness, academic and social integration, and expected future wages. However, none of these studies considers students’ earnings while in school as a potential determinant of retention. Using an administrative data from postsecondary institutions matched with administrative earnings data from the state’s unemployment insurance department, our results indicate that student earnings are negatively correlated to student retention in Kentucky postsecondary institutions ...


Family Change And Poverty In Appalachia, Daniel Lichter, Lisa Cimbulak 2010 Cornell University

Family Change And Poverty In Appalachia, Daniel Lichter, Lisa Cimbulak

University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research Discussion Paper Series

The current economic and political climate provides a vivid contrast with the circumstances of the 1990s, when the passage of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) ushered in welfare reform during a period of unprecedented economic expansion and job growth (Blank 2002; Ziliak 2009). This legislation sought to “end the dependence of needy parents on government benefits by promoting job preparation, work, and marriage.” Among PRWORA’s goals were to reduce out-of-wedlock births and encourage the formation of two-parent families. For most states, much of the initial emphasis on self-sufficiency was placed on “work first” programs ...


Earnings And Income Volatility In America: Evidence From Matched Cps, James P. Ziliak, Bradley L. Hardy, Christopher Bollinger 2010 University of Kentucky

Earnings And Income Volatility In America: Evidence From Matched Cps, James P. Ziliak, Bradley L. Hardy, Christopher Bollinger

University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research Discussion Paper Series

In this paper we offer new evidence on earnings and income volatility in the United States over the past four decades by using matched data from the March Current Population Survey. We find that between 1973 and 2008 family income volatility rose by 38 percent, primarily as a result of higher volatility of husbands earnings and non means-tested nonlabor income. Rising family income volatility is in evidence across race, education, and family structure, and after declining sharply while young, it is increasing in the latter part of the life cycle among the skilled. The Federal tax and transfer system dampens ...


Diverging Development: The Not-So-Invisible Hand Of Social Class In The United States, Frank F. Furstenberg 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Diverging Development: The Not-So-Invisible Hand Of Social Class In The United States, Frank F. Furstenberg

Departmental Papers (Sociology)

The advantages and disadvantages associated with social class position build up over time, creating huge developmental differences in the course of growing up. This chapter discusses how development is shaped by social class position and, how the processes associated with class position are either mitigated or amplified over the early part of the life course. By early adulthood, gaping disparities exist between children growing up in disadvantaged and advantaged families. I discuss how these trajectories pose special problems for less advantaged youth making the transition to adulthood due to the need for resources to pay for higher education.


Splitting The Academy: The Emotions Of Intersectionality At Work, Helen A. Moore, Katherine Acosta, Gary Perry, Crystal Edwards 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Splitting The Academy: The Emotions Of Intersectionality At Work, Helen A. Moore, Katherine Acosta, Gary Perry, Crystal Edwards

Sociology Department, Faculty Publications

Using labor market theory, we assess how we have constructed the teaching of required courses on diversity, with the potential splitting of the academy into distinctive labor markets. In-depth interviews with instructors of color and nonminorities who teach required diversity-education courses at a predominately white university are qualitatively assessed and describe the differences in the emotional labor attached to this segmented academic market.We identify specific dimensions of diversity teaching that attach to the job conditions of secondary labor markets, including the distortion of work loads and evidence of differential barriers in the emotional labor attached. These labor market conditions ...


The University Of Nebraska‐Lincoln Human Trafficking Team, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The University Of Nebraska‐Lincoln Human Trafficking Team

Second Annual Interdisciplinary Conference on Human Trafficking, 2010

The University of Nebraska‐Lincoln has seven faculty members that are involved in antitrafficking studies, efforts, and the proposed conference. Also on the team is one former UNL PhD student who now teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, and a consultant from Washington DC.
The Team members:
Dr. Dwayne Ball
Professor Rochelle Dalla
Dr. Ron Hampton
Assistant Professor Anchalee (Joy) Panigabutra-Roberts
Dr. Laura J. Lederer
Dr. Julia Pennington
Dr. Josephine (Jo) R. Potuto
Sriyani Tidball
Dr. Brian L. Wilcox


Sexual Exploitation And Abuse Of Street Children In Romania: Catalysts Of Vulnerability And Challenges In Recovery, Meredith Gamble 2010 The Boston Initiative to Advance Human Rights

Sexual Exploitation And Abuse Of Street Children In Romania: Catalysts Of Vulnerability And Challenges In Recovery, Meredith Gamble

Second Annual Interdisciplinary Conference on Human Trafficking, 2010

An estimated 1,500-3,000 children live on the streets of Romania (UNICEF, 2006; MPHASIS, 2008). Without the basic necessities to survive, a healthy family structure, proper identification, and an education, these children are at a high risk for sexual exploitation. This study examines what factors in the lives of street children contribute to their vulnerability to sexual exploitation and trafficking as well as the effectiveness of existent social services available to street children. Several characteristics in the lives of street children, including poverty and desperation for basic needs, broken family structures, drug use, lack of education, race, and lack ...


Variations In Social Support And Mental Health Among Black Women By Socioeconomic Status, Lesa A. Johnson 2010 University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Variations In Social Support And Mental Health Among Black Women By Socioeconomic Status, Lesa A. Johnson

Sociology Theses, Dissertations, & Student Research

A considerable body of research focuses on the mental health of black women with low socioeconomic status. Social scientists have noted that women in low socioeconomic status groups often utilize social networks to provide protection and survival in dense and depressed communities. Still, some social scientists also suggest that the bounded solidarity of kinship networks decreases chances for women to pursue opportunities for economic mobility by creating stressful and time consuming obligations for reciprocity. Though many qualitative and community quantitative studies have been conducted regarding social support and survival among low income women, few quantitative studies have addressed variation in ...


Domesticating The Diaspora: Memory And The Life Of Sister Katie, Caroline Waldron Merithew 2010 University of Dayton

Domesticating The Diaspora: Memory And The Life Of Sister Katie, Caroline Waldron Merithew

History Faculty Publications

Three shrines in Illinois honor heroes of the working class: one for the legendary Mother Jones; one for the Virden martyrs, who died for coal mining unionism, and whose memory is kept alive by labor organizers around the world; and one for Catherine (Katie) Bianco DeRorre. Katie's monument, unlike the others, draws few visitors today. But when it was dedicated in 1961, men and women — on the floor of the U.S. Congress, in the neighborhood where Katie grew up, at American universities, in union halls, on the streets of New York City, and in Milan — took notice and ...


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